Survival Gadgets and Tools

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capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Survival Gadgets and Tools

I am not an economist and, truthfully, not particularly interested
in economics beyond the CC. Thus...no contributions in that area. I
HAVE had an interest in coping with disastrous change ie. survival,
since the 70's when the country was in raging turmoil and the
survivalist movement originated. I will share my ongoing interest in
gadgets and tools, often low tech, that make life easier and contribute
to well being. Many of these I already use daily and hope to use after
TSHTF. If a book is incredible, feel free to post, though another
thread has these. Post other websites that can be helpful in this area.

Let's assume that firearms have already been considered; I don't
want this thread to become a discussion about the best caliber to use
for various actions. You will notice that I am partial to lights and
knives; the former critical to maintaining civilization, the latter,
our oldest tool. Please feel free to contribute any items that you
think are helpful or will be, perhaps where they can be obtained, and
what they might cost.

I will start off by suggesting you all subscribe to the free
following listserv: www.kk.org/cooltools/. Amazing stuff you never
heard o; some have been of great use to me.

Another great place is www.bogolight.com. You buy one solar rechargeable light and pick a developing country for them to send one. I have both the SL1 and new SL2 version; I'm not sure the SL2 is better, though it has many more lighting options.

I'll end with a great item now on sale at my local T.J. Maxx for $3. closeout, a wind-up flashlight. I have one of these in my car and have given them to all family members. No reason for it to wear out and better than lighting a kerosene lantern or using disposable batteries to check stuff outside at night or in the basement.

I will stop there and hope other folks have some useful tools to post, no matter how big or small or unimportant seeming.

 

GLTA

 

SG aka Capesurvivor

 

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Amanda V
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Hi Capesurvivor

Was just typing up my new forum topic on things to collect when you posted this !  They are very similar in terms of ideas for things to collect.  Great minds think alike!  I like your wind up flash light suggestion. 

Great idea too to ask if other readers know of other links and websites to get useful stuff.  I will keep an eye on this post and go shopping !  Thanks.

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

woohoo my type of forum :)

I dont have the brains for all the economics stuff and nor do i wish to develop the brain lol whats the point of learning about something that likely will not be here.

I am more into the pratical physical things. 

www.dreampot.com.au - as a mum - this gadget is just awesome for cooking all sorts of meals with very little power :)

Mix it with this little item    http://www.kellykettle.com/   and you have hot water - netween the two items - you can go anywhere and still provide the family with an awesome meal.

Two terracotta pots - some sand and water make an awesome fridge but i have mentioned that elsewhere in this forum. 

A battery - an inverter and a small solar panel to charge the battery and you can still watch a video or recharge batteries or run a fan. 

I have shake torches and also the windup one but i also have a little 2 watt led light that can run of the inverter.

 

 

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Rosemary Sims
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I think the bogo light is absolutely fantastic.  I'm from hurricane country and if I had know about it, it sure would have saved me a lot of pain & heartache over the years.  I also have a windup flashlight as a test but didn't know when I got it that rechargeable batteries have a "memory" of the past charge and will never charge higher than that last charge, or so I understand.  The cheapo I got doesn't seem to hold a charge very long but would do in a pinch.  But why would I need it if I have bogo lights?  Amazing bright solar powered LED's that are much brighter than any LED bulb you can buy.  And the charge seems to last forever.

I wish that Leatherman were not so expensive or I would have one now, but I have a max Swiss army knife and a charming very small solid brass hammer which has a screwdriver with different heads in its handle. My only saw is an old Felco pruning saw which can cut 5" in about 3 minutes with two hands and good maintenance. Actually I have two.  Most of my really good tools have been lost over time except for my massive mallet which is really ancient.  But on my list to get are a really good digging fork or two (very hard to find), a machete, truly one of the great tools of the universe if sharpened and maintained (even the cheapies), the best shovel or two I can find, a Global Sun Oven,  a hand crank Red Cross radio and a few cooking untensils appropriate to the solar oven.  I already have solid aluminum trowels (IMHO, the only kind that last) of varying sizes and two pairs of Felco #8 pruners.  I have stones to sharpen everything.

I have been unable to find a good ole fashioned can opener but keep my eyes peeled locally. I'd like a water filter straw although I live in a small watershed not likely to get polluted whatever happens, but I can't find them for sale on the net.

Rosemary

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pinecarr
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Good topic, capesurvivor!  I've been wishing there was a place for everyone to pool these kinds of ideas!

