Time to Start a Reslient Community

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redrob25's picture
redrob25
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 2 2010
Posts: 22
Time to Start a Reslient Community

 I have been contemplating how to deal with the current economic issues we face and what the best solution is to face up to the coming turbulent times. I have come to the conclusion that I need to build a resilient community in my area. This is how I came to that conclusion. 

There are basically four options, as I see it, for preparing. 

1) Do Nothing -- These are the head in the sanders, as I call them. You can show them the crash course or just try to have an open dialogue about the current economic, political, and resource issues. But no matter how much they accept the facts, they cannot bring themselves to the point of accepting those facts as being upon us. It's someone else's problem. I fear that these people will get slaughtered in the new reality, and it's just not an approach I can accept for myself and my family. I have to be proactive. 

2) Hunker Down - I have installed solar, built a greenhouse and gardens and will be adding chickens in the spring. I am not close to water supply but have relatives that live on a lake if we need fresh water. However, I am in the suburbs and don't have enough land to sustain myself. So this is stage 1 preparation but not a long term viable solution. Selling the house is out, as we have tried for each of the past two years and had no luck. 

3) Establish a reslient community here in the US - this may be my best option. I already have some land, but it is undeveloped and remote from our jobs. So I would be preparing it remotely and we also have the issue of the locals not being part of the community concept. 

4) Move to a better situation -- Simon Black has done this with his new Chile reslient community project, and Casey has done it in Argentina is a slightly more upscale style. Both may be viable communities, but the buy-in is expensive and limited. I don't know if I will have the financial means to join either or the the international experience to setup my own. I do believe parts of South America will fare better than North America will in the immediate time frame due to better economic conditions, more political freedom, and self-sustainability. 

So my best option is to move from the city and establish a resilient community. This is harder than it sounds. While it is easy to find people affected by the current economy, it is hard to get them to the point of moving forward on a future plan. Education is fairly easy, but the call to action is harder. Most people simply haven't accepted the future state, thinking we will 'bounce back' from this as we 'always have'. 

I want to start my own local resilient community project. I have a few things working in my favor. I have established land with a running spring on it and good grass for grazing. In addition, there are lots right next to me available for sale at extremely discounted prices should anyone wish to join me. Currently this is a second home and I will be spending most of my time in the Dallas area, but will be developing this property as my future site and with everything needed to be independent and off-grid if neccessary. 

This community is outside of the North Texas metroplex, but close enough that travel can be done very easily to a major city, should one need to for a job or to reach an airport. The local community is small and rural, and there is likely to be a low pitchfork factor as most local families will be fairly self-sufficient. 

I can learn the skills I need to be self-sufficient from a food and energy point of view. But I see that as being narrow minded. What happens when I need to fix something mechanical, labor to help build a fence, medical care, or agricultural expertise etc .. ? I think it is clear that those who form communities with varied skills to support each other will surive the strongest. And through that position of strength, can weather the varying challenges we will be facing in the future. 

So at this point, I am looking for others to join me. I may have two already who are willing to fund part of the food supply, IE cows and their associated expenses. One of them comes with some farming experience and the other is computer technical, so can help with local communications, wiring, etc .. We'll need others to join us. If anyone in the DFW area, or willing and able to relocate to DFW to establish a community is interested, please let me know. 

You can email [email protected] dot com or contact me here. I am pretty serious about this and would be looking for serious inquiries only. 

Thanks!

JuanGalt's picture
JuanGalt
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 6 2011
Posts: 188
Re: Resilient Community

Hey RedRob25,

This topic interests me immensely and it's precisely what I want to do perhaps even ranching it up a couple levels where it's really a solid and skill/experience diverse community (maintaining likeminded objectives and similar philosophies of course) as opposed to just a handful of families bandying together. Evolving to small village resort type level like Sam Tailiaferro did in Boquete, Panama woudl be neat.

I agree about point #1.

A shame about point #2 and not being able to sell the house. I thought that part of Texas' real estate market was not that bad off. The suburbs seems like the last place to be for survival purposes, lacking the advantages of rural living and farther from the convenience of city living. Kind of stuck in the middle.

It's great during normal times, perhaps even ideal, but it does not project well for survival needs. Hopefully your local market improves modestly and you find a great marketing gimmick that compels a less than enlightened buyer to acquire the house with you not having to owe anything or come out of pocket at escrow. Thoe buyers are still out there, just harder to find.

