Some things that are super cheap now but will be ridiculously useful post-collapse

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fiorgodx's picture
fiorgodx
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Some things that are super cheap now but will be ridiculously useful post-collapse

 Hey guys, I'm trying to leverage my money by loading up on things that are inexpensive now but will be resource/time consuming or impossible to create in a post-collapse world. Lets put together a list of things we can buy now IN BULK that will be very valuable in the future. Here are some of my thoughts:

-Blankets - seems like it took a crazy amount of time to make quilts back in the day. and you can never have too many blankets
-Warm clothing/gloves/boots/socks/clothing in general
-Soap, toothpaste, various other toiletries
-Toilet paper & paper towels
-Wine! 2 buck chuck from Trader Joes, load up now

A lot of these things can be bought in the $1 range if you're a bargain shopper. What are some other things I'm missing?

tictac1's picture
tictac1
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what about...

what about plastic?  I don't know much about the manufacturing of it, but if it's strongly oil dependent, it might make sense to stock up on poly sheeting and/or tarps that could used for temp shelters, greenhouses, stuff of that sort.  It would be better to hear from someone that actually knows about plastic...

 

Travlin's picture
Travlin
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100 item list to consider

Google list of 100 items to consider.

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&source=hp&q=100+things+that+disappear+first&aq=1&aqi=g10&oq=100+things+that+&fp=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&cad=b

Travlin 

osb272646's picture
osb272646
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100 Items

Pretty good list.  But - - Toilet Paper?  Hasn't anyone ever heard of the "Camp Rag"?

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txgirl69
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a few items...

We have enough personal hygiene items to supply a Wal-mart! Soap, toothe paste and toothe brushes, floss, toilet tissue and paper towels....We have also assembled first aid kits with boxes of bandages (different sizes), bottles of hydrogen peroxide and alcohol, a sutures kit w/ bullet removal tool... disposable gloves by the box..... I have even bought "quick-clot" for severe bleeding... a few bottles of plain bleach.

I have also thought about the rolls of 6mil plastic. Very handy, indeed. I have some that's used, but I should go get a couple of new rolls. - Be sure you keep them out of sun and heat, it will make the plastic brittle and useless....

We have also constructed a gasoline storage cabinet. It contains 12 - 5gallon fuel cans. One for each month. Each month we fill one and use one - on a rotating basis, so the fuel doesn't sit long enough to seperate. When TSHTF, we would have enough fuel on hand to operate small engines for a while or to fill our cars 2x each. - BTW, we always keep everything full of fuel, just in case.... We also have a few 5gallon containers of motor oil and an extra filter for each vehicle and the lawn equipment...

Extra bicycle tires, chains, brake parts...

Extra shop / kitchen and bath towels.... bedding / sheets. We are buying an extra dresser this week for an empty bedroom upstairs...We also have a couple of fold out camping cots up there - we haven't got around to buying the extra beds, yet.... a person may have to bring their own!

 

Good thinking guys!

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dingalls
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how about

matches

baking soda

bleach (someone said that I think)

long burning candles

extra fuel for cook stoves (portable)

hand warmers (oxygen absorbers)

 

katyan's picture
katyan
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Posts: 46
another strategy

Good ideas here! Rather than just stockpiling the things that you currently use, also think about reducing or eliminating many of them, or shifting to alternatives that can be produced sustainably and locally. For example:

- install an inexpensive bidet on your toilet (such as a "Biffy") and keep a stack of small towels or washclothes for drying off
- reduce your reliance on paper towels and get in the habit of reaching for a sponge or cloth instead; old newspapers are great for soaking up grease and icky spills;
- sharpen your razors, and dry them after each use, to increase their life as much as 50 times over
- use deodorant crystals in place of commercial deordorant sticks...they last almost forever and work just as well
- replace hair conditioner with diluted vinegar; try handcrafted bar shampoo in place of bottled commercial shampoo
- use "soap nuts" in place of laundry detergent and vinegar in place of fabric softener
- get rid of most of your commercial cleaners - you can clean very effectively and economically with nothing more than e-cloths (www.ecloth.com), vinegar and baking soda; add a mild liquid soap such as Dr. Bronners, a few essential oils and some CLR, and you should be set for 99% of household cleaning tasks
 

The other thing to think about is replacement parts that might be hard to come by in the future. I've been attempting to develop a list of priorities based on the parts most likely to break, cost and probable future availability. Of course, so many products these days can't be repaired at all (good ole planned obsolescence) that it is also a good idea to find alternatives. After having to throw out the third electric weedeater in as many years, I vowed to never buy another one. After a good bit of research I bought a custom-fitted European sythe from Sythe Supply (not cheap up front, but a lifetime investment). One might assume that using a sythe is very hard. In fact, using a well-designed blade and correct technique, I find it much easier and the whole experience is more like peaceful tai chi in contrast to the noise and flying debris of a power weedeater.