Here are a couple of links with things I've looked into:

www.thereadystore.com  - emergency supplies (lights, radios, emergency kits, water purifiers, MREs, freeze dried food, etc.)

http://www.lifesaversystems.com/aboutus.html - good water filter that claims to be able to even remove viruses

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Rosemary Sims,

The leathermen tools are over-priced and of generally poor design. Gerber makes a far more "user friendly" multi-tool, which allows one handed use. I'd STRONGLY advise it.

Another tool which any survivalist should have in their "go bag" is the "Pocket Chainsaw". An net search should yield a quick find, it's a phenomonal device.

For a good fixed blade knife, "Cold Steel" makes oustanding, high carbon blades that hold a decent Edge.
I've got experience with both the SRK and Recon Scout. I'd recommend them highly as a "hard use" tool.

If you're living rurally, consider:
-bone saws
-Cast Iron Cookset; especially dutch oven
-Meat grinders
-Cider press
-Hand tools; Hoe, shovel, pick axe, splitting maul, wood axe, wedge, hand saws and drills, a good quality claw hammer and lots of nails... the list could go on and on... post holers, fencing, lumber, pipes and fittings...  

Cheers!

Aaron

PS - I'll try and get links and prices later - I'm out of town and have a lousy connection.

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stpaulmercantile
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Kerosene Cookstoves, Water Heaters, Lanterns, Water Filters, etc

I've been running a website for 11 years that caters to the self-sufficient, family preparedness, survival folks.  It is www.stpaulmercantile.com  I sell many types of kerosene cook stoves, plus an oven that allows you to bake on your kerosene stove.  I have a high-powered kerosene lantern (300-400 watts), some railroad lanterns, and will soon have some solid brass oil lamps.  Also crank-powered flashlights, solar and crank-powered emergency radios, and water filters that use long-lasting ceramic filters to remove bacteria from water. 

My main business is ventfree heaters and fireplaces (most do not require any electricity to run), but the preparedness items actually outsold the heaters in December for the first time ever.  My (preparedness items) sales doubled in 2007 and doubled again in 2008, especially since October, so this market is really heating up.

I have also put together a Family Emergency Kit that I've been selling for two years now.  It bundles a large number of items together into a package and applies about a 30% discount. 

I am in the process of releasing a completely new re-write of my website tonight and probably over the next couple of days.  This involves thousands of files, so if you run into problems, just try again. 

Now is the time to develop alternatives for lighting, cooking and heating that do not require electricity.  I'm always surprised to see how communities turn into disaster areas when the power goes out for a couple of days.  There is no need to be a slave to the power grid.  I use plenty of electricity, but if it went out, I could survive the entire winter without help. 

I've primarily been a "seller" rather than a "user" of the preparedness items for the past decade, but when I took the Crash Course a few months ago, I decided it was time to get serious, so now I am writing a Family Preparedness Plan that will be implemented throughout 2009 that will require us to use all the stuff I sell at least one day a week so we get more first hand experience with the tools.  One goal is to reduce our electricity usage by 50% this year, for two reasons.  One - the cost of energy will be going up in the coming years, so it's time to start using less of it.  And two, we are in an excellent location for installing wind power, but it is quite expensive, so if we can reduce our load requirement by 50%, the solution becomes more feasible. 

I offer free email advice at [email protected] , so email me if you have specific questions, or post them here and I'll check back periodically. 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Rats,

I can see that I'm going to obsess over this thread and keep checking the posts. I guess there are worse things over which to obsess.

Rosemary,

I have used the same P-38 can opener (on my keychain) for over 40 years since a Marine Corp neighbor gave me one. You can get them here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/5-P-38-Can-Opener-Military-Surplus-Camping-Survival-NEW_W0QQitemZ290291942133QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item290291942133&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1205|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318|301%3A1|293%3A1|294%3A50

They are satinless steel and indestructible but buy a few. You will build up a lot of strength in your thumb, LOL. Best for emergency/camping use.

I got a cheap Leatherman on ebay because Sara Lee had imprinted it for a giveaway to someone! Check ebay for everything (not sure if you are overseas from U.S.-postage a bit steep, then).

 

As I think of it, I find the best garden tool to be an adze, pick mattock on one side, hatchet-type thing on the other. Can chop brush, make a furrow, etc.

 

GLTA.

 

SG

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Hi Aaron,

Great post, thanks. For a good value folding knie, get a Doug Ritter. Made by Benchmade.

