One last dance before the ship goes down?

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Swampmama3's picture
Swampmama3
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One last dance before the ship goes down?

Maybe I'm a crazy conspiracy theorist, maybe I'm not.  Since I find myself with such a gloomy attitude, I am doing counter intuitive things.  For about two years, I have been conserving resources as much as possible, always driving the vehicle that gets the better mpg when I can, recycling, educating my kids about prepping and opsec, agonizing over the best use of available monies, learning everything I can, shopping for and buying and developing a BOL, etc...   It's been a wild, almost frantic two years since I've been aware of all this.

Lately, I've gotten a bit bummed because I look around, and for every bag of garbage I keep out of the landfill, my shopaholic neighbors put one more at the curb.  For every time I wait til next time to flush the toilet, I see somebody running a sprinkler when its not needed.  I could make a long list, but you get the idea.  So, I'm still gonna do the stewardship things that bring me satisfaction, and I'm sure as heck gonna rush my preps toward completion as I can, BUT...

I am taking the kids to Disney and blowing $5k doing it up right.  I'm buying all the music I want for my ipod.  I'm keeping a good stock in my liquor collection and enjoying a (single) drink almost every night.  Amongst all the news and educational reading I do, I am starting to read a good ole trashy romance a few times a month.  And next year, if the world is still spinning and I'm still breathing air, I hope to blow another few thousand taking the family to Colorado to see the Rockies, maybe even Yellowstone.

I feel a bit of guilt doing these things, especially since I know the thousands I spend on vacation could build me the shelter I want at my BOL.  But I'm tired of the doom all the time.  I figure if there's little time left, I want my kids to have good memories of good times.  I want memories of good times too.  I realize I don't remember the little good times, like getting a snowcone for everybody on a hot afternoon.  The big, impressive things do stick in my mind.  They're easy to recall.  If we're stuck in our BOL for the rest of our lives someday because there is no infrastructure, no fuel, no better place to go, I want stories to tell my grandkids.

Is anybody else prehaps doing things they wouldn't normally do at this time, just because you may never get to do them again?  Going somewhere or visiting a faraway friend or splurging on sky-diving, or something you always wanted to do? Kinda like a bucket list?

deggleton's picture
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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

You seem to be saying good times = carefree consumption (within one's means, of course).

Creating community is challenging for us for sure, but it will be a tremendous source of stories about a time of upheaval and collaborative design of new normals.  A source of healthy pride, as well.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

I've been thinking about taking the kids to Europe. I'm pretty sure that's going to be out of reach for us in a few more years, regardless of how the decline unfolds. But I'm  hoping I can wait another year or two, as the youngest is 8 1/2 and I'd rather he be older to cement the memories better. Beyond that, we're pretty happy here in our own corner of the world. I do think it's important to stop, breathe deeply and realize that in this moment, I have everything I need, the sun is shining, and all is frankly wonderful. "The future is a story we use to terrify ourselves" is a quote I love. And I'm still prepping, as I am moved to.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

I am with you Swampmama3! First it was the "essentials" - dh especially was thrilled that I wasn't questioning every tool purchase and when we had to replace our broken fridge, we purchased an additional one for the garage ... and followed that with a generator. I find myself encouraging the teens to buy additional pairs of jeans or shoes when they go out (those of you with girls might not have to do as much encouraging.)

But then it gets to non-essentials and yes, it seems a little ludicrous to be careful with every purchase when costs are only likely to go up, some stuff may not be as readily available and in a world rendered much "slower," creature comforts may be what helps you through the rough times. Hysterically even my dad excused an additional computer purchase with "well, Shireen thinks money won't be worth anything soon."

A trip has also been on our agenda ... for the same reasons you mentioned ... the memories and experience for kids who may not have as much of a chance as we've had to enjoy frequent and easy travel. And yes, though we are still likely far more conservative in spending than most folks, the thought that there may not be too many more of these left makes it harder to not go all out when we do go.

deggleton, I hear what you are saying and agree about the pride and strength that will come from creating a new reality ... in a way I'm hopeful that our children's lives will ultimately be filled with more meaning as a result of the coming challenges. Nonetheless, they will be the ones hit hardest by the coming struggles ... ones which they had no part in creating ... and it couldn't hurt to fill up their emotional bank accounts with good times and warm memories when we can.

