Permaculture on the BBC

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Walden3's picture
Walden3
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 9 2009
Posts: 21
Permaculture on the BBC

 

The BBC series ‘Natural
world’ recently produced a great TV documentary about what will happen to
farming as oil dries up. Most people here will be familiar with the arguments,
but its well done and went out to millions of Britons last week so the debate
is being had. You can watch it on BBC iplayer online for the next 4-5 days
before its taken down.

 

The basic
argument is that farming practices that fight against nature are energy
intensive and only possible with a surfeit of oil. Once this goes we’ll have to
find new ways to farm that are more sustainable and in step with nature.

 

Permaculture gets
discussed amongst other things. There’s great point when the interviewer asks
whether permaculture can feed
Britain and the interviewee turns it around and
asks if our current methods will be able to continue to do the job. Mike/DTM
will love it!

 

There’s also a
good discussion about soil and what we’ve done to it. Basically turned it into
a dead matter for holding roots, really shocking.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00hs8zp/Natural_World_20082009_A_Farm_for_the_Future/

 

Freddy

affert's picture
affert
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 22 2008
Posts: 100
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

"Currently BBC iPlayer TV programmes are available to play in the UK only, but the BBC iPlayer Radio programmes are availabe to you"

Do you know any way for us Yankees to watch the program? 

Walden3's picture
Walden3
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 9 2009
Posts: 21
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

Sorry Affert, I've had a look and I don't think its possible. I guess this is how the BBC controls access to its output. I'm sorry I had not realised at the time it would be restricted in this way. Mabe search for 'Natural World' and see if its due to be shown overseas.

All the best

Freddy

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

I can't watch it here in AUS either....  I wonder why they do stuff like that?  Recently, something else came up that could only be watched in the US...

Of course I already knew that soils farmed under totalitarian methods had all been killed off.  What IS surprising is how few people realise this, even Permaculture practitioners I have now discovered.

With shortages of fossil fuels, more and more people will have to return to the land, simple as that. 

When I was a kid in the French Alps, I clearly remember the farmers there heaping great piles of steaming manure with pitch forks used to fertilise their land.  Some had tractors, but many still used horse drawn transport, and that was a mere 50 years ago...

Soils will have to be revived using organic/permaculture methods, but it will take some time, and hardships will occur in the meantime.  In Cuba, it is said that during their difficult period post USSR collapse most cubans lost 30 pounds.  I guess most Americans and Australians could afford to lose a whole lot more than that !

 Mike

Vanityfox451's picture
Vanityfox451
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 28 2008
Posts: 1636
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

Hi Freddy,

Did I tell you I emigrated to central Europe? Well, when I arrived here, I had in mind that I'd still keep up with current BBC programs by hitting the iplayer online and...they only offer it to those with a UK IP address. I think there is a way around it by running your internet provider through a UK link but that may well be hyperbole; I'm not clued up enough with computers!!

It would be sacrilidge for the BBC to put adverts into there programming to pay the bill for license payers in one sense (just another bloody stelth tax!?!) but it may have been the difference between watching this link or not...

On another note, I put forward a few ideas for you on my cynicus economicus thread we met on where you mentioned '451'?

Take Care,

Paul

Walden3's picture
Walden3
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 9 2009
Posts: 21
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

Hi Paul

I think I had seen you had emigrated to in a post I read a while back. Hungary wasn't it? How are you finding it? The only things I know about Hungary (and I'm probably incorrect) is that the language is similar to Finnish and that Puskas was a great, great player (that bit I know is true). Anyway I've often thought the BBC should sell its back catelogue in some way - its a goldmine and must be worth a fortune. But they don't so I sure there are good commercial reasons to keep it all locked in the vaults.

I am going to get back to you re your ideas on the '451' thread, just wanted to give it some thought. I read the Orlov essay ckesser posted and thought it was one of the best descriptions of the sorts of things that could and will have to happen as oil becomes scarce. 

Mike - they spent quite a large portion of the programme talking about soil and how ploughing kills it. Obvious to many permaculturalist (though not all you say) but not I'm afraid to most of us. I'm quite ecologically aware and I had no idea how damaging it is. In the programme they provided lots of examples, but the best I thought were pictures of ploughing today vs in the early 80s. Then there were birds following the tractors eating what was turned over, today not a single starling. All the life was gone.The other interesting bit was to think how much food can be harveted per acre and they reckoned up to twice as much as from a cereal crop. Mainly because you can use trees and grow 'vertically' as well as horizontally. 

Best

Freddy

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Hempward
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 28 2009
Posts: 7
Re: Permaculture on the BBC

Greetings all,

 

First post here. I'll make it quick.

In the last week or so I've started devouring info on permaculture. There are over 15 gigs available as torrent downloads. The list of web sites and streaming videos is abundant. The BBC has a slew of shows available as torrents, but not this one. It's just a matter of time though.

I highly recommend looking up Sepp Holzer. There is a handful of documentaries on him and his life's work. Brilliant.

Bruce

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