Point #3 is interesting, I'm still debating if the somewhere in the US, like the Pacific Northwest, the Intermountain Region or parts of the Four Corners area/Southwest would be best versus a relocation overseas to some place in Central or Southern America for example. For many reasons I think going offshore makes allot of sense but it does create some unusual challenges that would not apply to certain places in the US.

It's just that the political risk (gov't gone wild 1984 style), economic threats (hyperinflation, default, higher taxes, capital & exchange controls, travel freedom, etc...) and even potential terrorist (name your country in the Middle East or North Africa) and nuclear threats (Russia, China, Iran, North Korea, etc...) to the US are so great and project even likely in many cases to happen sometime within the next few years or next decade that it's hard to make an uncontested case for staying in the US being your best option no matter where you relocate. 

Regarding jobs, waaay to limiting a factor. I seriously encourage you to look into starting your own work-at-home or on-line business. That will afford you much more freedom, options, flexibility and if you build it and market it well likely much more income as well plus more time if you employ automation, systematize certain processes and use effective labor leverage.

In your case though, I understand. You already have the land relatively nearby and if it's paid off then that would make that decision "easier". Yo have to really evaluate if the land, surrounding and local variable ar the best fits. I have heard that parts of Texas, like the Northwest Panhandle, Southeast Forests and the Hill County in the north and south can work quiet well for reterat set-up.

Regarding point #4, I agree. Very interesting. I highly respect both Simon Black's and Doug Casey's efforts. They each picked compelling spots. Doug's deal was affordable early on but now somewhat pricey and as you said, it's intended for a certain level of luxury now. Not necessarily a bargain or cheap anymore. I don't have much info on Simon Black'spricing but he does have a great concept going on over there and a strong and well-qualified following. Apparently he has great demand, which does not surprise me,  so I don't imagine that he will need to offer any super agressive deals, discounts or below market pricing. Lots of smart people with money and means are looking to diversify their sovereign risk, internationalize and set-up safe havens/retreats offshore in advance of when TSHTF.

Sounds like you're on to something. I don't think I have an interest in relocating to that part of the country but I may know others that do. Eitherway, I plan to do something similar so it wold be great to keep in touch, exchanges ideas, learnings and knowledge of resources.

I'l PM or e-mail you and maybe refer a couple of people to you might be interested in reolocating and forming part of the community or who could at least assist on some technical or material level.

Good luck with that and look forward to hearing more about how that works out for you.

Best Wishes,

JG

 

 

redrob25's picture
redrob25
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 2 2010
Posts: 22
Thanks JG for your post.I

Thanks JG for your post.

I agree that moving away from the US is the best option. I think we are moving towards a fascist government and there will be war in the air as the economy collapses, much like in Europe. However, I simply don't have the resources to move everything at this time. Perhaps if I had several international businesses and it didn't matter where I lived. But everything we have, from our income to assets, originates in the US.

The Texas real estate market is not horrible, but sales have slowed here as they have everywhere. Prices are falling but there is still way too much inventory. About 10 people put their houses up for sale in my subdivision and none of them sold this year.

About the suburbs, I am not sure that I have quite the negative opinion that some do. I would not want to be in the city in the event of financial collapse. It will be way to dangerous the hoardes of people will form gangs and lawless society. The suburbs will probably have better security and in some places you can pick up some pretty good lots for land. But on the other hand, if the pitchfork factor gets high in the cities, it will eventually spill over to the suburbs. So that is why I purchased land outside the city as a place of refuge. Best case would have been to sell the house here, and move to a rural location outside the city that is close enough to commute into work.

On work .. I have retired and my wife works in a hospital. Her skills will be in demand during a collapse, so I am not so worried about her employment. if she loses her job, she can barter her skills to local clinics. So from that perspective, it may help us to remain somewhat close to population centers. That is kind of why we are keeping our house in the suburbs (IE not walking away from it) and will stay as long as it is safe. But, I'm not taking any chances and will be developing land in the country as a safe harbor.

Ideally, I would like to move to Ecuador or Chile. We can work in either country and there is land to be had. However, unless you have several hundred thousand or a job lined up already, it's a difficult move. And the other factor is family. It is easy to think of leaving the US, but the family is the biggest support group and they are all staying here. I'm not sure starting over in a new country with no friends and family is an ideal situation either.

However, we all have our passports in case it comes to that. If the US goes full authoritarian, I'll just quit the system and leave our real estate. I am establishing an overseas bank account, and already have an overseas gold storage account, which should allow us mobility as a worst case scenario.

I was also contacted by a gentleman who is setting up a reslient area in Japan. It's good to here of others who are thinking along the same lines.

Best,

Robert

JuanGalt's picture
JuanGalt
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 6 2011
Posts: 188
Hey RedRob25, thanks for the response...

Yes, I agree. War and fascism is already here in US and will only get worse.

Moving offshore seems to be a superior option as long as you pick the right spot, conduct your due diligence, plan well and are prepared. Building the right network and connections make a HUGE difference, like in most other things. Relocating to certain parts of the US can stll work but I like the idea of having retreats both in the US and offshore (just in case) but that's a tough nut to crack both financially and with regards to managing it. Heck, even one truly attractive and sustainable retreat is a challenge. Easy solution? Make ALLOT money, LOL. Then yo can buy all you need and hire others to help you build and manage it. 

You're right though, initially, it's likely more difficult and possibly even costlier to relocate overseas and create a sustainable lifestyle depending on where you go and and how you go about it. Long-term, I think it's cheaper and much safer once you have certain things in place and get the gist of how to exploit the advantages. Allot of it comes down to perspective and how you interpret and are able to act upon opportunity.

Sounds about right regarding Texas. Much better real estate market than most of the highly populated coasts, bubbled up and fast growing interior citieslike Vegas and Phoenix and/or economically troubled areas like Cleveland and Detriot. However, it's all relative. Better off does not mean good.

Yeah, a city like LA is likely the last place you want to be during a real crisis and apocalyptic scenario but smaller cities or towns may not be as bad. Suburbs are great for the most part but if you are father away from certain resources and services or not isolated and self-sustaining like in the country then you're kind of in the middle. It has its challenges during a real survival period.

Yes, hopefully you can sell the house and move to a more rural setting. Then you can always rent a little apartment or condo in the city for convenience and/or business. In many places you can rent a pretty decent little place for between $500-$1000/mo. and kind of have the best of both worlds without having to commit too much money or resources to a city location.

You could also always explore those REOs and auction sales for a little house or condo in the city and typically buy a nice place for less than $100K (in many cities) @ somewhere between 50-75% of fair market value and sometimes as as low 25-35% of replacement cost (depending on what kind of work you're willing to put into the property). The land often comes out free or super cheap so what you're really paying for is just a fraction of the cost to build/replicate suhc a unit. I see these types of opportunities quite often and know how to find them. I've just not settled on where to buy yet and am saving in PMs for a rural land purchase plus custom build-out as my #1 priority. I still have some more trips to take and will definitely rent before buying anywhere.

Great that your wife has medical skills. Always quite handy and marketable. She should really expand on those and try to increase their marketability.

As for you, invest wisely in passive income and perhaps investigate some type of part-time business you enjoy to bring in more income. More income always helps as this prep and survival retreat business costs a bunch if you want to do it right and enjoy what you create.

I like Chile, not sure about Ecuador but I do hear it's very cheap there, quite nice in certain areas and International Living has named it's #1 Retirement spot. I think I prefer a few other places over Ecuador but it's not a bad choice.

Yeah, the family deal is tough. You either have to get them on board and convince them to join the cause with requisite prep effort, sacrifices, compromises and investment or evaluate if your personal happiness and safety (and that of your immediate family, particularly those living with you) is more important than that of your extended family and friends.

I find that if you have enough money you can overcome most people's objections by compensating for certain things and accomodating people where ever you go through some perks and luxuries they coudl not otherwise affrod in the US but then the financial burden falls more on your shoulders and becomes a greater challenge as opposed to everyone agreeing and being willing to make certain compromises and adaptations in exchange for safety and sustainability. Not an easy decision.

For myself, I do what I can for those I care about but ultimately I'm committed to my safety and happiness and that of my partner or future wife and/or children above anything. My significant other and children have to be onboard on my plan (it's my role to edcuate and lead them) and as long as I can provide for their prosperity and safety I don't see how they should have any objections. Others, I don't see as my business or role and governing or controlling what they do. I can only make a sincere effort but utimately it's their business.     

Get those offshore accounts set-up and secure gold storage. Maintain discretion and privacy as best as possible.

I heard about the rural Japan thing as well but am not sure about that one. Japan is known for their xenophobic culture, the radiation danger is still quite unclear (certainly can't trust what the gov't there states) and they are a prime suspect for major economic collapse, likely not too long after Europe. I claim some ignorance there because I don't much about Japan but in my research on ideal international retreat locations it has not come up on my radar at all aside from that one gentleman who mentioned it. Then again, I even know some guys buying land and building retreats down in Madagascar. That one was a new one for me as well. Who knows, I just wish everyone luck.  

Perhaps we'll KIT off-line and exchange notes. Good luck with that.

Best,

JG

 

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