I actually like the Leatherman but have not tried the Gerber.

 

SG

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Rosemary Sims
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

"The leathermen tools are over-priced and of generally poor design.
Gerber makes a far more "user friendly" multi-tool, which allows one
handed use. I'd STRONGLY advise it."

Thanks, Aaron, I'll look into the Gerbers.  They just seem like such nifty tools, especially under moveable stress, but then I've always been a tool freak.  I used to have wonderful knives of hard steel - plain wooden handles with brass rivets.  I used them for over 40 years but alas no longer have them.  When I think of knives, I think of butchering er, edible meat, which I used to do quite often as I've always bought meat in bulk.   Cheapo that I am.... 

"-bone saws"

Aaron, have looked closely at what butchers use (we actually have those who don't electrically saw frozen meat here) and think my good ole Felcos will do the same job - tiger teeth, hard steel and better design.

"I have used the same P-38 can opener (on my keychain) for over 40 years "

Thanks for the link capesurvivor!  I'll go on the look.  I had this perfectly wonderful, very simple can opener for many years - you know - the 1950-60's sort with the black handle and heavy steel "digger" and cap remover.  I haven't seen one in ages and it surely was the most efficient can opener of all time.  My Swiss Army opener is not really easy to use but is great in a pinch, as is the corkscrew. :)

"As I think of it, I find the best garden tool to be an adze, pick
mattock on one side, hatchet-type thing on the other. Can chop brush,
make a furrow, etc."

Maybe that's because you've never learned the art of the machete?  Actually, I don't think I've ever made the acquaintance of a adze.  I heard from my grandmother this was a "yankee" tool of ill repute. In case you haven't heard, we don't have rocks down here, only balls, expecially on the ladies.  :-)

"cider press"

Ok, Aaron, I'll keep that in mind, and maybe use it to press sugar cane rather than apples which don't produce here because of our hot nights.  I'll trade you some rum for some apple cider though, ok?

Thinking about the suggestions here, I think a pry bar of at least 4' would also be a really good thing.  Here, they were always called crow bars and are still used in demolition of wooden buildings, etc.  They are useful in so many ways.  They are a particularly good weapon in particularly gruesome times, and can be wielded by a woman, but are so innocuous and useful....

I'd also like to get a good manual mill, of the flour type as I am a
baker at heart, but I don't have much of a clue about where they are
available.  Sharon Astyk helps with her descriptions of the differences
in the mills, but I don't know a source.  We must have bread even if
Bunny goes down, no?  I am very happy in my new location to be in Cajun
country as opposed to New Orleans (although my heart is still there). 
While New Orleans is a phenominal place to see how life is really
lived, here in Cajun country, a much poorer area, there are a great
many things that have been done for so many years that they are second
nature here and there are not many lost skill sets.

Rosemary

 

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Rosemary,  I have the Back to Basics Hand Grain Mill on this page. 

 http://beprepared.com/category.asp_Q_c_E_460

It worked fine for the 5 or 6 test loaves I ground the wheat for.  I was surprised at how long it took to grind 4 cups of flour.  People would appreciate food more if they were more connected to it's creation.

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I'll put in my shameless plug for any hand tool that you don't have. This means a basic carpentry and machine work type set.

-Hammer

-Full set of wrenches and sockets

-Variety of screwdrivers

-Chisels

-Mallets

-Sledgehammer (1 small, 1 large)

-Hand drill

-Drill bits, including a set of hole saws

-Pliers, wire cutters, wire strippers, linesman pliers, channel lock pliers

-Pipe wrench

-Propane torch and MAPP torch with solder and braze

-Work gloves, safety glasses

      Those are the big ones that hit me now. With home construction down and recession pricing, I bet you could find some deals at a hardware store. Pay the money and get decent wrenches and drill bits in particular. The harder metal that is used will avoid rounding off and dullness for years to come and is well worth the investment.

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Thanks MarkM!  That's the one I was looking for.

Rosemary

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I have used a lid for long term storage in 5 gallons buckets called gamma seal.They snap on in place of the regular lid( I have to stand on mine to get them to seat!)and provide a screw off rubber gasketed lid.They are awesome!

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

If your starting from scratch - a 4 in one screwdriver. The simple one with single reversible shaft and two sizes of flat head or phillips bits on either end. A tool rather than a gadget.

My wonderful tool minded brother gave me a RoboGrip - a clever combination of pliers and wrench - it actually works great as either. It's a Craftsman brand so I'm not sure if he got it Sears or somewhere else. Another desert island must. Really, trust me.

