ready to buy a hybrid vehicle :)

35 posts / 0 new
Last post
james_knight_chaucer's picture
james_knight_chaucer
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 21 2009
Posts: 160
I'm not sure about Hondas,

I'm not sure about Hondas, but the last car I ever did any work on was a 1994 Saab. (Replaced radiator hoses, and it was a real struggle requiring flexible screwdrivers.)

I now have a 2006 Citroen, and would not attempt any repairs apart from changing a wheel. (There are yellow stickers on the engine warning me not to tamper with it.)

Dutch John's picture
Dutch John
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 50
Older cars

Personally I like cars from the seventies and early eighties. Much further back than 1995... As for European models, a same sized seventies car compared to a recent one, fuel consumption is about the same. But the older car is much lighter and is less complex.  Have a look at the old Volvo's: parts drop off and accessories stop working, but they keep running...

No modern, complicated car for me. It has to be maintained by common tools. Even for less mechanically inclined people, a simple car is easier to maintain than a modern car.

Of course there is some difference between the USA and my country. Here, new cars are about twice the price compared to the USA. So for you it is easier to buy new and dump the old one.

Regards, DJ

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
I'm not sure about Hondas,
james_knight_chaucer wrote:

I'm not sure about Hondas, but the last car I ever did any work on was a 1994 Saab. (Replaced radiator hoses, and it was a real struggle requiring flexible screwdrivers.)

I now have a 2006 Citroen, and would not attempt any repairs apart from changing a wheel. (There are yellow stickers on the engine warning me not to tamper with it.)

Another Citroen owner.....!  In the States?  Mine's a 1997 model, and I pretty well do all the work on it.  I bought it from a friend who bought it really cheap, and had all the suspension spheres checked and/or regassed (this car has no springs or shock absorbers and is ideal for conditions when roads start to deteriorate from lack of maintenance!), and apart from tyres and wheel alignment, getting the aircon checked after I replaced the cooling fans with second hand ones, and an oil leak I fixed myself, it's been pretty well trouble free.  This car cost almost $50K when new BTW!  It's easily the nicest and most luxurious car we've ever ever owned

It's definitely my last car...  Australia will be out of oil by 2020 (in fact it's bound to be sooner than that) and I can't see that we will still be driving around here in five years time...  and I'm utterly convinced it will be tyres that will become the definitive criteria as to whether we'll be driving around as fuel gets rerouted to farming/military/emergency services.

Re Hondas, I swear by them too.  We've had two, one was an Integra (Accura in the US?) and we did 400,000km (~250,000 miles) virtually trouble free, never even changed the radiator hoses!

Mike

Mtlgooberdad's picture
Mtlgooberdad
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 5 2017
Posts: 4
Hybrid experiences

I have to drive for work and do at least 35,000 km (22,000 miles) a year.  Our family has 5 people and we have 1 car, so I need a big car that has good fuel efficiency.  I owned a 2011 Hyundai Sonata HEV had no major issues with it.  It gave me the same fuel efficiency for the entire time that I owned it (Nov 2012-Mar 2018 177,000 kms) ; it was a great car. 

As I need a reliable vehicle, and with the interest rates rising and inflation set to spike I decided to replace my Sonata with a 2018 Honda Clarity Plug In hybrid.  It is a 5 seater, with better trunk space than my Sonata.  It has 80 km of electric range and can get 50 mpg when running on fuel on the highway.  So far, it uses very little gas (like a Volt) but provides long range capabilities with the 1.5 liter Atkinson engine.

I have the challange of a cold climate (Montreal) so it is nice not to have the range limits.  Electricity in Quebec is 100% renewables (Hydro and wind) so we're less reliant on fossil fuels for power generation.

Diesel is interesting with the Bio-Fuel option, but from what I've read it really does depend where you live.  Bio-diesel can also present challenges in the cold if the oil gels.

How cheap your electricity is, what your budget is and probably many other factors that I'm not thinking of all contribute; so there are lot's of "right" answers.

I wanted to write in to let you all know that the Clarity is an interesting way to drastically cut your fossil fuel consumption while not having to pay a great deal of money for an electric with a long range.  Bigger than a Volt with Honda reliability.

Will post again once I've put some more miles (kms) on it.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments