Is there hope for a young college student like me?

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xseo93x's picture
xseo93x
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Is there hope for a young college student like me?

 Hello everyone, so I just recently finished reading the crash course and I found it to hit me very hard, chaning my perspectives and altering some of my ideology in economics. Though I found it very troubling through all of my research through this book and outside sources that all of these topics are more geared towards people who currently live in a financially stable life or those who are past education. I am currently an economics major student and George Mason University and I was wondering if there would be any hope for me to go through these transition as well as even have the chance to stock up more on precious metals. By the time I graduate it will already be 2015 and according to the crash course and all of the debt and inflation issues i've learned about from other sources, American economy may very well collapse before then. So to sum it up, I guess if I cannot really apply some of the advices that the Crash Course offers, what more can a young college freshman like me do to prepare for my future, and is this education even going to be worth it if all everything comes down before I even establish myself in the job market. I have purchased 1200 dollars of silver bullion, but I fear that it will hardly be anything in comparison to the more bullish gold investors who do have the mean to make such investments. Please leave some feedback and answers, as well as suggestions, it would be very much appreciated and would help me better reach my fellow friends. Thank You!

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Davos
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$1,200

 

Well, assuming gold goes to $10,000 an ounce and silver catches up on its ratio (now an insane 50:1) and goes to say, 7:1, that $1,200 will be $50,000.  Great for fixed debt if you are racking it up to be there.  

Of course, the creep is going to snap into hyperinflation (if you ask me).  Bernanke is calling it 2%, and since 2009 oil has gone from $47.10 a barrel to $106.70 (up 127%),--- Gold from $922 an ounce to $1707 (up 85%), ---Silver is up 155% since March 9, 2009--- Overall food prices are up 35% since March 9, 2009 ---Beef prices are up 72% since March 9, 2009--- Gasoline prices are up 132% since March 9, 2009 ---Corn prices are up 70% since March 9, 2009.

None of this has gone up, the doller (or dawler as my favorite Canadian reporter calls it) has gone down.  So that $50k will probably buy you a few textbooks in your last year.  But hey, I'm an optomist.

My wife just graduated.  No debt.  Her base courses were super.  The school couldn't teach computer programing to save its collective (ehem).  I b#tched.  At $1,500 a class---school of hard knocks me---should NOT have been teaching her how to code in C# and VB dot Net.

Personally I used to regret not having an education.  After seeing that bee-s I have no regrets.  I wrote the president and told him his school was $hit and his information systems professors $&^#d.

If I were in your shoes and if debt was involved I'd be off like a prom dress---after I told the college president & momo econ professors just how $hitty the classes were in comparison to the Crash Course.  (And I'm assuming here that they are as cr#ppy as the rest of the universities economics curriculums?)  These morons need to hear the truth.  

If you're there debt free and it isn't breaking your families bank---enjoy. I'd sure as h#ll change my major and get into something like permaculture or alternate energy.  A degree in Keynesian Economics will be as valuable as used toilet paper.

One more thing: While I'm uber-proud of my wife the graduation ceremony was like a court jester joke.  Master Degrees in Homeland Security?  School should be like it was in the old days, if you wanted to be an engineer or doctor or something like that you went, otherwise you went to work. 

 

Millionaires & Billionaires

College will improve your lifetime earning potential, but it didn’t make a difference for these people.

  1. John D. Rockefeller, Sr.: This high school dropout was the first American billionaire.
  2. Kirk Kerkorian: Kirk Kerkorian is said to be the richest man in Los Angeles with a personal fortune of $16 billion, although he dropped out of school in the 8th grade.
  3. Mark Zuckerberg: This young billionaire started Facebook on summer vacation.
  4. Sheldon Adelson: Sheldon Adelson dropped out of City College of New York before earning enough credits for a degree.
  5. Stanley Ho: The King of Gambling left college after a couple years.
  6. Kevin Rose: Rose used house down payment money to start the website Digg, although he dropped out of UNLV.

Artists & Musicians

Check out these artists that didn’t need formal training.

  1. Frank Lloyd Wright: Frank Lloyd Wright left high school behind to work in the University of Wisconsin’s Engineering department.
  2. William Eggleston: William Eggleston attended Vanderbilt and the University of Mississippi without graduating from either.
  3. Ansel Adams: Photographer Ansel Adams was educated through homeschooling and grammar school.
  4. Christina Aguilera: Christina was pulled out of high school because of kids who were jealous of her fame.
  5. Ray Charles: Beloved musician Ray Charles left school at 15 after his mother died.
  6. Andre Benjamin: More commonly known as Andre 3000, Andre Benjamin earned a high school equivalency degree.
  7. Eminem: Eminem’s education ended in high school.
  8. Cher: Cher’s career began at the age of 17.
  9. Louis Armstrong: Louis Armstrong dropped out of the Fisk School for Boys at 11, and joined a quartet of boys.
  10. Tom Petty: Tom Petty dropped out of high school at 17 to join the band Mud Crutch.
  11. Glen Campbell: By 18, Glen Campbell was on tour as part of the Western Wranglers.
  12. Sheldon Harvey: Sheldon Harvey left high school to care for his wife and son, and later attended community college without graduating.
  13. Coco Chanel: Her work is studied in colleges, but Coco Chanel did not attend one.

Entrepreneurs

These respected entrepreneurs did it all without a degree.

  1. Mary Kay Ash: Mary Kay Ash’s family could not afford to send her to college, but she was able to build a successful cosmetics company.
  2. Jack Taylor: Jack Taylor founded Enterprise Rent-A-Car, although he dropped out of college in World War II.
  3. Mike Hudack: Mike Hudack never went to college, but he founded blip.tv.
  4. Paul Allen: Paul Allen dropped out of Washington University to co-found Microsoft with Bill Gates.
  5. W. Clement Stone: W. Clement Stone dropped out of elementary school, although he later too high school night courses and some college.
  6. Debbi Fields: Mrs. Fields turned her chocolate chip cookie recipe into a successful food franchise.
  7. Sir Richard Branson: Richard Branson dropped out of high school, but he went on to successfully publish "Student" magazine.
  8. Larry Ellison: Before starting Oracle Corporation, he dropped out of both the University of Illinois and University of Chicago.
  9. Arthur Ernest Morgan: Engineer Arthur Ernest Morgan learned the practice by apprenticeship.
  10. Ted Turner: Ted Turner was rejected by Princeton and Harvard.
  11. Bill Gates: Bill Gates is one of the richest people in the world, but he was a college dropout.
  12. John Carmack: The cofounder of id Software John Carmack dropped out of University of Missouri.
  13. Michael Dell: The founder of Dell dropped out of college when his dorm room business began grossing about $80,000 per month.
  14. David Karp: Although David Karp dropped out of the Bronx High School of Science at 15, he founded Tumblr.
  15. Milton Hershey: Milton Hershey started his own chocolate company with only a 4th grade education.
  16. Dave Thomas: Dave Thomas got his first job at 12, dropped out of school at 15, invested in KFC, and opened his first Wendy’s.
  17. Ralph Lauren: Ralph Lauren studied business for two years before dropping out of college.
  18. Ty Warner: Toy tycoon Ty Warner dropped out of Kalamazoo College to sell stuffed animals.
  19. Steve Jobs: Steve Jobs attended only one semester of college.

