Recipes for food and drink

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cat233's picture
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Recipes for food and drink

Everyone keeps talking about recipes in the Food Storage thread. www.PeakProsperity.com/forum/food-storage-lessons-learned-and-recomendations/19518

Grandma  just posted one, so I thought I would start a separate thread for recipes.

Cat

 

Breakfast Cookies

1 cup lite-size shredded wheat

1 teaspoon grated orange peel

1/4 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

1/4 cup hulled sunflower seeds

1 cup flake cereal such as cornflakes or bran flakes

1/4 cup sugar

2 egg, beaten, or equivalent

1/2 cup raisins

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 to 1/3 cup graham cracker crumbs (about 3 square crackers)

Crumble shredded wheat in a plastic bag.  Place crumbled shredded wheat in a medium bowl.  Mix in orange peel, walnuts or pecans, sunflower seeds and flake cereal.  Combine sugar, eggs and raisins in a medium saucepan.  Sir over medium heat until mixture thickens, 3 to 5 minutes; do not scorch.  Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.  Add shredded wheat mixture; mix well.  Cool slightly.  With lightly floured hands, roll 1 rounded teaspoon of mixture in to a ball.  Roll in graham cracker crumbs.  Place on a platter or baking sheet.  Repeat with remaining mixture.  Cover cookies and refrigerate.  Makes about 20 cookies.

From:  Cooking with Stored Foods, by Carlene Tejada and Carroll Latham

 

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

 For anyone who's looking for something different from canned tuna fish as part of your protein food storage, I can recommend one we've been using for years.  It's the Bumble Bee brand of Alaska Red Sockeye Salmon; in our area the best price is at Walmart and it costs about $4 a can.  The expiration date is always at least 4 years out.  Don't try to substitute something different if you use the recipe I'm giving below because it won't be as good (DH's advice).  BTW, we have no connection whatsoever with the brand or wally world.

 

Grandma's Simply Excellent Salmon Cakes

1 can red sockeye salmon, drained; you can remove the skin if you want to or leave it in for the added fish oil

1 large egg, beaten with a teaspoon of water (you could use powdered egg I suppose)

Using your hands, mix the 2 ingredients real well in a bowl; pinch any spine bones to disperse them into the mix (they're very very soft and full of calcium).  Divide into 4 patties like you would for hamburgers but a little bit thicker.  In a medium size frying pan, heat a little of whatever oil that you like to use for frying foods.  Put the patties in the pan and fry with a lid on using a medium heat and turning after a few minutes; if you try to turn them too soon they fall apart, and if you have your heat too high you'll burn them.  Turn a couple more times and cook thoroughly (because of the egg).  Serve with fresh or bottled lemon juice.          Note:  we used to make these with cracker crumbs as a filler, but they're better without a filler; also, you don't need to add salt to this recipe.

We keep over 2 dozen cans on hand and keep rotating them because we use a couple every month.  We had it tonight and that's why I thought I'd share this with others who are doing food storage.

 

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Flower Butters

Earlier this week, I made the chive butter, thought I would share all of these. 

Cat 

Making any flower butter involves the same process.  First, remove the petals from the flowers and wash them well in cold water--check for critters.  Gently pat them dry in a towel or dry them in a salad spinner.  Using a very sharp knife, mince the flowers and any leaves.  (Mincing is easier if you roll the blossoms into a small ball before cutting them.)  Cut 4 ounces of room-temperature butter into six or eight pieces and then mash them with a fork.  When the butter is fairly soft, slowly incorporate and flavorings and the flowers and leaves.  With a rubber spatulas put the mixture into a small butter crock or decorative bowl.  Refrigerate until serving time, Flower butters can be frozen in sealed containers for up to two moths.  All three recipes make a little more than 1/2 cup.