On the household side - I've been collecting wood and bamboo items from garage sales. They don't break and get better with use. Wooden salad bowls in teak or koa used to be popular tourist items. Bamboo for utensils actually seems better than wood - doesn't get grungy if it sits wet. Lots of bamboo on the market for cheap these days too - plates, cutting boards, and "sporks" (spoon on one end fork on other) and may be an import that disappears as more international SHTF.

Somewhere in this thread I saw recommendation for a two sided silicone spatula. I've experimented with some silicone utencils and think they're great. A good iron skillet and one good spatula. Voila.

Thanks for this post - I'm bookmarking many of the recommendations.

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

How about those super-long-two person saws they used in the eighteen-hundreds for logging. I can think of no better mass wood cutting tool after peak oil, save for, perhaps, a solar powered chain saw.

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capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Great to see this thread is still alive.  I will try to keep interest by posting more often.

I like to post things  that are low tech, durable, and infinitely usable but I have found this flashlight (sorry, but I warned you all about my obsession with lights and knives) so helpful that I've bought one for everyone in my family.

http://www.herringtoncatalog.com/ts142.html. Perhaps obtainable elsewhere also.

Walmart actually has a similar small led very similar to it for only $2. but the ASP has a lifetime (I know, after TSHTF they will probably not honor it) replacement and they have flawlessly replaced several of mine, once after dropping it on a street and having it break into numerous pieces, a statistically odd event given that it is pretty sturdy. Still, two buck for 8 of these may beat $16. bucks for one with a lifetime warr.

You decide.

 

SG

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I'm wondering how long time keeping will be a neccesary function of survival.I'm hunting for my old wind up wrist watch and going to buy a wind up alarm clock I think.

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

How about this:

American Red Cross FR300 Emergency Self-Powered AM, FM, NOAA Weather Band PLUS all new TRIPLE LED (2 White LEDs for light, 1 for Red LED Emergency Flasher) Bulit-In Flashlight AND CELL PHONE CHARGER!

http://www.nitro-pak.com/product_info.php?cPath=46_351&products_id=1611&...

Run out of power and the batteries are down? No problem, the hand cranked generator works great. I played with them when I volunteered for the Red Cross. And you can get one for just over 30 bucks if you walk into a Red Cross office.

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I have something like that but that is cool news about getting them from the Red Cross.

In terms of watches, I too, have wondered about the need for them. I posted, I think, about my solar powered Casio, which still  is functioning fine though the battery has slipped to medium charge after no real sun exposure since last summer.

 

SG

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Hi John at St Paul Mech-

I'm down by Austin MN and I have been a promoter of "off-the-grid" living for about 12 years, though we keep tweeking our system and are not yet ready to let the spa tub go, I'm sure we'll have to give it up one day.

I wrote one of my sites: http://MyBackAchers.com for long term survival tips but it is no way complete. It's about our Zero Energy Farm and:

  • how we are going with out refrigerators/freezers via use of ice houses,
  • wind generator for what electrical we do use (would like a big one) and
  • eventually (wishlist) a large enough greenhouse for fresh food for us, the chickens, rabbits, goats and horses during the winter.
  • We even got a little crazy and turned our toilet into a methane gas digesting system (and I'll be ordering some pressurized lamps from you once we get digesting and if I find I can digest enough gas - then maybe one of those fireplaces will be on my list).    We're not yet ready to give up toilet paper but have sprayers on the toilets. What's really cool about this is a regular toilet flushes 3 gallons and this one uses a pint or less. A lot less work on the well.
  • Our website also describes how to make a solar / wood fired food dryer out of an old refri - the older the better since the old ones have less plastic to remove. .
  • It describes a system where we take the heat from our attic on sunny winter days and use solar panels to move the heat to the main living area. That takes some modification of the attic but the attic heats to over 90 degrees - even in winter. Yes, it is a black roof.
  • And it describes some permaculturing low maintenance food production. We used no mowing grasses around the property to cut our energy and work load down by 80%. We also let the animals graze it in the fall.
  • What I have been looking for and not finding is a low energy wash machine. Since wind generation will be our main form of power I want very few batteries to complement the system so as not to double the cost. 
  • We're in process of planting the hybred poplars for easy to cut wood heat (electric chains saws running off our electric tractor and solar panels). 

I could really get carried away with trying to supply everything but I think I am running out of time.