Athletes

These athletes skipped over college in favor of an athletic dream.

  1. Rashard Lewis: Rashard Lewis left behind Alief Elsik high school to be drafted into the NBA.
  2. Kevin Garnett: Kevin Garnett has played in the NBA for more than 14 years since skipping college.
  3. Andre Agassi: Tennis player Andre Agassi quit school in 9th grade to go to the tennis courts.
  4. LeBron James: LeBron James skipped college to go straight into the NBA and sign an endorsement deal with Nike.
  5. Dwight Howard: After being drafted as a first pick, Dwight Howard decided not to go to college.
  6. Kobe Bryant: Kobe Bryant was drafted straight out of high school into the Charlotte Hornets.
  7. Mario Andretti: Although Mario Andretti dropped out of high school, he later earned an equivalency degree.

Actors

Although they didn’t go to college, these actors are still well-respected.

  1. John Travolta: John Travolta started his movie career at the age of 16 when he dropped out of high school.
  2. Julie Andrews: Julie Andrews, Oscar winning actress, singer and author dropped out of high school.
  3. Pierce Brosnan: Before his stage acting career, Pierce Brosnan left school at 16.
  4. Kevin Bacon: Kevin Bacon skipped college to go to New York and study drama.
  5. Ellen Burstyn: Ellen Burstyn left home at 18 before her Broadway debut.
  6. Johnny Depp: Johnny Depp dropped out of high school to become a movie star.
  7. Ellen DeGeneres: Ellen DeGeneres only studied one year at the University of New Orleans to work odd jobs while getting started as a comedienne.
  8. Raymond Burr: Actor Raymond Burr claimed to attend Stanford and Columbia, but he never actually went to college.
  9. Steve Martin: Steve Martin dropped out of college at 21.
  10. James Dean: After earning the role of Malcolm in Macbeth, James Dean left UCLA in pursuit of full-time acting.
  11. Marisa Tomei: Marisa Tomei attended Boston University and New York University, but didn’t graduate from either before pursuing work with As the World Turns.
  12. Brad Pitt: Brad Pitt left the University of Missouri two weeks before graduation to take acting classes in LA.
  13. Chris Rock: Comedian and actor Chris Rock was a high school dropout at the age of 17.
  14. Halle Berry: Halle Berry moved to Chicago immediately after high school to start her modeling and acting career.
  15. Nicholas Cage: Although he dropped out of Beverly High School at 17, Nicholas Cage has become one of the most powerful people in Hollywood.
  16. Michael J. Fox: Michael J. Fox’s education did not extend past high school.
  17. Jim Carrey: Golden Globe winner Jim Carrey left high school at 16.
  18. Tom Hanks: Tom Hanks dropped out of college to be an intern at the Great Lakes Theater Festival.
  19. Michael Caine: Michael Caine, Oscar winning actor, dropped out of high school.
  20. Joe Pesci: Joe Pesci went from high school dropout to making $3,000,000 from Lethal Weapon.

Writers

Check out these writers that created beautiful works without the help of a college education.

  1. Jack London: Author Jack London quit school after learning about his family’s past.
  2. William Blake: Poet and artist William Blake was educated at home by his mother.
  3. William Faulkner: This Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist dropped out of both high school and the University of Mississippi.
  4. Jack Kerouac: Kerouac left his athletic scholarship at Columbia University behind after he cracked his tibia.
  5. Robert Frost: Beloved poet Robert Frost dropped out of Dartmouth College.
  6. Doris Lessig: Doris Lessig won the Nobel Prize for Literature, but ended her formal schooling at 14.

Entertainment

These masters of the entertainment business didn’t need a college degree.

  1. Simon Cowell: Simon Cowell didn’t go to college, but rather started in a mailroom for a music publishing company.
  2. William Hanna: Cartoonist William Hanna dropped out of college at the beginning of the Great Depression.
  3. Aaron Brown: Aaron Brown dropped out of the University of Minnesota to sign up for active duty in the Coast Guard.
  4. Quentin Tarantino: This successful moviemaker dropped out in 9th grade.
  5. Sammy Cahn: Oscar-winning songwriter Sammy Cahn dropped out of high school.
  6. David Geffen: David Geffen dropped out of Brooklyn College and the University of Texas.
  7. James Cameron: He’s gone on to become an Oscar winning director, producer, and screenwriter, but James Cameron dropped out of California State University.
  8. Peter Jennings: Peter Jennings attended the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, but he did not graduate from either.
  9. Rachael Ray: With no formal training in college or culinary arts, Rachael Ray has become a star in the food and entertainment industry.
  10. Jim Clark: Jim Clark’s education didn’t get past prep school.
  11. Woody Allen: Woody Allen had false starts at NYU and City College of New York before becoming a full-time writer.
  12. Steven Spielberg: Steven Spielberg was denied acceptance to film school, but has since become one of the world’s most successful movie directors and producers.
  13. Barry Diller: The founder of Fox, Barry Diller, was a college dropout.
  14. Walt Disney: Walt Disney dropped out of high school at 16, but went on to find success as an animator and businessman.

Inventors

These inventors created using just their ingenuity.

  1. Henry Ford: Ford left home at 16 to apprentice as a machinist.
  2. Steve Wozniak: The Woz dropped out of college to design calculators at Hewlett-Packard.
  3. Thomas Edison: Thomas Edison only went to school for a few months, but his mother taught him at home.
  4. Dean Kamen: Dean Kamen dropped out of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, but he holds more than 80 US patents.

Presidents & Politicians

Find out which great leaders achieved greatness without a degree.

