Palladium -

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KKPSTEIN's picture
KKPSTEIN
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 20 2008
Posts: 120
Palladium -

Hi Everyone.

I'd like to find out more about palladium.  Does anyone here have it in their metals portfolio.  In 2000 the spot price spiked to approx 1075, it is now down to 186.

What is it used for?  Why the big demand back in 2000?  Does it have a bullish future?

Thanks!

Kirsty

 

gyrogearloose's picture
gyrogearloose
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 8 2008
Posts: 549
Re: Palladium -

Check out "cold fusion" not sure from memory, but the timing might be right.

I remember that when the claims of cold fusion were made plladium price spiked BIG.

britinbe's picture
britinbe
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Joined: Dec 28 2008
Posts: 381
Re: Palladium -

Palladium is a very important transition metal that is used as a catalyst in many industrial processes.  It is very important in hydrogenation processes (adding hydrogen to molecules), for example, it is used in the pharmaceutical industry and the food processing industry.

Arthur Vibert's picture
Arthur Vibert
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: May 16 2008
Posts: 116
KKPSTEIN's picture
KKPSTEIN
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 20 2008
Posts: 120
Re: Palladium -
gyrogearloose wrote:

Check out "cold fusion" not sure from memory, but the timing might be right.

I remember that when the claims of cold fusion were made plladium price spiked BIG.

Interesting.  I'll check it out....   Seems like a worthwhile investment.   Thanks everyone. 

 

Arthur Vibert's picture
Arthur Vibert
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Joined: May 16 2008
Posts: 116
Re: Palladium -

I would be extremely cautious about purchasing palladium based on anything to do with cold fusion. 

This is fringe science. Even if it proved to be true that one could create a sustainable fusion reaction at room tempreature there is no evidence that it could be scaled up to be an effective power source.

Palladium is an important element for other reasons, but I would research cold fusion very thoroughly before putting money into anything associated with it.

Arthur

RubberRims's picture
RubberRims
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Joined: Nov 22 2008
Posts: 145
Re: Palladium -

As I understand, careful experiments have been carried out to search for the expected products of cold fusion. The measured products are many orders of magnitude lower than what would be expected from the heat production reported in electrolysis. In many experiments if not all, "no products have ever been detected".

Cold fusion became a plusible expectation, over exaggerated. Hence once the media got a hold of the story in 1998 it became plausible, so people speculated in the hope Cold Fusion could one day become reality.

Something I found interesting. After 40 years of experimentation, Japan was often cited by cold-fusion believers as evidence that the US would one day be left in the dust when the new world energy order finally dawned. Strange thing was in 1997 Japan's government finally gave up on the idea. A subsidiary of the Toyota car manufactuer created IMRA a specialist laboratory. Then in 1998 IMRA was closed, having spent £12m on cold-fusion work.

Today, cold fusion has been almost written off by the scientific community.

alwayssaturday's picture
alwayssaturday
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 12 2008
Posts: 18
Re: Palladium -

You might want to read this article, it references paladium. 

http://stockology.blogspot.com/2008_09_01_archive.html

 

KKPSTEIN's picture
KKPSTEIN
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 20 2008
Posts: 120
Re: Palladium -

Thanks everyone.   I love this forum and appreciate the quality individual input and opinions when I ask a question.

Best regards,
Kirsty

 

DrKrbyLuv's picture
DrKrbyLuv
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 1995
Re: Palladium -

KKPSTEIN - thanks for the great question - I have been wondering too.

Arthur Vibert wrote:

I would be extremely cautious about purchasing palladium based on anything to do with cold fusion. 

This is fringe science. Even if it proved to be true that one could
create a sustainable fusion reaction at room tempreature there is no
evidence that it could be scaled up to be an effective power source.

Palladium is an important element for other reasons, but I would
research cold fusion very thoroughly before putting money into anything
associated with it.

Arthur - I really appreciate your comments and will take heed.

 

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