I don't see it as good times = carefree consumption as much as acknowledging that with so much unknown before us, it is hard to always be completely practical, especially when those of us who have, are getting the short end of the economic stick. 

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Saffron wrote:

 Nonetheless, they will be the ones hit hardest by the coming struggles ... ones which they had no part in creating ... and it couldn't hurt to fill up their emotional bank accounts with good times and warm memories when we can.

I don't see it as good times = carefree consumption as much as acknowledging that with so much unknown before us, it is hard to always be completely practical, especially when those of us who have, are getting the short end of the economic stick. 

+1

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

We only live once & who knows what money will by in the future. Great memories & fun with the kids you cannot go back & redo. Enjoy life while we can along with preparing the best we can with what we have. I still get bummed out with all this Collapse crap & shtf....even though I know that is one reality that may happen. What does Collapse really mean any way, most of us will go on living like always....with some inconveniences & new appreciation of how it use to be.

I do look at my spending different changing hobbies for things that will have more value if things do fall apart.

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Swampmama3
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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

In an odd way, I see our children as hardest hit because they have had their lives so far, their critical formative years, with one foot in the easy energy world where nearly anything is possible.  It is likely that their adult lives will be far less easy, and the times we live in now will be the stuff of bedtime stories for their kids.  Their children, on the other foot, will probably know nothing but what we tell them of the easy world we live in now.  They will not feel the privation because they won't have experienced air conditioning or ice cream or a trip to Europe or disney to miss it.  They will only get to look at the photo album, like a story book.  They will hear descriptions of attending a concert, riding on a train, or snorkeling with dolphins in Florida.

I want my kids and grandkids to have an awareness of a broader world and peoples.  I want them to know about the folly of humanity that lead us to where we will end up and how we lost it all.  But I also want to put images in their minds of the wonderful things humanity achieved, the richness of culture and human experience.  Music, art, mind boggling things like getting to the moon and taking up close pictures of that little red speck up there that's really the planet Mars and even putting little robots on it that are to this day sitting there waiting for further instructions.

I bought a huge coffee table book that shows wonderful satellite images of the entire planet's surface.  I'm going to buy another huge book that's all about world peoples and their dress and culture.  I alread have history, science, art and biology texts.  There's math somewhere, but ugh.  Hate math.  That'll be my husband's job. 

I have found there is a stagnant air about some isolated country communities.  They're well frogs.  They can't even imagine an ocean and wouldn't want to go there even if they could.  I want my descendants to wonder and dream and invent and strive, being aware of the history behind them to not repeat mistakes.  To dream and strive, I think one has to have stories and inspiration and be aware of the possibilities. 

 I'm talking about life experience.  You know, the things you wish you could be doing when you are grinding away at work Monday through Friday, waiting for the weekend?  Some of those things are blissfully simple, and we do a lot of that.  But for some things, you do have to spend some money to make them happen.  So be it. 

Sometimes this being aware of the situation we're in and prepping sensibly for what may happen feels like a religion.  It has guidelines and boundaries of things that are considered wise, and things that are considered foolish.  Being intensively immersed in this mindset for a few years has made me feel like going on a vacation or spending money for fun is a big bad sin of some sort.  Then I look at the flip side of that.  When you live under self imposed austerity, your outlook can get depressing.  Life is strict and no fun if the first thing you think in any situation is "how does this fit in with our plans for the future?  Should we spend the money on something else?"  I find I have stopped living in the present in some ways.  Everything I do is for the future.

My kids are children only for right now.  They never will be again.  This is the brief time I have with them.  I will make memories while I can, and prep too.  Being Eeyore all the time about everything brings the whole household down.

 

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

 Good points Swampmamma,  

    I say I am not there YET . This does not mean I judge you or that I won't join you tomorrow . BUT..  I feel If I am going around tooting the horn of  peek oil , overpopulation , T EOTWAWKI  and I spend the oil and that  kind of money on plane tickets ,or anything else for that matter , MY Children , family , friends , and neighbors will hop on me as a hypocrite in a moment .