From:  The Edible Flower Garden by Rosalind Creasy

Nasturtium Butter

4 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature

12 to 18 nasturtium flowers

2 to 4 fresh nasturtium leaves, or a few sprigs of fresh parsley

3 or 4 chives (optional)

 

Chive Blossom Butter

4 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature

10 to 12 large, barely open common chive flowers, florets (petal clusters) separated

2 small sprigs of fresh parley, or 8 or 10 large chive leaves

 

Rose Butter

4 ounces unsalted butter (1 stick), room temperature

1 teaspoon superfine sugar, or finely granulated sugar (sometimes called bartenders' sugar)

1/4 teaspoon almond extract

Generous handful of rose petals from the fragrant old-fashioned types (2 tablespoon of chopped petals)

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Cream of Celery Soup

I always seem to end up with loads of celery, or other odd and leftover veggies that I can never figure out what to do with before they go bad. Since we make a lot of stews and casseroles that need a base, when I stumbled across this soup recipe I was in heaven.  Sure, you think "ewwww celery soup" ... but this is really yummy and a great way to use up any veggies (not just celery, I made the same soup with cauliflower and broccoli).  This is a huge recipe, so I normally freeze or can it in pints and quarts... which is perfect for 2-4 people.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 quarts chicken or vegetable stock
  • 3 pounds celery, coarsely chopped  (you can sub in almost any green or root veg)
  • 1/2 pound carrots, julienned
  • 1/2 pound onions, chopped
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour  (potato or rice flour and cornmeal also work as long as it's fine)
  • 1 tablespoon salt (to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon ground white pepper (to taste, you can use black pepper it's just not as "pretty")
  • 3 quarts hot milk (I normally split this 2 qts milk, 1 qt heavy cream or unsweetened condensed/evaporated milk if all I have is non-fat or skim milk)
  • 1 cup butter (or margarine... but it tastes better with butter)

OPTIONAL

  • You can add any mixed veggies - just add 1 qt of stock & 1 pint of milk for every additional lb
  • Add 1 teaspon of cayenne pepper, ginger or curry for zing
  • Add 1 cup grated parmesan, queso fresco, gruyere or mozzerella and this becomes a wonderful "au gratin" base

DIRECTIONS

  1. Pour the chicken stock into a large pot, and bring to a boil.
  2. Add the celery, carrots and onion to the pot.
  3. Whisk together the flour, salt, pepper, and milk; add to the pot along with the butter.
  4. Boil for 10 minutes, or until vegetables are soft, 
  5. Cream the soup by pressing through a sieve, or using a blender
  6. Serve warm or cold -- makes approximately 32 one-cup servings 

(added bonus -- this works just as well with dehydrated veg & powdered stores as with fresh ingredients -- just make sure to reconstitute everything before you measure!)

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

I'll add a drink.  Peppermint sekanjubin is our favorite long-storing, simple materials, super-refreshing summer drink.  Sekanjubin is the Arabic name (widely used in the SCA, or Society for Creative Anachronism) for a syrup-based drink containing vinegar and other flavoring agents.  A traditional American variant is switchel, there are also various recipes known as shrubs, and similar drinks are usually referred to as oxymels when the flavoring agents are also intended to be medicinal.You can make any of these drinks using any number of flavoring agents, but our favorite is peppermint:

Dissolve 4 cups sugar in 2 1/2 cups of water; when it comes to a boil add 1 cup wine vinegar. Simmer 1/2 hour. Add a handful of mint, remove from fire, let cool. Dilute the resulting syrup to taste with ice water (5 to 10 parts water to 1 part syrup). The syrup stores without refrigeration.

More variants:

http://qctester.wordpress.com/2006/11/09/honey-ginger-syrup-sekanjabin/

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Strawberry-Ginger-and-Mint-Sekanjabin/Detai...

Essentially, we think of it as old-school gatorade.  Really great stuff.

 

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Lima Bean Fritters (two ways w/variations)

This one's for Cat & Dogs :)

Lima Bean Fritters

Ingredients:

  • Oil for frying (see *Methods for amounts)
  • 1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white sugar
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten  (or 1 tbsp of whole egg powder mixed with 1 tbsp of water)
  • 1/2 cup milk  (or 4 tsp of regular [not instant] milk powder mixed with 1/2 cup of water)
  • 1 tablespoon shortening, melted
  • 1 1/2 cup lima beans (see **Bean Prep)

**Bean Prep: You can make these with either fresh or dried lima beans.

  • If using dried beans, soak overnight, rinse well, boil in salted water until barely tender (about 10 minutes) then mash lightly with a fork.
  • If using fresh/previously frozen beans, you can use them as is if they are small, or you can blanch them in salted water for 1-2 minutes and mash lightly with a fork, depending on your preference.

Method 1 - Deep-fried Dumplings (Hush Puppies):

  1. Heat approximately 3 cups of oil in a heavy pot or deep fryer to 365 degrees F (185 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Beat together egg, milk, and melted shortening; stir into flour mixture. Mix in the lima beans.
  3. Drop fritter batter by spoonfuls into the hot oil, and fry until golden. Drain on paper towels. (optional, sprinkle lightly with salt immediately after removing from oil)

Method 2 - Pan-fried Cakes:

  1. Heat approximately 1 inch of oil in a skillet on medium-high heat to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Beat together egg, milk, and melted shortening; stir into flour mixture. Mix in the lima beans.
  3. On wax paper, spoon mixture into several "pancakes". Using a spatula, place cakes into skillet of hot oil and fry 5 minutes on each side or until golden. Drain on paper towels. (optional, sprinkle lightly with salt immediately after removing from oil)

Variations: Using the same basic ingredients and methods as above, you can also make Succotash Fritters (corn & lima beans): Replace half the all-purpose flour with corn meal, and replace half the lima beans with sweet corn. These can be lightly dusted with sugar instead of salt and served as a dessert.  *If using dehydrated sweet corn, reconsitute first!

P.S. This works great with Garden Peas, too!

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Socca/Farinata & Pannelle - Garbanzo Bean Flour "fritters"

Grinding into flour is another creative use for those dried beans in your long term stores. You can replace up to 25% of the flour in any recipe with a bean flour, and some recipes use only bean flours. (I recommend getting a good gluten-free cookbook for more recipes using bean flours, as you can't seem to find them much anywhere else these days).

Socca/Farinata (pan-fried cakes)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups chickpea flour
  • 2 cups cold water
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus extra for cooking
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary (or 1 tsp dried)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions:

  1. Grind dried beans through flour mill until fine (you can use coarser grinds, but the cakes will be denser and crunchier)
  2. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and whisk until large lumps of flour are incorporated and mixture thickens slightly, about 5 minutes; do not overmix. Cover and rest in the refrigerator or cool place at least 1 hour.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Once the pan is hot, add about 1 teaspoon olive oil and swirl it around to coat the pan. Add 1/4 cup batter and quickly rotate the pan to spread evenly (so it’s thin like a crepe).
  4. Cook about 3 minutes, or until socca is slightly brown on the edges. Run a spatula underneath to loosen socca from the pan, and remove from heat. Repeat with remaining batter.
  5. Season with black pepper and serve.

Pannelle (deep-fried "toasts"): 

Ingredients

  • 3 cups water
  • 2 cups chickpea flour*
  • 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt (preferably Sicilian)
  • 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 cups olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Directions:

  1. Lightly oil an 8- by 4-inch loaf pan (6-cup capacity) and line with parchment paper, leaving a 2-inch overhang at each end.
  2. Whisk together water, chickpea flour, sea salt, and 2 tablespoons oil in a 2 1/2- to 3-quart heavy saucepan until smooth, then cook over moderate heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon (to prevent lumps from forming), until very thick and mixture pulls away from side of pan, 20 to 25 minutes. Transfer mixture to loaf pan, smoothing top. Cool, uncovered, then chill, surface of mixture covered with plastic wrap, until firm, at least 3 hours.
  3. Lift chickpea block out of pan using parchment and transfer to a work surface. Gently flip over block and discard parchment, then pat dry. Cut block crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices for panelle.
  4. Heat 1/2 inch oil (about 2 cups) in a deep 10-inch heavy skillet until it registers 375°F on thermometer, then fry panelle in batches, carefully turning occasionally with tongs, until golden and puffed, 3 to 5 minutes per batch, and transfer to paper towels to drain. Keep warm on a baking sheet in oven while frying remaining batches.