As you'll see from our site, we're going for the long term - since we think we'll be "on our own" for years - up to 12 was my best guess.  What we can't grow during that period of time, we are trying to stock up on. . . coffee, tea, spices, CHOCOLATE and a few other items.

One thing I have seriously been thinking about lately is that AFTER TSHTF, the fields around us may be left empty so that would be agreat time to really expand food production. 

Well back to work . . We'll never know what we've got till its gone. . . . EndGamePlayer

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Hi End, 

Thanks for interesting post. 

One thing I found out today (you may know) is that old refrigerators, pre-self-defrosting, and especially those with fans on the top (real old) use much less electricity than the new ones. I know if SHTF electricity for any frig is dicey but thought I'd let you know.

 SG

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I might add that a really old school way of air conditioning is an "absorbtion cycle" heat pump. The end result is refrigeration, but there is absolutely no electricity required - only a heat source. Some of the few units that are made now use natural gas, propane, etc. But it is conceivable that in the future the systems could be bodge-adapted to use nearly any fuel as a heat source. Perhaps wood, coal, etc. Just a thought. As a result of the fact that these only require heat and have no moving or mechanical / electrical parts, my guess is that they would be nearly bulletproof in terms of reliability, though I dod not have any direct experience. Certainly worth looking into.

Mike

 

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

EndGame,

Thanks for your post - I'll look through your website one evening while I'm playing poker online.  I moved from St. Paul to the mountains in western Maryland.  It's not quite as cold here, but we actually get more snow than St. Paul - 10 feet vs 6 feet annual average.

You are way ahead of me with your preparations.  I look forward to reading the details about what you've done.

 

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

This post speaks to the old Boy Scout idea of being prepared and occured to me only because two low frequency/high consequence events happened within a 1 hour drive from me. Both have very different endings.

I've carried a pocket knife for decades, usually a small Swiss Army knife because, shamefully, I surreptitiously use the little  tooth pick occasionally. At other times, I carry a Leatherman Wave or Doug Ritter folder if I'm going on a walk or not wearing work clothes. A few weeks ago a fellow near my town was in his car going through a car wash when he saw that the female attendant had become entangled with one of the whirlers and was being strangled by her scarf. He opened the door in the middle of the wash, ran out, and cut the scarf with his pocket knife, saving her life, as she was already unconscious. After mouth-to-mouth, she was fine.

A few weeks later, a man walking on an escalator to the Boston subway saw a women fall and get caught by her scarf and  start to strangle. He did not have a knife,yelled for help, but no passersby stopped. He tried to rip the scarf but couldn't and watched helplessly as she strangled to death. He looked angry and traumatized to me on tv. Reminds us of Kitty Genovese being killed in NYC decades ago while 39 people heard her screams and did nothing. Aside from the shameful lack of  community response in case two, the other lesson ...carry that pocket knife!

A third instance I just remembered was when an acquaintance of mine watched two young guys burn to death in their car because they couldn't unfasten their seatbelts after it burst into flames at a toll booth. A knife to cut the seat belt could just save your life or someone elses. There are also gadgets that smash the window and cut the belt you can leave in your car (I have one).

Just a friendly tip from your former local former Boy Scout. I have surrendered (and later retrieved) my pocket knife to security people when entering court as a witness. I don't care what people think.

 

SG

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suziegruber
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I recommend Lehman's for all kinds of hand tools, especially those used in the kitchen.  They are at:

http://www.lehmans.com/jump.jsp?itemType=CATEGORY&itemID=677&iMainCat=677&iSubCat=677

 Their catalog is really fun.

 

Suzie G.

Northern California

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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools
capesurvivor wrote:

Great to see this thread is still alive.  I will try to keep interest by posting more often.

I like to post things  that are low tech, durable, and infinitely usable but I have found this flashlight (sorry, but I warned you all about my obsession with lights and knives) so helpful that I've bought one for everyone in my family.

http://www.herringtoncatalog.com/ts142.html. Perhaps obtainable elsewhere also.

Walmart actually has a similar small led very similar to it for only $2. but the ASP has a lifetime (I know, after TSHTF they will probably not honor it) replacement and they have flawlessly replaced several of mine, once after dropping it on a street and having it break into numerous pieces, a statistically odd event given that it is pretty sturdy. Still, two buck for 8 of these may beat $16. bucks for one with a lifetime warr.

You decide.

 

SG

 

I don't know why there are not more examples of this....

http://www.solar-led-flashlight-usa.com/solar_led_headlamp/solar-led-hea...

