Photos from my village in western Greece

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Subprime JD's picture
Subprime JD
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Posts: 562
Photos from my village in western Greece

With all the news about Greece going down the crapper with its busted economy, I still cant help but think to myself that this place in the world would be a very nice place to live in the event of a turbulent future. 35 inches of rain per year, excellent soil, and underpopulated. Humans have inhabited this area for thousands of years so I see no reason why we wont live here in the future. The town is called Monastiraki. From what I've recently heard, people from the city are slowly beginning to return.

 

Here's some pics:

This photo  is taken from the valley. The town is to the right side about 800 ft in elevation higher.

 

One of the many streams in the area:

 

A side view of the town of Monastiraki.  Population: 1800

 

A view towards the mountains:

 

And of course the goats lol

 

A typical footpath through the homes. Notice the vineyards on the left.

 

These old homes would house 3 families as they are subdivided. You can buy a place out here today for as little as $20,000.00.

PastTense's picture
PastTense
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

No people?

Subprime JD's picture
Subprime JD
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Posts: 562
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

Roughly 1,800. These pics were taken by a photographer. I'll post more later

Ken C's picture
Ken C
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

The only pic I see is the "footpath"

Undecided

bluestone's picture
bluestone
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

Beautifull.   reminds of the chaparral areas of southern California (esp in the avocado country north of San Diego).  Leaves me feeling a little depressed.   Now living in cold snowy upstate NY

 

aggrivated's picture
aggrivated
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

I've been to a similar village , but with less water and good soil.  The biggest problem seems to be overcoming the 'outsider' mentality.  Do you speak Greek, are you Greek Orthodox, etc,?  It is similar in many small towns the world over, but I think I'll keep looking in my home country.  But where do you find such a beautiful balance between the old and the beautiful in the USA?

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Johnny Oxygen
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Posts: 1443
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

Any jobs?

Ken C's picture
Ken C
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

I can see all of the pics now. I don' t know what happened before.

 

It certainly is a beautiful place.

 

Ken

 

Subprime JD's picture
Subprime JD
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Posts: 562
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

Some more photos:

Election time in September 2010:

Bottled water company, Korpi. Amazing water by the way, so yes Johnny Oxygen there are jobs lol. The majority of the production goes to thirsty middle eastern countries.

 

And in the event that oil production crashes as a result of wars or any other disturbance we have the horses. My grandfather and parents used to use the horse to go to the fields. Sometimes they would walk a good 30 minutes. However, the place is full of horses!

 

And for the grand finale, a photo from one of the many mountains in the area. So green and lush, yet so few people. A perfect place to ride out the storm in the event that it comes.

 

Johnny Oxygen's picture
Johnny Oxygen
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Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

Gorgeous

Are the people giants or are the horses small?

Subprime JD's picture
Subprime JD
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Posts: 562
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

I talk to my family out there on a weekly basis. Times are very difficult and gasoline has gone through the roof. However, becuase the people travel such small distances it doesnt have much of an effect. In fact, most people walk in the town when buying groceries or other necessities. Nearly everyone has a garden with chickens, vegetables and fruits. My cousin who lives in athens, the capital, STILL after 7 yrs of leaving gets her monthly supply of feta cheese, produce and lamb meat from her father who lives in the countryside.

Even my parents who arent aware of the future bond market, currency and oil production troubles constantly tell me that if things get too hot out here in southern california, we could always go back to the "country". Not only my parents, but many of my greek-american friends say the exact same thing as many of them still have property, homes and farmland left over from their grandparents. Interestingly enough, they refuse to sell any lots. However, there is plenty of good farm land that sits unused as the current owners are in athens or other major urban areas working in services that would sell the land for a couple grand. Go figure.

dps's picture
dps
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Posts: 442
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

It's perfect.  I'd love to live there.

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Doug
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Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3159
Re: Photos from my village in western Greece

I had the good fortune to visit Athens back in the early 70s.  It stands out in my mind, with Italy, as the places I would most like to settle should I leave the US.  There's a reason the Mediterranean was the cradle of civilization.  It is very conducive to life on a human scale.  Good luck, I'm envious.

Keep in touch, there may still come a time when I want to move.Cool

Doug

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