Serving Suggestions for Socca/Farinata & Pannelle:

  • Spread with soft goat cheese and sprinkle with sliced olives and capers
  • Add a dollop of Ricotta and sun-dried tomatos
  • Spoon on salsa or a savory chutney of your choosing (pannelle is excellent with spicy Tex-Mex salsa [Dogs!])
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Re: Lima Bean Fritters (two ways w/variations)
PlicketyCat wrote:

Lima Bean Fritters

 

Just the name of this recipe scares the beans out of me! 

 

 

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Re: Lima Bean Fritters (two ways w/variations)
c1oudfire wrote:
PlicketyCat wrote:

Lima Bean Fritters

 

Just the name of this recipe scares the beans out of me! 

 

 

ROFL - wimp!!

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Re: Lima Bean Fritters (two ways w/variations)
PlicketyCat wrote:

This one's for Cat & Dogs :)

Lima Bean Fritters

Thank you Plickety... I will let you how it goes with Dogs, and me for that matter!

Cat

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Re: Lima Bean Fritters (two ways w/variations)
PlicketyCat wrote:
c1oudfire wrote:
PlicketyCat wrote:

Lima Bean Fritters

 

Just the name of this recipe scares the beans out of me! 

 

 

ROFL - wimp!!

 

Youbetcha!

 

 

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

Really guys, they're pretty much the same as corn fritters, you can barely taste the limas at all... it's not like I'm trying to feed you fire-roasted tarantula (which is actually kind of tasty BTW).

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Re: Recipes for food and drink
PlicketyCat wrote:

Really guys, they're pretty much the same as corn fritters, you can barely taste the limas at all... it's not like I'm trying to feed you fire-roasted tarantula (which is actually kind of tasty BTW).

Pass the tarantulas, please.  Hold the fritters, I think I'm about full up ;-).

 

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

Hehe - when you travel enough you get exposed to all sorts of foods you never thought you'd eat. Especially if, like me, you don't want to offend your hosts by refusing their food. I always figured I could manage to choke down at least one bite of just about anything. I've been pleasantly surprised to find some palatable preparations for ingredients that I normally despise... and of course, realizing that, yes, I really can eat spiders, snails and maggots if I'm hungry. Once you've eaten real bugs, lima beans and chickpeas pale in comparison LOL!

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

Plick -

Having been stationed and deployed in and around Scotland and Scandanavia I have eaten (and enjoyed) haggis and cured shark (okay, didn't so much enjoy that one),

BUT I WILL NOT EAT GARBANZO OR LIMA BEAN FRITTERS.

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storage food recipes, a collection

 For anyone who's interested in accessing storage food recipes, a large collection has been assembled at this site:   http://www.newfluwiki2.com/diary/151/   

If you scroll down the comments section, you'll find even more links to parts of the collection.  It may surprise some of you who are prepping for a major, culture changing, economic meltdown to discover that there is a fairly large group of people out there who are doing similar prepping but for a different trigger -- in the above link it's a global lethal pandemic.  Of course there are also those who are prepping for other strange and exotic global meltdowns and they are often humorously referred to as the tinfoil hat brigade.  Whatever the reason, storage food recipes seem to be popular across all the prepper type internet boards.

 

Amy, I made the drink that you posted.  Our whole family loved it!  We have several containers of mint growing in our garden and your recipe gives us a whole new way to use it this summer.  Thank you.

 

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Amish Oatmeal

The seminar in Lowesville was held at a camp. I think to most of our surprise, we all found the food wonderful. The following is a recipe for Amish Oatmeal, it was most delicious. Chef Caleb was kind enough to send his recipe.

Cat

We have been really busy up here at the camp with summer season. But for the Amish Oatmeal, it’s all in my head, but I will try and tell you the recipe.
This would be for about a 9” by 13” pan.

6 cups oatmeal, I use rolled oats

1LB DARK brown sugar

1 cup milk or cream

4 large eggs

8 oz Butter, melted, unsalted

Vanilla to Taste

Dash of Salt

Mix the oatmeal and brown sugar together until there are no more lumps of brown sugar left. Add milk and eggs and mix. Add butter, salt, vanilla and mix. Pour into pan and bake at 350 until golden brown.