  1. George Washington: George Washington only went to school until he was 14 or 15.
  2. Andrew Jackson: Even without a college degree, Andrew Jackson was an American President, Congressman, and more.
  3. Patrick Henry: Patrick Henry attended local schools and was tutored by his father, but he never went to college.
  4. Martin Van Buren: Although he did not attend college, he was able to work as a law clerk for several years before becoming a lawyer.
  5. Zachary Taylor: Instead of going to college or studying on his own, Zachary Taylor served in the military.
  6. Millard Fillmore: Millard Fillmore had only six months of formal schooling.
  7. Benjamin Franklin: The Remarkable Benjamin Franklin received less than two years of formal education.
  8. Abraham Lincoln: Abraham Lincoln came from a poor family who didn’t live close to a school, but he taught himself to read and become a lawyer.
  9. Harry S. Truman: This American President’s formal education ended with high school.
  10. Winston Churchill: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill flunked out a sixth grade, and although he graduated 8th out of a class of 150 at the Royal Military Academy, he never attended college.
  11. Grover Cleveland: Grover Cleveland was unable to go to college, instead having to work when his father died.

 

 

thatchmo's picture
thatchmo
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college, eh?

x------, welcome to the boards.  It's always good to have the views of the younger folks to reflect upon.  I second Davos'

If you're there debt free and it isn't breaking your families bank---enjoy. I'd sure as h#ll change my major and get into something like permaculture or alternate energy. A degree in Keynesian Economics will be as valuable as used toilet paper.

Keep in mind there are also millions of folks with similar educational backrounds as those on the above list that have been able to support themselves and their families through hard work, or, like many in the list, skill or dumb luck. I want to suggest just going out and getting a real job as a real learning experience, but in this economy, that would be a challenge- which is always educational. Being young and flexible may have definite advantages in the unknown future.  Having a degree in economics, maybe (not)....I got a Bachelors Degree- never used it.  I've done OK.  You, like most other young folks, will do OK as well.  Although it gets large play on this forum, don't worry about PMs at your age unless you have adequate discretionary income.  Plenty of other things to spend your time and money on to your benefit.  But, as you are in college, take some time to learn some sentence structuring and punctuation.  Some folks will judge you on such things, especially in this world of non-face-to-face communication.  This ain't Twitter.  Aloha, Steve.

Poet's picture
Poet
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Posts: 1891
Yes There IS Hope For A Young College Student Like You

Honestly, we don't know how long the current situation will last. People who predict doom and gloom are often off by several years, as Dmitri Orlov is fond of saying.

Besides, there really is a lot of inertia and life does go on in. Even today, there are engineers, doctors, and plumbers working and collecting money in Greece and Argentina. Fewer restaurants are open in Greece and Argentina, but they still exist.

College
So... If I were an economics major, yes, I would consider switching my major. Banks have shed numerous jobs in finance, so economics doesn't look so hot right now - especially if I were to go out there, trying to compete against people who have years of experience at major firms.

Since there is so much math and calculus in economics, and it looks like you're still a lower-division student, you might as well consider something practical like mechanical or petroleum engineering or nursing. Maybe also learn some machining and automotive repair. (If you love economics, you can always pick up on that stuff later. On the side, as a hobby, like entrepreneurship. Something that you can incubate and subsidize with your salary.)

Sure there are exceptions to the education rule. Like good-looking, charismatic people. Or people like Bill Gates (who cheatedin the late 80s by signing contracts with several major computer manufacturers under which they got a discount price, but agreed to pay Microsoft for every computer they shipped, whether or not it included the Microsoft operating system), Steve Jobs (who cheated his partner Steve Wozniak on initial contracts and pocketed the extra profits, then later ousted him), and Mark Zuckerberg (who cheated the Winklevoss twins after agreeing to code for them).

But for the rest of us, having a college degree is still strongly correlated with lower unemployment levels, compared with those who dropped out of high school or only possess a high school diploma. (Except majors like social psychology. The unemployment level for social psychology majors is something like 14%. Sorry, various ethnic studies, religious studies, international relations studies and social sciences just won't cut it. You don't want to be one of the 317,000 college graduates who wait tables for a living - it's an honorable profession but you don't need a college degree for it.)

For more information, see this post, especially the part on "The Economic Value Of College Majors":
http://www.peakprosperity.com/comment/111530#comment-111530

Debt
If debt is a major issue, then yes, you may want to consider doing something else instead, such as automotive repair at a community college and getting certified. A good mechanic can make really good money, and not come out owing so much money that it is a burden to service.

Or, consider going to a community college while working part time and living at home, then transfer to a four-year university while living at home. I did that and it certainly saved me a lot of money. My resume doesn't say I went to a community college. It says I have a degree from a four-year university.

Youth
You have a major advantage. Youth. You are likely mobile, without a house or a marriage or kids and the accompanying complexities. Take care of your body, develop strength and endurance, learn awareness, learn self-defense and learn how to shoot. Learn all sorts of self-reliant skills and train your mind: like gardening, first aid, home repairs, survival, etc.

Invest in some good-quality tools and learn how to use them well. Build relationships with a few people you trust. Don't advertise that you're a "prepper". Keep a bug-out bag handy.

The main reason people save gold is because they'll need to pay someone for something later. If people have to pay you because they NEED your expertise... Well, that's when you'll get to start saving up gold.

Final Thoughts
My thoughts are that, of what was traditionally thought of as the American middle class of 20 years ago, only 2/3rds can still afford that standard of living today. And then, only half of today's people who can, will still be able to afford that standard in 20 years. That can still leave millions of American families doing well and you can reasonable get there - you have a head start because you know "what's up". And even if you can't get there, you can still focus on raising your quality of life even as your standard of living goes down. By focusing on what really matters: Family, friends, financial security/independence, resilience, agility, relationships, confidence, fun experiences, free entertainment, charity, etc.

Live your life well. With meaning. In the end, you can't take your gold with you.

Poet

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RNcarl
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Posts: 382
Poet wrote: Honestly, we
Poet wrote:

Honestly, we don't know how long the current situation will last. People who predict doom and gloom are often off by several years, as Dmitri Orlov is fond of saying.

Besides, there really is a lot of inertia and life does go on in. Even today, there are engineers, doctors, and plumbers working and collecting money in Greece and Argentina. Fewer restaurants are open in Greece and Argentina, but they still exist.

College

<snip>

But for the rest of us, having a college degree is still strongly correlated with lower unemployment levels, compared with those who dropped out of high school or only possess a high school diploma. (Except majors like social psychology. The unemployment level for social psychology majors is something like 14%. Sorry, various ethnic studies, religious studies, international relations studies and social sciences just won't cut it. You don't want to be one of the 317,000 college graduates who wait tables for a living - it's an honorable profession but you don't need a college degree for it.)

For more information, see this post, especially the part on "The Economic Value Of College Majors":
http://www.peakprosperity.com/comment/111530#comment-111530

<snip>

Youth
You have a major advantage. Youth. You are likely mobile, without a house or a marriage or kids and the accompanying complexities. Take care of your body, develop strength and endurance, learn awareness, learn self-defense and learn how to shoot. Learn all sorts of self-reliant skills and train your mind: like gardening, first aid, home repairs, survival, etc.