  I also know for a fact my children can have as much fun and  make  memories  floating down the river in$8 or used  inner-tubes ( plus learning survival skills ) as they did in our $10,000 boat and $100 days at the lake that  used up much oil  .    

  This said , I am also not in a comfortable   position  to support them if they loose their jobs and come knocking on my door with hungry babies  and they are resistant to learn the skills to survive  what lies ahead  because of what our generation has done to the world .  

  This site   following truly does feel like a religion / cult at times,  one with not many  answers and no hope   VS.  our sins were paid for and  we live in freedom and hope.   Each one of us are only promised this moment on this earth .......if tomorrow never comes....   ENJOY  your children   your parents,  your friends ,  today and everyday   .   It is the relationships that count not the amount of money you spend on the fun times .  Today is a gift  as are  the people in our lives .  Count your blessings.

FM     

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V
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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

Some dance to remember, some dance to forget.................just don't forget to remember to dance

V

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Swampmama3
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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

LaughingV  Yup, I find myself forgetting to dance here lately.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

I forgot about the ship when responding to the initial post.  I've wanted to get off of it for so long that it's hard to relate to the nostalgia-in-advance that many of you share.

What's been characterized as a good time is also a weird and privileged time (from a historical and global perspective).  It's as much about what energy slaves make possible as about human ingenuity.  The latter may have more varied opportunities, post-collapse.

Enjoy the fun and memories you enjoy, now and always.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

From my perspective, (being older than dirt) you have some things mixed up,.  You have to spend a lot of money to give your children good memories?  Nonsence.  Do your children play sports?  How many times have you been to their games?  Ever take your children fishing?  Ever take your children hunting?  What activities do you have that involve all of your family?  Ever take your children to the park for a picnic lunch?  Push them on the park swing until your arms give out?  Do you go to the YMCA with your children?  

IMO, you are just looking for a way to get away from the stress of life and think you have to go to Europe or Disney World to accomplish this.  Time spent with your children will give them the memories you are talking about.  Go to Dairy Queen and buy a couple of bags of frozen Dilly Bars and get chocolate all over your tee shirt with the kids.  Laugh a lot and have fun with them. 

 

And don't forget to dance with your wife.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

We are going into the season for Wedding dances !     Even in hard times people still get married .

   I was remembering  that early in our marriage ,in the late seventy's , we would travel clear across the USA  with $200 to our name, if we ran  out of money we would sleep in the car .   We traveled Europe  with cheese , apples ,and a jug of water  . Thought we needed to take in every castle and historical site . Now after 6-8 hours in the car I am asking for a motel with a spa .Frown  I do not know if we were just young and dumb  but boy we had not a worry in the world !  Now I do not go into town without that $200 plus spend much more while there ,and still have  the weight of the world ( that we can not fix ) on our shoulders .     Why ? Because we are to focused on ourselves .   If I take the kids in to work at the food pantry  or  serve at a inner-city kids camp  it takes our eyes off our worries . It gives us a purpose that is not self centered  .   We are not on the earth to serve ourselves .  Of course we will always have a battle with selfishness but  if we   Open our arms  the blessings pour in  and we find we really have very little needs .  The more you give the more you get back ... kids and people just want your time and to be with you .  

   I am not saying you should not take the trip  what I am saying is the trip  will not make you happy .  And might even make it worse . If you look forward to something so much and spend  much money on the trip it puts so much pressure on it and the fun goes right  out the window.

 If the kids are accustomed to  such luxuries  it might be you need to wean them  off to more simple things slowly  and do expect temper tantrums and rebellion .   Many may find this to be so with a non understanding  spouse as well .

 It is good that you speak up and ask   the question here so that you do not go on and on in your mind about what you have to give up and focus on your fears and frustrations.  Especially if you do not have a community  built close to you .     It could be anyone of us that goes through the frustration tomorrow or  next week and needs to sound off .

 Hope you get a little peace knowing others are in the same boat .