Sauce:

This is hard for me to put into a recipe since I do it all by sight and taste but I’ll give it a go:

2 Pints black berries

1 cup orange juice

1 Tbls ground ginger

½ cup sugar

Put all ingredients into a pot and cook down until the berries are screaming for mercy. Blackberries have a good amount of pectin in them and as you let the sauce boil, the pectin will start to come out to play. When allowed to cool, it will thicken to the consistency of a compote or loose jam. This is really good on the oatmeal, but can be used on biscuits and toast. If you don’t have any ginger, don’t worry, just leave it out. The ginger adds a nice depth of flavor and a cooling effect for the sauce. Raspberries can be used for this as well.

Chef Caleb

 

 

 

 

 

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Amish & Oatmeal Story

I ordered a 50 lb bag of oatmeal from a stand holder in the Lancaster (PA) Central Market (Historic Central Market) Building. When it arrived and I had paid for it, I asked the Amish girl who waited on me if she had a cart to wheel it outside to my car. "How far is the car?" she asked. "It's practically right out the door" I answered. With that she hefted it up on her shoulder and said "Let's go!" Being a gentleman, I held the door open for her.

Just goes to show what eating an Amish diet will do for you!

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

Jerry Lee,

That is a wonderful story.  The next time you visit, you might try riding a horse or a pack burro and I suspect you would impress the young Amish woman.

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

Thanks for the tip,Lakhota! But if I tried to ride a horse, the impression made would be in the ground where I landed.

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

LOL jerry_lee -- I don't even eat an Amish diet and get the same gentlemanly treatment when I'm hoisting my feed bags :)  I truly appreciate when a nice gent holds the door open for me when I've got an 80lb bag of concrete on my shoulder at Home Labyrinth as well

Cat - that oatmeal sounds YUMMY!  I'm always looking for interesting and tasty porridge recipes that don't contain cinammon!  (it's harder than you'd expect)

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The Definitive FOOD FOR HEALTH Thread

I just finished watching :The Beautiful Truth - I got it from NetFlix but it is also available on:

http://www.gerson.org

They claim they can cure most anything by eating un-processed foods (and coffee enamas) - cancer -(Even in Late Stages), depression, diabetes, diseases, see the site for more details but here's a quick idea:

Quote:

The Gerson diet is naturally high in vitamins, minerals, enzymes, micro-nutrients, extremely low in sodium and fats, and rich in fluids.

The following is a typical daily diet for a Gerson patient on the full therapy regimen:

  • Thirteen glasses of fresh, raw carrot/apple and green-leaf juices prepared hourly from fresh, organic fruits and vegetables.
  • Three full vegetarian meals, freshly prepared from organically grown fruits, vegetables and whole grains. A typical meal will include salad, cooked vegetables, baked potatoes, vegetable soup and juice.
  • Fresh fruit and fresh fruit dessert available at all hours for snacking, in addition to the regular diet.

There's more details on their website. .

Let me know if anyone is trying this - I would really like to know the results. . . Oh and Chris (if you're reading this) be ready for getting hassled by the gov, medical professionals and drug companies. . and FDA - That's if they are really trying to suppress this info . .

EGP

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Re: Amish Oatmeal

delicious indeed!!!! it is more like candy than food . if i ate this i would end up with diabetes, heart disease , and clogged arteries

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Re: The Definitive FOOD FOR HEALTH Thread

max gerson cured albert schweitzer of diabetes at the age of 70 . schweitzer lived to be 90 diabetes free.

i have a friend who used the gerson program and cured herself of breast cancer.....no surgery chemo or radiation.

the heart and soul of the gerson program is the norwalk juicer it is the finest AMERICAN MADE product i have ever seen. they are located 25 minutes north of me in lowell arkansas and have an incredible library of alternative therapies. the key is eating foods rich in enzymes and not killing them. they become inactive at temps above 120 degrees

i would suggest the book "what your doctor may not tell you about breast cancer" by dr. lee it has an excellent section on nutrition.

rule number one eliminate sugar.

high fiber low fat mostly raw very simple.

stop eating american

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

I concur with Joe's admonition to 'stop eating American.'

Another great book is "Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease" by Caldwell Esselstyn,MD

"American diet

baby set me free!