Invest in some good-quality tools and learn how to use them well. Build relationships with a few people you trust. Don't advertise that you're a "prepper". Keep a bug-out bag handy.

The main reason people save gold is because they'll need to pay someone for something later. If people have to pay you because they NEED your expertise... Well, that's when you'll get to start saving up gold.

Final Thoughts
My thoughts are that, of what was traditionally thought of as the American middle class of 20 years ago, only 2/3rds can still afford that standard of living today. And then, only half of today's people who can, will still be able to afford that standard in 20 years. That can still leave millions of American families doing well and you can reasonable get there - you have a head start because you know "what's up". And even if you can't get there, you can still focus on raising your quality of life even as your standard of living goes down. By focusing on what really matters: Family, friends, financial security/independence, resilience, agility, relationships, confidence, fun experiences, free entertainment, charity, etc.

Live your life well. With meaning. In the end, you can't take your gold with you.

Poet

+1

I would say that 2/3 of folks "still living the dream" are doing so only fueled by debt and both household partners working. (Remember, June Cleaver stayed at home and did her "chores" while wearing pearls and high heels. - Google it to understand the cliche.) I would suggest that less than half can still really afford the old paradigm.

Two more thoughts about education:

One, Your college should be teaching you to think independently and problem solve. They should be having you do exercises in adaptability, improvisation and resilience. Meaning, they should be teaching you HOW to learn. Your education only begins when you LEAVE the cradle of school.

Second, I do not believe that a four year college does nor should be used as "vocational training." If you are expecting to exit college after four years with a diploma that says you are now a (____) fill in the blank. That is not going to work any more and you should take the advice of going to a trade type school.

Lastly, remember the analogy of exponential function. When Chris asks the question, "At what time is Fenway Park still 95% empty?" you have to know where you (we) are on the curve. In engineering we used the generic term "critical mass" to explain that point on the curve where things go "boom" whether it was electrical, chemical or mechanical. So ask yourself, "where are we on the curve?" Just remember the scale you are looking at as well. Things will limp alone for a long time... until they won't. There is a lot of inertia in our system and remember, unlike things that go "BOOM!" when we turn the curve the explosion will be in the status quo. So things will be different but they won't disappear.

FWIW, C.

Doug's picture
Doug
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Branson

 Davos mentioned Richard Branson as one who did not complete HS.  I saw an interview with him in which the interviewer asked him about not finishing HS.  He appeared to ponder the question for a few seconds and said (paraphrasing) I don't believe I know a successful entrepreneur who graduated high school.

I've thought about that a lot since first hearing it.

Doug

Davos's picture
Davos
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Posts: 3620
Doug wrote:Davos mentioned
Doug wrote:

Davos mentioned Richard Branson as one who did not complete HS.  I saw an interview with him in which the interviewer asked him about not finishing HS.  He appeared to ponder the question for a few seconds and said (paraphrasing) I don't believe I know a successful entrepreneur who graduated high school.

I've thought about that a lot since first hearing it.

Doug

Before I go off---again---let me just underscore what Steve said, if you write like I do you'll be called a moron.  

And, RNcarl states that school doesn't teach you it gives you the ability to learn.  I agree it doesn't teach you.  That said, when I was trying to wrap my mind around OOP I broke down and "dropped in" (audited) a class at the community college.  The first 2 I walked out on---after telling the professors they were very good at coding and smart but my dog could teach better.  The third was the proverbial charm.  A guy who was older than dirt and learned how to program on punch cards.  He knew computers so well----and he could teach.  Frankly if every teacher was like him I'd have stayed in school in the 80s.  School could teach you how to think---if they hired good teachers and not momos.  That guy could impart how to solve a thinking problem (an algorythm).

Also, flight school was cr#p in the classroom.  Bernoulli's law is what I was taught and later taught others makes lift.  It isn't.  I paid about $40K and did it the "vocational" way, some kids I later flew with got out of fine schools like UND or Perdue, Dowlling, and one in New Hampshire that went bust, many were carying $90K in student debt----all taught the same bee-s.

Funny, I just put down the Jobs book and picked up the Branson book.  The first was better.  I relate well to Jobs's binary thinking where everything is 0 or 1, there are no decimals in between.  "People are either gods or $hi#heads."  "Products are either great or cr#p".  I think what Branson was saying is the structure of school is a weapon of mass dumbification.  It kills common sense and takes creativity along with it.

There are some incredibly smart people (gods) with education that have maintained common sense.  CM, Dr. Al, Jim P, Jim Quinn...  And then there are some $h#%*#@^ds: 

 

The “Leadership” 5%

“Our high priest and priestesses of money are in danger of being revealed as powerless frauds”~Chris Martenson & Charles Eisenstein

Ben S. Bernanke

Education: Harvard Bachelor of Arts in economics, roomed with CEO of Goldman Sachs-”Doing God’s Work”-Blankfein PdD economics MIT.

Employment: Visiting professor at NYU, Tenured Princeton Economics Professor, Board of Governors Federal Reserve System 2002-2005, Chairman of Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers, Chairman of the Fed 2006-present.

Failures: Helped blow the biggest bubble in economic history, the bubble that has decimated the economy and tossed us into the Second Great Depression.  Failed to regulate the banks with regard to derivatives.  Lied that housing wasn’t in a bubble, lied that  housing prices had never have fallen on a nationwide basis (2005), then laughed about the impending bubble at the December 2005 FOMC meeting.  Lied and continues to lie about inflation (it is 11% not 2.2%), lies about unemployment being 8-9% when it is 23%.  Worst of all he is leading us over the financial repression cliff, which wont work this time.  Ninety-nine percent of all the countries are, for the first time in history—all broke at the same point and time.

Bottom line: The Fed has 2 mandates, maximum employment and stable prices.  Unemployment is 23% and inflation is running at 11% a year.  It is obvious that Bernanke’s mandate is to support his Harvard roommate and the member banks that own the Fed, link.

His biggest failure: His inability to acknowledge we’re in the Second Great Depression.  His inability and and failure to correct the total and absolute insolvency of the banks and the country by implementing an overt and immediate currency revaluation backed to gold.  With 7 billion people on the planet our economy can not be modeled on that of limited resources mined and sold to pay the always expanding interest on money the banksters loan into existence.  Money must be anchored.  Exponential with limited resources doesn’t equate.  Anyone who taught themselves Calculus is smart enough to know this and has to be a psychopath to continue herding sheeple towards the economic cliff.

Alan Greenspan

Education: Julliard School.  Hitler taught us the world needs more artists, even if their art sucks.  N.Y.U. B.S. economics, M.A. economics, dropped out of Columbia (to follow Burns to DC to learn how to chase power and powerful positions). PhD N.Y.U.  His NYU dissertation—removed upon his request when in 1987 he became Chairman of the Fed.  One copy remains out there and it includes a discussion of soaring housing prices and their positive effect on consumer spending. It even anticipates a housing bubble and collapse.  He noted that homeowners were refinancing for larger amounts than their original mortgages, monetizing their appreciation and then spending the excess cash on goods and services.  Economists had missed this trend.  He also wrote in his now secret dissertation,

“There is no perpetual motion machine which generates an ever-rising path for the prices of homes.” …”break in prices of existing homes would pull down the prices of new homes to the level of construction costs or below, inducing a sharp contraction in building.”

In his 1966 Objectivist article “Gold and Economic Freedom”, which stated (link),

“In the absence of a gold standard, there is no way to protect savings from confiscation through inflation.”

Which makes it clear that he knew what was going to happen when created massive inflation as we saw in the housing bubble.  In the 2000s he signed the original article and told Congressman Dr. Ron Paul that he still believed in everything in it.  Greenspan is, without a doubt an economic terrorist.

Employment: Worked for Dr. Marc Faber who had to re-write Greenspan’s crap, Faber later said Greenspan should have never been Chairman of the Board of Governors Federal Reserve System, which he was from 1987-2006.  From Sheehan’s fantastic book, “Panderer to Power: The Untold Story of How Alan Greenspan Enriched Wall Street and Left a Legacy of Recession”

Mark Faber, Hong-based investor and author of the monthly Gloom, Boom & Doom Report, could see far enough ahead to move to Asia in the 1970s.  He remembers his meetings with Alan Greenspan (when Faber still worked in New York): I was put in charge of research liaison for White, Weld’s overseas offices…My job entailed…attending the monthly economic presentations [by Alan Greenspan]…When Mr. Greenspan first came on board at White, Weld as a consultant, 30 or 40 people from the firm’s various departments would attend the meetings.  Within a few months, however, attendance had dropped to just a handful of White, Weld employees.  By then I had also learned that the easiest way for me to communicate the (to me) incomprehensible remarks of [Greenspan] to our overseas offices was smply to summarize the previous day’s news from the front page of the Wall Street Journal”.

Failures & Collateral Damage: Flooded the world with dollars during the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998 which contributed to the two biggest bubbles in the world, the Dot-Com bubble and the Housing bubble.  Muzzled Brooksley Born (who headed the CFTC from 1996-1999) when she wanted the CFTC to regulate derivatives before they became a household word, admitted to Congress in October 2008 that his free-market ideology shunning regulation was flawed, this after his dissertation lambasted the Fed for allowing any one psychopath to have too much control of the monetary system.  Ramrodded the Gramm-Leach Bliley Act (1999) wich obliterated the Glass-Steagall Act put in place after the last depression to prevent banks from gambling deposits on risky investments. Link.

 

 

 

Larry-”I Lost $1,800,000,000.00 for Harvard Betting on Derivatives”-Summers:  He’s got some other serious claims to fame, Obama is considering him for the top post at the World Bank, he helped Alan Greenspan muzzle Brooksley Born and fell asleep at White House Economic meetings during this, our Second Great Depression.Link.

Bestand:Joe Biden - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2005 Portrait.jpgOur “Administration” who admits that the Obama Administration asked Jon Corzine for Economic Advice. Why not Madoff?:  Right after Obama & Biden got in the White house these economic imbeciles faced with a financial crisis called—drum roll please—MF Global’s Jon-”I Bet My Clients’ Money on Greece”-Corzine for advice on what do do.  You can watch the short YouTube video here.  

 

While Clinton went with Rubin who was an ex co-chairman of Goldman Sachs for his Treasury Secretary he later developed strong ties with Jon Corzine of MF Global.  Rubin was cut out of the same cloth, he told Clinton not to regulate derivatives and sent Summers barking after Born.   Another Harvard and London School of Economics genius.

GE’s CEO (Who Obama has as its head as his Council on Jobs) took money in bailouts, owns MSNBS and CNBS and GE Capital slashed about 11,000 jobs or 10% of its workforce, you can read about it here.

 

 

Hank Paulson $10 maybe up to $34 trillion given to his buddies for blowing up the economy and blasting us back into the Second Great Depression.  Ex Goldman CEO.  Dartmouth and Harvard.  He and Bernanke proved clueless about UK BK laws when they forced Lehman into BK. Link & link & link.

Paulson and Bernanke had not consulted with other governments and didn’t understand the consequences of foreign bankruptcy laws. Under British law Lehman’s London office had to be closed immediately.  

The “Financial Media, Experts and Professors” 5%

 

 

 

 

Maria Bartiromo who lets Bernanke slide with his “I don’t agree with your premise, housing prices have never declined on a nationwide basis,” “answer” to her “Is housing in a bubble?” question.  $1 million a year for a salary and she lets the most important question in economic history fail.  People who relied on “uneducated angry economic bloggers” soon realized who the uneducated economic morons really were.Link and link.  This is critically important also because Bernanke’s book had been out for quite some time (2000) and in it he lists states across the country with declines of up to 60% in housing.  But, more importantly, Von Mises is clear on how a bubble of this magnitude ends, link.  And then the FOMC minutes were released showing the Fed as klouns laughing about housing being in a bubble.

 Cramer was on YouTube explaining how, when he was a hedge fund runner he manipulated the market.  CNBS really picks them. Link.

 

 

 Dr. Nouriel Roubini who decorates and sculptures his walls with female private parts, whose economic research firm is on the block after losing $2 million dollars and is famous for calling gold a barbarous relic as it doubled and out performs virtually every other asset class. Link, wonder why his economic research firm is 8 figures in the red?

Mishkin who teaches Economics at Columbia got paid $124,000 to write a report on praising derivatives in Iceland, after the Icelandic crash caused by derivatives he renamed his report on his CV from “Financial Stability in Iceland” to FinancialInstability in Iceland.” Link.

…And the list goes on and on.

 

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To answer your question yes,

To answer your question yes, there is hope for a College Student like you.  The biggest thing is always think of a backup plan to your backup plans and you'll come out better then most others.  If you have an idea of what to immediately do in case of XYZ... than you have better chances than most everyone else.  If you are prepared for it, then you are ahead of even most of the people on these forums.  =)

Start by asking yourself, what would I do in this situation and go from there...  Where will you go?  What would most people that live around you do?  How would people act when they are panicking and what would they do?  How will I eat/drink/keep warm?  The answer to most preparation questions revolve around "Maslow's Heirachy of Needs" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs

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Punch cards and programming

Ah, coding on punch cards! I learned programming in FORTRAN that way at Georgia Tech. That was fun, taking your stack of cards to the card reader and waiting for the print out to see if your program ran or you had to figure out where you coded wrong! Not to mention paper "Teletype" style terminals and FAST 1200 baud small green screen video terminals. Those were the days. I must have been on the tail end of them still lteaching with punch cards.

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Doug
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Let me add

I'll give you a little of my bio as, perhaps, a little guidance.

I have a Bachelor's degree and a grad degree.  But first, I served in the US Navy where I learned to be an electrician.  That got me a lot of jobs once I did my time.  It paid my way through college and, through an unusual set of circumstances, opened an opportunity to go to grad school.  Btw, I enjoyed electrical work more than anything I've done before or after college.

I would prefer to see a robust system of trade schools, some of which is filled today by JCs, and robust 4 year colleges that require, in addition to your specialization, heavy doses of liberal arts and science.  IMHO, the goal of a 4 yr institution should be to produce what used to be called 'Renaissance' men (now people).  Scientific and technical pursuits I view largely as trades.  There may be a lot of highly complex and theoritical work, but in the absence of a liberal arts context, they are essentially trades.  We are graduating a lot of bots who can't put what they do in the context of social, historical or ethical frameworks.  OTOH, we also graduate a lot of liberal arts majors who are scientifically illiterate.  Both extremes are dangerous.

We tend to revere the founding fathers.  The question that occurs to me is whether they would have done as well as they did in the absence of well rounded educations, whether they got them through institutions or some other means.  I think not.

Doug

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xseo93x
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 Thank you all so much for

 Thank you all so much for all of your feedback! I didnt expect so many responses in such a short amount of time. Yes I know all of the massive criticisms that economists receive along with politicians, but those all just appear to be acts of corruption or just delaying reality rather than being illogical and whatnot. It just seems disappointing that what I found to have a true and wholehearted passion for may very well have an unsure future.

I started off as a computer engineering major, but I just found economics to be just so darn interesting and fascinating to the point all I can talk about is our economy and the crises we will face. Perhaps it's because of my professor because this man can teach better than any man i've ever learned from. His very difficult exams I am able to earn Bs from compared to the class average of 65% scores had also built my confidence that economics was the major for me. Yes I agree 100% with Chris Martenson's idea that we must now look at energy and environment. My current professor also teaches the environmental economics course, so I am very sure that he is not like the "Bernanke Helicopter" because he talks about how stupid he is as well as all the other historical leaders who caused hyper inflation.

The man whom I learn from economics from is definitely a "good economist." A famous economist from the past, Henry Hazlitt describes the difference between a  good economist and a bad economist. The "bad economist" looks at only the immediate outcome of actions and if beneficial will most likely support it, while the "good economist" looks at all secondary effects, including pollution which is what a good economist does look at. The bad economist's views are usually shortsighted and do not look at possible problems in the future. For example, most common people may view that building a fuel efficient car that can run like 100 miles per gallon would be extremely beneficial for our economy as our energy costs would decline. Though this maybe the case at current consumption, people will eventually realize that they can go out and drive more than they used to and start travelling more, thus eventually using practically the same amount of fuel, but causing extra congestions on the roadways, which would indeed be problematic leading to further issues, but I think I made my point. Yes there will be plenty of rotten economists out there, but they just simply do not follow the basic principles. The energy crisis back in the 70s, though I was not part of it, was caused by price controls or the price maximum of oil along with natural gas. Same goes for the rent controls in New York, more than half a century ago. The plan that caused the energy crisis was endorsed by a "bad economist" and when Reagan came to the White House, the good economist comes in and ends the energy crisis through the lifting of price controls. It is the issue of economists that do not adhere to such basic principles that cause problems like this. Every sane economist would know that increasing money supply relative to our goods and production is never good! It's basically a hidden tax on our savings cash and fixed wages!!

To sum the massive previous paragraph up, I believe that some people have just simply come to generalize these economists who have become as corrupt as politicians with the few good ones out there that actual adhere to such basic rules. I guess it's a tad bit hard for me to give up economics in college because I have such a yearning passion and want to make a difference in the world, though it may not be huge, I want to help others and warn others as well. My mind these past few weeks have been going all over the place, perhaps it is the pressure of my parents who want me to succeed and be well off. I do not want to disappoint them after they gave up so much coming to the US.

If I manage to build myself a good financial base and the economy along with peak oil doesnt get out of hand by then, I do plan on heading to a country that is less dependent on oil. Bolivia would be my first option as I absolutely love the people there, being a place where I can see lower standard of living, but higher quality of living. I hope you forgive me for my excessive writing and some errors in my writing. Also if you would for any reason want to see who my professor is, he is inverviewed on goldmoney which is where I also found out about Chris Martenson :] so I am quite sure he aware of all of these issues. Thank you everyone once again for the feedback and please do leave more if you have more inciteful words to tell me!!! I TRUELY do appreciate the time some of you have put into responding!!!!

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Wendy S. Delmater
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Re: most formal schooling

Davos is my new hero for using the phrase "weapon of mass dumbification." Oh, yes.

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Davos
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safewrite wrote: Davos is my
safewrite wrote:

Davos is my new hero for using the phrase "weapon of mass dumbification." Oh, yes.

thx, I stole it from a commenter on one of my articles 0hedge ran :-)

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George Mason University? and Econ?

 My dear young college student.  I am utterly shocked that my esteemed fellows here on this board are not aware - perhaps you are?  George Mason Univeristy is the AAA league, farm team for the Koch Brothers.  The Economics department there is world renown for producing bright eyed and bushy tailed young cogs in the absolute free market or nothing, Ayn Randian, so conservative libertarian that we are really almost anarchists school of thought.

I was regaled at length by a young person from George Mason not that long ago that the econ department there was very supportive of the student Anarchic-Capitalists group.  I was very well behaved and did not snort at all.  Anarchic capitalists?!  As in capitalsim with no laws whatsoever.  As in Somalia.  (The oh no it would not be Somalia argument was that somalia had been interferred with by outside nations. Well of course it had,  any group that has no ability to defend itself will be rpeyed upon by those within and without,  that would be part of the role of law and military)

I was vastly amused by the innocence of young people being taught what is, at its very core, a world view that is every bit as idealistic as that of any raving communist.  In both cases people are placing a full house bet on the basic reasonableness and rationality of humans.  At what point, pray tell, in history have humans ever shown the slightest ability to retain rational behavior if let off leash?

Sanity is found in the balance of powers between the people, business and the government.  This is most certainly not being taught at George Mason.

A good college, once upon a time, was not an expensive trade school, as has been noted here before.  If you can swing it,  do so, by all means.  I don't think collapse will look like what many here expect,  but I am also prepared if I am wrong.  Things are changing really really rapidly.  Almost anything you learn in college now will be obsolete before the ink on your diploma is dry.  So, learn how to think critically.  Learn what basics we really know (economics is not one of them as economic theory absolutely cannot be proven regardless of how well they dress it up.)

Google your university's name and Koch brothers.  Ask yourself if you really are willing to pay to be brought into their team.  The story of liberal bias in the university setting just as the story of liberal bias in most media is a story that once was true but is no longer.  The conservative view point already won the war they are still fighting.  Many colleges have long since sold their souls to corporations like Koch to bring in funding and spit out young people with degrees in environmental science that insist climate change is not occuring and that oil is forever......  

Be young.  You are the only option the rest of us old farts have.  Know this:  we srewed this thing up royally.  The smartest thing Einstein ever said was that you cannot solve a problem with the kind of thinking that got you into it.

Cut your own path.  Good luck.

 

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ao
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a contrarian view

I'm going to disagree with some folks here.  If you want to become an economist (or be employed in the economics field) and have a passion for it (which it sounds like you do), go for it!  You can spend your life worrying about what will happen and living defensively or you can forge ahead and shape your life to be what you want it to be.  Don't let fear and negativity hold you back. 

For what it's worth, my son is also interested in economics as a career and I'm encouraging him to pursue it.  He understands what is occurring but also wants to be part of creating change.  An education is more than just getting a job.  It's about becoming a well rounded, balanced human being.  I'm in full agreement with what Doug said about becoming a Renaissance man. 

A university education is giving my son opportunities that I never could give him.  He's a sophomore now and has been involved with regular volunteer work with the disadvantaged in the inner city on weekends (learning skills like rebuilding homes, building greenhouses, putting in gardens, helping out at a soup kitchen, etc.) and recently came back from a spring break spent working with AIDs and HIV patients in New Orleans.  He has met famous politicians including Clinton and Obama and been interviewed on local TV for his political views.  He got to meet George Clooney and was an extra in his movie.  He has been attending lectures from various religious groups ranging from Muslims to Mormons expanding his spiritual outlook.  He participates in a variety sports from basketball to ultimate frisbee to kayaking and also has had an opportunity to go to every football and basketball game and get involved in school spirit and comradery.  He has met a variety of people from different backgrounds, races, religions, states and countries, and developed a broad range of friendships and contacts.  He is taking two languages including Arabic and will be studying overseas next year.  In other words, he has been expanding his potential and growing as a human being outside the area of his core curriculum.  From the standpoint of cost, we do have to fork out some money but due to everything from his grades to becoming an Eagle Scout, he got over $45K in scholarship money which has helped out considerably.

On the other hand, a college education isn't for everyone nor should it be.  Good vocational training can provide one with an excellent career.  But if your heart and your talents don't lie in becoming an auto mechanic, don't become one.  Do develop skills but don't waste your time on trying to overcome all your weaknesses and becoming all things.  Spend your time capitalizing on and developing your strengths.  Obviously, one of the primary roles of education is to learn HOW to learn.  While I couldn't agree more with Davos about the importance and value of self-education, autodidacts are the exception rather than the rule and a good mentor, in any area that you choose to excel in, is invaluable in accelerating one's education and growth, however it may be obtained.  Your best investment at this stage in your life is in yourself and your education.     

Make your decision based on your heart as well as your head.  If you only consider practicalities, you'll likely regret it later in life.

P.S. Your second post demonstrated a nice improvement in writing quality over your first post.

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capesurvivor
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college

Lots of good perspectives here, I'll give you one more. My son developed a serious chronic physical illness in high school that caused him to become pretty pragmatic and develop a low BS tolerance. He went a year each to two different universities, became president of the entrepreneur club of the second one, then dropped out. He did so by coming to my wife and I with a business plan to open a personal fitness center with a unique orientation, for which he had obtained training. We gave him the remainder of his college money to buy equipment and rent the place. It was a difficult decision for my wife, who has two master's degrees, but a no-brainer for me, and I have a doctorate, because I realized our son wanted to be an entrepreneur and never work for anyone else. He made a success of the business for three years, sold it, crossed the country to CA, land of the entrepreneurs, starved for a while, and now makes six figures in a company he started with several other entrepreneurs he met. The lesson I would take from this is, don't leave college unless you have the personality and inclination to be an entrepreneur, want to learn a specific vocational skill, or will work hard enough to be in the top 5% of your profession when you graduate. My son is a great reader, though he buys his books and I get mine from the library, LOL. While I think exposure to a few other academic areas might have been good for him, it wasn't in the cards and we both will do ok without that happening.

CS

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xseo93x
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Thank you all once again!

 I would like to thank you all once again for your inciteful responses to my post! I can see there are mixed thoughts and opinions within this post, but I shall take all thoughts under consideration.

In response to Land's response about the Koch family and George Mason University, I am very much aware of the fundings we have received from them over the past 2 decades. Indeed I can see their donations at work through numerous renovations throughout our school which has been nice. Their influence I would say however, has not been too far on the radical side within our economics department. You raise the statement that George Mason does not teach its students about sanity being built between the people,  business, and government, but this is precisely what I have been taught throughout my first year.

From what I have learned from the passionate professor I've been learning from for the past two semesters, the role of the government is to maintain protection of private property, the people and prevent crime within our market system. When that system is stabilized the relationship between people and businesses will naturally lead towards cheaper prices and more productivity, benefitting both groups. Of course there will be companies that can no longer compete and go bankrupt, but their resources can simply be reapportioned to somewhere they can be more suitably productive. One common statement I hear from so many that is just downright ignorant is the statement that rockefeller was an evil monopolist as Rockefeller never owned 100% of the oil industries. In fact his stand oil empire started to decline before the government decided to charge him under anti-trust laws. If people were to look into details we would see that Rockefeller even lead to improvements that cheapened oil for its consumers. In our current times we can see how anti-trust laws took interfered with AT&T buying out T-Mobile which ended up hurting both companies and also reduced the possibilities of receiving cheaper data services. Through this we may say there indeed is an inbalance between the three groups with government being the fool. This is however just my theory from these statistical facts, so I have no way of saying this is 100% true.