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ao
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katyan wrote: - get rid of
katyan wrote:

- get rid of most of your commercial cleaners - you can clean very effectively and economically with nothing more than e-cloths (www.ecloth.com), vinegar and baking soda; add a mild liquid soap such as Dr. Bronners, a few essential oils and some CLR, and you should be set for 99% of household cleaning tasks

I'd probably skip the e-cloth hype and just look for microfiber cloth suitable to your needs.  Typically, automotive supply sources will have a range of microfiber cloth from lower quality to higher quality.  If I need to clean glass crystal clear, I'll go to the higher quality.  If I need to do general cleaning, I'll go to the lower quality.  You'll find other sources cheaper than e-cloth.

ao's picture
ao
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By the way, this thread is

By the way, this thread is somewhat redundant as way back when (2 to 2 1/2 years ago), there was a thread on a similar topic.  It was focusing on things we'll need in the future, not necessarily from a price perspective but obviously, in a post-collapse world, virtually all these things will be more expensive.  I don't have the time or inclination to look for it now but if you search, you'll find it.  IIRC, it was much more comprehensive than this thread.  That was when people like Gungnir and Plinkety Cat were contributing some excellent information. 

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katyan
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ao wrote: I'd probably skip
ao wrote:

I'd probably skip the e-cloth hype and just look for microfiber cloth suitable to your needs.  Typically, automotive supply sources will have a range of microfiber cloth from lower quality to higher quality.  If I need to clean glass crystal clear, I'll go to the higher quality.  If I need to do general cleaning, I'll go to the lower quality.  You'll find other sources cheaper than e-cloth.

I have used both run-of-the-mill micofiber and e-cloths, and it is my opinion that e-cloth products are of superior quality and work much better. After I saw your post, I actually tried a cheap cloth and an e-cloth side by side on the gunk our dogs leave on the walls - no comparison.  The term "microfiber" has no defined standard, so the quality can vary tremendously. I have used other cloths made specifically for cleaning electronics that work as well as the e-cloth for glass, but they are thinner...not as well suited for general household cleaning tasks.

There is a multi-level marketing outfit (the name escapes me at the moment) that sells a similar product at a much higher price which I would steer clear of. However, I have no problem investing few dollars in a quality product manufactured to a known standard that will last 5+ years and will more than pay for itself in both cost and reduced environmental impact.

ao's picture
ao
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katyan wrote: ao wrote: I'd
katyan wrote:
ao wrote:

I'd probably skip the e-cloth hype and just look for microfiber cloth suitable to your needs.  Typically, automotive supply sources will have a range of microfiber cloth from lower quality to higher quality.  If I need to clean glass crystal clear, I'll go to the higher quality.  If I need to do general cleaning, I'll go to the lower quality.  You'll find other sources cheaper than e-cloth.

I have used both run-of-the-mill micofiber and e-cloths, and it is my opinion that e-cloth products are of superior quality and work much better. After I saw your post, I actually tried a cheap cloth and an e-cloth side by side on the gunk our dogs leave on the walls - no comparison.  The term "microfiber" has no defined standard, so the quality can vary tremendously. I have used other cloths made specifically for cleaning electronics that work as well as the e-cloth for glass, but they are thinner...not as well suited for general household cleaning tasks.

There is a multi-level marketing outfit (the name escapes me at the moment) that sells a similar product at a much higher price which I would steer clear of. However, I have no problem investing few dollars in a quality product manufactured to a known standard that will last 5+ years and will more than pay for itself in both cost and reduced environmental impact.

Your key word was "run-of-the-mill".  Over the past decade or more, I've used dozens of different types of microfiber clothes from American, German, Korean, Chinese, and other manufacturers (since I'm an avid car buff and do my own detailing and am obsessive about it).  Each has its own pluses and minuses and none of them do everything perfectly, even the highest quality ones which surpass e-cloth.  Believe me, you can buy quality microfiber cloths that will do anything the e-cloth will do for less money ... but you're not necessarily going to find them in your local retail outlet.

And with regards to reduced environmental impact, do you know how microfiber is manufactured?;-)

dingalls's picture
dingalls
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Posts: 28
ao wrote: By the way, this
ao wrote:

By the way, this thread is somewhat redundant as way back when (2 to 2 1/2 years ago), there was a thread on a similar topic.  It was focusing on things we'll need in the future, not necessarily from a price perspective but obviously, in a post-collapse world, virtually all these things will be more expensive.  I don't have the time or inclination to look for it now but if you search, you'll find it.  IIRC, it was much more comprehensive than this thread.  That was when people like Gungnir and Plinkety Cat were contributing some excellent information. 

ao,

I have searched several times for the thread you mention here without success.  Could you please say exactly what you would search for, so that I could do so?  

Thanks.

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