You're no good for me!" -apologies to  Guess Who

 

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

I've always found Dr. Schwartzbein's program worked best for my body.  I tried Gerson first, and my triglycerides, blood sugar and weight went totally weird. Schwartzbein is a less militant Atkins, and she lets you have carbs as long as the are low glycemic load. When I eat closer to her recommendations my cholesterol & triglycerides improve greatly, my blood sugar is stable, etc.

I've researched a lot about human digestion and metabolism, and I think that there are definitely certain groups (phenotypes) who do quite well on mostly vegetarian, or mostly fish, or mostly meats. This normally coincides with the food sources that would have been prolific in the location of your ancestral heritage. But if you take a meat phenotype person and feed them a vegetarian diet, their metabolism is going to get all jacked up and their health will suffer, etc etc and vice versa.

Through much trial and error with a nutritionist and my doctor,  I've personally found a diet high in animal protein, fat, fruit & vegetables with minimal refined sugar and almost no grains to work the best for my body.  The closer I get to a well-rounded hunter-gatherer diet (plus dairy), the better I feel and the healthier I am.  It's not surprising really, since humans are omnivores and our digestive tracts and metabolisms are designed to consume and require a variety of animals and plants. Humans aren't herbivores or carnivores, and we shouldn't be trying to eat like them.

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Re: Recipes for food and drink

 From our member Lakota, a link to the Ogala Sioux Tribe website was given on another thread.  The Native American Recipe section gives these 2 recipes that would be well suited for use with "prep food" ingredients found in an emergency food pantry.  There are many other recipes given and it's a valuable resource that's sure to keep me busy exploring it.

 http://home.comcast.net/~zebrec/NR_Native_Recipees.htm

BREAD - Banaha (CHOCTAW) Contributed by Mornin_

2 cups of cornmeal
1 ½ cups hot water
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon salt
Corn shucks ( boil bout 10 minutes before using)

Mix dry ingredients. Add water till mixture is stiff enough to handle easily. Form small oblong balls the size of a tennis ball and wrap in corn shucks. Tie in middle with corn shuck string, or use oblong white rags 8x10 inches, cut from an old sheet. They are much better boiled in shucks, tho. Drop covered balls into a deep pot of boiling water. Cover and cook 40 minutes. Serve. Indians used to heat hog lard and pour over bread as gravy. Leftovers may be stored in refrigerator. To serve, slice each ball into ½ inch slices and fry in hot fat. Variation: Add ½ cup cooked black-eye peas or red beans to recipe.

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INDIAN FRY BREAD (CHICKASAW) Contributed by Mornin_
2 cups sifted flour
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp baking powder
1 egg
1/2 cup warm water or milk

Sift first three ingredients together and stir in beaten egg. Add water or milk to make soft dough. Round up on lightly floured cloth or bread board. Knead lightly. Roll or pat out ½ inch thick. Cut into strips about 2X3 inches and slit center. Drop into deep fat. Brown on both sides. Serve hot. Good with pinto beans, stew or syrup.

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Spicy Gazpacho

Something to refreshing make with all those summer veggies... I found this recipe at, Old Fashioned Livingoldfashionedliving.com/index.html

Cat

Spicy Gazpacho

Ingredients:

1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper

2 tablespoons chopped onion

1 tablespoon jalapeno, minced

1 tablespoon wine or herb vinegar

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon oregano

1/8 teaspoon tobasco

2 small or one large garlic clove, minced

3 fresh ripe tomatoes

3/4 cup tomato juice

1 1/4 cups cucumbers, peeled and chopped

Place 1 cup of the cucumber and next 10 ingredients in blender or food processor and blend, leaving it chunky. Pour into bowl. Stir in tomato juice. Cover and chill. Serve topped with remaining diced cucumber. Makes 4 servings, but is easily doubled. Plus, if you are using this for a before dinner soup you really don't need a large bowl each. I also love cilantro, with can be minced and added at the end with the cucumber.

by Brenda Hyde oldfashionedliving.com/grill.html

 

JAG's picture
JAG
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 26 2008
Posts: 2492
Salsa Recipe

 

Hi Cat, I'm Happy to oblige with the salsa recipe!