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Hey,

 

Great posts, folks,never heard of Lehmans before and didn't know they had solar leds for head lamps!

 

SG

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PlicketyCat
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Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

Lehmans also has those nifty kits that will turn any mason jar into an oil lamp, and floating wicks to make "olive oil lamps" but which also work wonderfully in fat lamps  (a tin can full of lard or tallow). They also sell kits and a "how-to" guide for getting domestic hot water from a woodstove. Very good stuff!

Things I've found useful in my survival kit:

  • LED-Flashlight w/ AM/FM radio, hand powered (shaken not cranked)
  • Water purification tablets and a portable solar still --- don't forget the canteen
  • Firestarter (in fact, I have several different kinds)
  • Can opener (both crank and punch type)
  • Sewing kit with extra needles and safety pins (once used this to fish!)
  • Mylar emergency blanket
  • Multi-tool (I have a Swiss Army Knife, Gerber and Leatherman)
  • Hatchet and pocket saw (either a folding one or a coiled one)
  • Entrenching tool (folding shovel & pick)
  • Folding rain poncho (useful for sooooo many things if you get a thick one)
  • Rope (any kind will do, but several diameters and lengths never hurts!)
Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I'm with PlicketyCat on this, my "Go Bag" or SHTF bag, has pretty much the same as her's. With some exceptions, mine also includes, my Springfield XD, Holster and Ammo, and a Remington 870 Magnum(for my immediate"Go bag") and Ammo in the bag, and my Gerber Knife (I hacked a small tree about 3-4" thick down) in 2 swings of it in, it's good http://www.gerberstore.com/index.php?xpage=itempage&xid=757) that also doubles as a hammer, and you can tie it to the stick you cut down for a spear,, GPS and cellphone. Solar chargers are great if you have time to set up, wait to charge and tear down, but if you need that power now, then you're out of luck.

There's  a lot of stuff that people are discussing that needs a lot of space, and weight that might not be effective from a "GO" perspective if you don't have transportation.

On that  note, I'd recommend a real go bag, that's minimal, get you out of Dodge fast, and safely for a few days, and a "Go with the truck bag" that contains much more than just the immediate essentials, for me this is the remaining firearms, and all my ammo, cleaning supplies, parts kits, and reloading gear. Medical Supplies, Pots, Pans, MRE's changes of clothing and footwear, Water plenty of it. Seeds for vegetables, and some seed potato's, Fishing tackle and nets. Here's where I'd be putting the Solar chargers, and a power inverter to run off the trucks cigarette lighter, and a small 3kW or so Gas Powered Brushless Generator. Laptop, (charged by the Solar panels, inverter, or Genny) some gardening tools, chainsaw, and felling branching axes, and some logging tools (hooks, and haulers), maybe a battery operated power drill (I can charge while I drive or with the Genny), this is basically a small set of tools that you can take and set up somewhere else for an extended period perhaps years, and maybe build an effective shelter,It does require that you're out in the sticks, since the majority of your long term protein is from hunting/fishing, and your carbs are coming from what you can grow (hence longer term). Power is a premium, that in many cases we can live without, yes a refrigerator would be nice, but without a regular supply of Gas that's not going to fly. Later on, if there's wind for it, I can pull the Generator off the engine, and raise it up as a wind turbine.

So the "Go bag" is for is for the immediate "get out" scenario, and the "go with a truck bag" needs about 3 days of notice. 

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Survival Gadgets and Tools

I agree with you Gungnir - you need a "go" bag like a backpack or duffel bag that you can personally carry for immediate survival; but it's wise to have several bags/boxes/trunks packed with long-term survival stuff that could be loaded up in a vehicle on relatively short notice.

Anyone seriously considered a potential bug-out situation, especially one involving more stuff and a vehicle, should probably start obtaining stuff and running drills now.  You can't expect to be able to acquire, package and load up everything that you'll need at the last minute... best to do as much as possible ahead of time and practice your load-up drill.  You'd be amazed at how little space you might actually have in your vehicle, or how much space some of your gear actually takes up if you haven't drilled it a few times beforehand.

When I lived on the coast in NC, our town used to have these drills once or twice a year before hurricane season. Drills and prior planning are pretty critical when there is more than one person involved and you might not be in the same place when "disaster strikes"... do you all go home, do you meet somewhere else, what happens if you can't rendevouz, how long do you wait, who's responsible for bringing what stuff, etc etc.

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