As for our oil crisis and beliefs that the market will not solve this, I have some hope and faith that natural gas cars will be integrated within our society saving us from the increasing gasoline prices along with gasoline shortages. Honda is currently are working on natural gas civics which may enter mainstream market within a few years, though it is currently quite expensive. People may claim that this will fail as the price of the car is just downright too expensive and subsidizing it through the government will increase budget deficits, since those subsidies do come from our tax money... Despite the immediate outlook of the natural gas engines, I have wholehearted belief that our brilliant engineers and businesses will develop ways in order to reduce the prices of these natural gas engines, thus reducing the costs and increasing the benefits from purchasing these natural gas. When the demand for these natural gas cars increase, then other companies will join the bandwagon in making these cars for new profit. Yes I know oil is used for numerous other things and this is just a small piece of our oil problem/predicament and writing about other issues would most likely take many many paragraphs, so I will stop here! :]

I suppose the influence may vary among different professors, but there is only so much you can do to change the true beliefs and ideologies of any person, especially with monetary fundings. My thought and opinion, as I am still only a freshman in this university, is that I will indeed see the influence of this "Anarchic Capitalism," but I will be prepared to learn it and hear those ideas, but that does not necessarily mean I will allow it to become part of my ideals, unless it truely strikes me as the better way, but I probably will not in the end. As Dr. Walter Williams of George Mason University said, Government is inherently evil and the founding fathers knew that, so they restrained the powers of the government through the Bill of Rights.

So my conclusion is that I will indeed keep my mind open and unbiased to better options and alternatives, but for now I can't possibly let my love and passion be deterred by a couple of bad economists. Among those rotten fruits there's always bound to be some good ones! Thank You to the previous few posts that have offered me the perspective of caring and loving parents, I truely appreciate it oh so much! Yes, I am currently learning to educater myself in various topics, I am hoping within the near future to relearn my spanish and perhaps decide upon perhaps improving my korean and learning another language as well! Though its a big goal, I need big things to look foward to in order to achieve big things right? I will continue my research expand my range of knowledge, so that I may better select my decisions on the long run. Land, if I had for any reason offended you through my massive response to the Koch family topics, I hope you would forgive me as I meant no harm through it. I am very much aware of their pollution and legal issues, which is where I find my distaste for them.

If anyone has any response to some of the topics I may have raised in this response, I would absolute LOVE to hear them (no sarcasm intended) as I'm always ready to learn something new ideas :]

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land2341
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Please consider

 Since you said this: 

 

I suppose the influence may vary among different professors, but there is only so much you can do to change the true beliefs and ideologies of any person, especially with monetary fundings. My thought and opinion, as I am still only a freshman in this university, is that I will indeed see the influence of this "Anarchic Capitalism," but I will be prepared to learn it and hear those ideas, but that does not necessarily mean I will allow it to become part of my ideals, unless it truely strikes me as the better way, but I probably will not in the end. As Dr. Walter Williams of George Mason University said, Government is inherently evil and the founding fathers knew that, so they restrained the powers of the government through the Bill of Rights.

 

 

I ask you to please go to the thread on Defending Atlas Shrugged.  Also, please give some consideration to reading Predictably Irrational by Daniel Ariely.

Government is inherently evil is a very strong statement.  Nature abhors a vacuum.  Societies cannot function without some form of governance.  yes, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.  But, be very clear that you understand the differences in the freedom to do what I want and the freedom from the oppression of other people doing whatever they want......

It is easy in this time of severe government oppression to lose sight of what can happen when you remove its reins entirely.

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Full Moon
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Posts: 1258
psychology

  There  is always going to be a need for this and as time goes on  even more so .     You can learn about the ego  and why some people thrive while others colapse .     Think of the jobs in the military sector .If all else fails you might be able to talk your way out of some wicked situations and figure out who is your Judas  .

 Anyway might as well go with something fun and interesting .    Studying all the whacks  who have gone before us and made History .

 FM

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Full Moon
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What ?

 Did I say something wrong ??    PTSD is NOT going to go away ....    You could take it as a challenge to see how you can get other peoples money from their pocket into yours without too much guilt .   Hey and  for those that need to build up their own ego the challenges could be endless.   Really  what else could be driving  most of the ones in power and  control ?? 

   It could keep a person busy a very long time .

  FM

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xseo93x
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Posts: 11
 Thank you Land for the

 Thank you Land for the suggestion on the reading, I will definitely put that next on my reading list very soon! It should be interesting to compare it with Ludwig Von Mises' book on human action. As for that paragraph you referred to let me appologize how I wrote that out. I should have been a bit more elaborate on that. I do have a solid understanding on your points and I can understand where you may have thought I was being biased or unclear. Also, just to clear my thoughts a bit for me, would you mind telling me your standing terms of your view on economics and economists? I couldn't really grasp where your true standing was from what you have been saying. By all means please be honest as I will not take anything you say personally! I'm just very curious...

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ashleyw
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 If you are interested in

 If you are interested in entreprenuership, consider reading this book:

http://thecelebritycafe.com/reviews/2012/03/nothing-lose-everything-gain...

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Poet
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Posts: 1891
18 Years Old And Scared Shitless

You may also want to take a look at another forum topic and the dozens of replies to it, which was started 11 months ago by a young person also seeking advice:

18 Years Old And Scared Shitless (April 14, 2011)
"After watching the short film about the Fed through the above link, watching the Crash Course, reading Chris's recommended books and all the while paying attention to the news (not MSM), I AM SCARED SHITLESS

"I'm 18 years old and soon I'll be going to university. As of now I plan on double majoring in Philosophy and Economics, with the intent of going on to Law school. My dad, luckily, has saved up enough for my undergrad education and told me he won't need to take out any loans. That said, is it a good idea for me to go to university and then later to Law school in the current and impending economic climate?

"Basically, what can someone still in high school do to ensure future well-being in the face of current global predicaments?"
http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/18-years-old-and-scared-shitless/56453

Poet

gregroberts's picture
gregroberts
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Government is inherently

Government is inherently evil is a very strong statement. 

 

Any time some person is given the power to force some other person to do something they don't want to do, what would you call it?

Nature abhors a vacuum

Really? Isn't outer space part of nature and mostly a vacuum?

 

Societies cannot function without some form of governance. 

 

Speak for yourself

 

yes, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely

 

 

So if you believe there is a God, it would be corrupt?

But, be very clear that you understand the differences in the freedom to do what I want and the freedom from the oppression of other people doing whatever they want......

Like people in govt?

It is easy in this time of severe government oppression to lose sight of what can happen when you remove its reins entirely.

It won't happen overnight, people first have to learn to take responsibility for their own lives and not expect others to help them involuntarily.

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