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Swampmama3
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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Golden Age wrote:

From my perspective, (being older than dirt) you have some things mixed up,.  You have to spend a lot of money to give your children good memories?  Nonsence.  Do your children play sports?  How many times have you been to their games?  Ever take your children fishing?  Ever take your children hunting?  What activities do you have that involve all of your family?  Ever take your children to the park for a picnic lunch?  Push them on the park swing until your arms give out?  Do you go to the YMCA with your children?  

IMO, you are just looking for a way to get away from the stress of life and think you have to go to Europe or Disney World to accomplish this.  Time spent with your children will give them the memories you are talking about.  Go to Dairy Queen and buy a couple of bags of frozen Dilly Bars and get chocolate all over your tee shirt with the kids.  Laugh a lot and have fun with them. 

 

And don't forget to dance with your wife.

Wow, y'all are making a lot of assumptions!  I can't expect you to know me from a very limited web forum.  Let me clear the air a bit.  We do all the simple, free activities you mention all the time.  We live near lots of forest and other wilderness and make use of it all the time hiking, camping, star gazing, and in cub scout activities.  My kids are not in 'sports' but are in shorin ryu karate and we are all very involved in that.  I never miss a class with them, or a test or a sparring event.  My hubby is the assistant cubmaster for our pack and I was den leader for 2 years and am still involved heavily in that.  We have chickens, gardens, and a rural property where they are building tree houses and hay forts just playing in general.  I'm an at home mom and they have never been in day care, ever.  I also spend most of my days caring for my elderly mother who has alzheimer's.  We are together all the time, getting dirt on our hands, sweating, laughing and having fun.  We do not watch TV or play video games.  We are very happy and feel blessed to have such a wonderful life in spite of the condition of the world today.  BUT, I do not hide my concerns about the future from my kids.  They could, and sometimes do, try to educate their peers and teachers about globalization, advancing socialism, emminent food crisis and inflation, peak oil, etc.  We in this house, know what's coming, and it weighs upon us heavily.  That, combined with the constant care of my mother, and managing two households, is grinding me down.  I need a break away from it all.  I want to go somewhere far away that will not remind me of my worries.

Everything I do is planned and budgeted, far into the future. The vacation is already paid in full, cash money, no debt, no worries, down to the last meal and the last gallon of gasoline needed for the journey.  No, we're not flying.  I checked.  That's insanely expensive.  We'll be taking our little honda and listening to fights in the back seat all the way, I imagine.  (mom, he's touching me!  Am not!  He's looking out my window, he stole my french fry.....etc.)

 We are already very happy and have a whole lotta love and togetherness.  We are not depending on the vacation to make us spend time together or be happy.  We are depending on the vacation to get away from my duties as caregiver (I've hired a sitter for mom), and to go make memories that are spactacular (sp?) because they are so out of the ordinary.  We've done all the camping, hiking, rock climbing, free stuff available around here ad nauseum, remember?  We want something different, something rare and wonderful.  While we still can.

My point with this thread was not to explain or justify that we are going to Disney.  That was given as an example of an action that is entirely out of the ordinary for us, because we are prepping for when TSHTF.  I was asking if anybody else is feeling the urge to do crazy, last-chance things they wouldn't ordinarily do, just because we see things getting so bad and we may not have the chance again.  Point being, I would not be going to disney at all this year if I thought we had plentiful time in the future to do it.  I would have gone on our usual shoestring-budget camping trip, or gotten a cabin for a few days at a local park, maybe seen a museum or two.

So, all that being cleared up hopefully, is anyone else doing anything out of character just because they've always wanted to, but never have, or think you just might not get the chance to ever again?  The going to Europe idea is great, but I just don't have that kind of $$ lying around anytime soon.  If we're lucky and a miracle happens and the future is just rosy, we'll probably get around to doing that in about 10 years or so.  I also want to get all of us certified as scuba divers like my dad did with me, and go show them all the cool stuff underwater.  But that's something we probably don't have time for.  My only near source of dive sites is covered in crude oil right now anyway. Yell

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My "one last dance"

On the subject of "do what you can/want to now because in the future it might not be possible" --

I have many simple pleasures that may go away in the event of an oil/econ crash.  But one that sums up all 3Es in a nice little package is:  sushi dinner.