  • Step 1: Preheat oven to 400F (or get the grill heated up).
  • Step 2: Pick only the ripest tomatoes from your vines. I usually grow several varieties and choose a few of each. You will probably need 10-20 total, depending on their sizes.
  • Step 3: I use New Mexico green & red chiles along with a few jalapeno and serrano peppers. Its a little early for New Mexico red chiles, but I had a plant make it through the winter so I had a few. These provide most of the "heat" to my salsa.
  • Step 4: You will need a few limes, small head of garlic, and some cilantro as well. I was lucky enough to have all three available from my garden.
  • Step 5: Cut the tomatoes in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and core. Place each tomato half, open-end up on a sheet pan that was lightly oiled. Process the chiles and peppers the same way, remove the seeds and membranes if you want to reduce the "heat" of the final product. Cut the top of a head of garlic and place the head of garlic on the sheet pan as well. Drizzle a little oil over all the tomatoes, chiles, peppers, and garlic, sprinkle with salt, and put in the oven to roast for 20 minutes. You might want to wrap the garlic in some foil to prevent it from burning.
  • Step 6: After your done roasting, let it cool for 10 minutes or so. While your waiting, remove the cilantro leaf from the stems.
  • Step 7: Once cool, pick up the tomatoes and remove the skins as you drop them into a blender. The skins will slide right off. Be sure to pour the juices that collect within the tomato-halfs into the blender as well. Drop in the chiles, peppers, and squeeze in some garlic cloves as well. If the skin on the chiles comes of easy, I usually remove it as well.
  • Step 8: Add the juice of 1 to 2 limes, a large handful of cilantro leaves, a teaspoon of cumin, a good pinch of salt, and pulse the blender to achieve your desired consistency. 
  • Step 9: I like to refrigerate the salsa for a couple hours, but my wife likes it warm. Its usually the best the next day, so leave some if you can for the next day.
  • Step 10: Grab a few beers, some chips, and some tissues (to blow your nose with) and enjoy! (Guacamole works well to counter the heat. I planted some avocados this year, but it will be a few years until the first harvest.)

So there you go. It seems rather complicated at first, but you will get the hang of it in no time. Growing your own ingredients makes a HUGE difference in the taste. 

BTW, my daughter got a taste of this salsa, and look what happened to her hair!

 

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: Aaron's Chicken

JAG, that looks DELICIOUS!
Chips and salsa are the snack of champions. Hilarious/cute picture of the daughters reaction as well!

It doesn't have a name, so "Aaron's Chicken" will do for now. Since I don't remember where I learned it.

I've got one I'll throw in for the sake of sharing.
Ingredients:
- 2 Chicken Breasts
- 1 Tomato
- 2 Slices Swiss Cheese
- Crushed Almonds
- Olive Oil
- Italian Seasoning
- Lime Juice / Fresh Lime
- White Wine Vinegar
- Garlic

Process:
In a skillet, warm to medium-high, and add olive oil; grate some herbs into the oil as it gets warm, and clean the chicken of excess fat.
Cook chicken in the skillet for about 12-15 minutes, turning often, adding seasonings as needed. A capful of white wine vinegar and lime juice two or three times adds a lot of flavor to the Italian seasonings.

Set oven to Broil;
Once the chicken is well browned, remove from heat and place in a oven safe tray.
Before placing the chicken in the oven, place a slice of tomato over the top of each piece, and a slice of swiss cheese over top of the tomato. Ground some more italian spices (depending on how much you like / used earlier) and put the crushed Almonds over top of the cheese.

Broil chicken for another 5-8 minutes until it's well-done.

Serve and Enjoy!
Goes great with Mashed Potatoes, Asparagus, Zucchini (which can be fried in the leftover spices in the skillet!) or corn.

Cheers,

Aaron

Morpheus's picture
Morpheus
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 27 2008
Posts: 1200
Re: Recipes for food and drink

You ladies rock!

Food is IMPORTANT. And it seems that the ladies here are one step ahead of just basically "surviving". Most of the threads of the ladies posted here are more related to "thrivival".

Thriving, not merely surviving.

Thanks ladies. I love when I see you guys, err.. gals start a thread like this. I wait until they get REAL big and then save the whole thread to my hard drive.

That way I'll have essential "Thrivival" information.

Live, not merely exist, right?

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