My wife is crazy for sushi.  I enjoy it.  Whenever we go, it's generally her idea (or I'll suggest it because I know she loves it).  But being inland and all, sushi is not exactly "eating local".  Whenever we're at our local sushi place, at some point during the meal I'll look at what we're eating and a little voice in my head says "enjoy, buckaroo...this is all going away pretty soon."

Okay, the voice probably doesn't say "buckaroo" but you get my point.  Smile

Viva -- Sager

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Re: My "one last dance"

Now dats what I'm talkin about!

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Swampmama3 wrote:

We want something different, something rare and wonderful.  While we still can.

I totally understand and I see nothing wrong with it.

In light of "what we know," I have found myself (oddly) wanting to be a bit less miserly about some spending than I otherwise would have been.  There is little point in saving pennies for a rainy day, because when the rainy day comes, those pennies won't be worth anything anyway.  But today they are worth something.  I am not buying the  cheapest incarnation of the things we need; I'm buying things with sturdiness and durability and longevity and, yes, aesthetics in mind.  I am spending my money locally to help keep my local economy vital, and if this means buying a beautiful but not strictly essential item from a local craftsperson, I am happy to do it.

We all have to weigh what is most important to us personally, and this will vary from person to person.  I would not find value in a trip to Disney, but I am indulging in some music camps and workshops for my family this summer, in part because I assume it might not be possible any other year and this year we actually can swing it.  Yes, we could pinch every cent and buy another durable item or two or six, or an ounce or two of gold, or put it toward an eventual downpayment on land.  But the joy, the skills, the community connections, and the personal growth we will experience this summer are also lasting and important investments.  And I think it is important to do things to keep our morale high while we are working so hard toward preparing for the future.

Sure, we can do plenty of learning and doing and seeing at home (and we do - we homeschool and we are quite minimal in our outside activities.  But the personal growth my kids will experience through outside experiences will help them grow into sound and confident adults, and that has important value.

I think the key is to be openly mindful...if I took my kids to Disney, we would be debriefing what Disney means in our greater culture, why it won't last, and why our family felt it important to go there "one last time."

You do not have to defend your choices. 

And yes, we eat sushi once in awhile, and when we do, I am mindful that it could be the last time, and I try hard to savor the experience and the memory.  I think this helps me enjoy it more, not less. 

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Swampmama3 wrote:

We want something different, something rare and wonderful.  While we still can.

I totally understand and I see nothing wrong with it.

In light of "what we know," I have found myself (oddly) wanting to be a bit less miserly about some spending than I otherwise would have been.  There is little point in saving pennies for a rainy day, because when the rainy day comes, those pennies won't be worth anything anyway.  But today they are worth something.  I am not buying the cheapest incarnation of the things we need; I'm buying things with sturdiness and durability and longevity and, yes, aesthetics in mind.  I am spending my money locally to help keep my local economy vital, and if this means buying a beautiful but not strictly essential item from a local craftsperson, I am happy to do it.  I want an experience-rich past and a beautiful and comfortable future.  Even if it costs more now than I would have spent if I were continuing to live the standard American disposable lifestyle.  There will be more than enough time for strict austerity.

We all have to weigh what is most important to us personally, and this will vary from person to person.  I would not find value in a trip to Disney, but I am indulging in some music camps and workshops for my family this summer, in part because I assume it might not be possible any other year and this year we actually can swing it.  Yes, we could pinch every cent and buy another durable item or two or six, or a small amount of gold or silver, or put it toward an eventual downpayment on land.  But the joy, the skills, the community connections, and the personal growth we will experience this summer are also lasting and valid investments.  And I think it is important to do things to keep our morale high while we are working so hard toward preparing for the future.

Sure, we can do plenty of learning and doing and seeing at home (and we do - we homeschool and we are quite minimal in our outside activities.)  But the personal growth my kids will experience through outside experiences will help them grow into sound and confident adults, and that has important value.

I think the key is to be openly mindful...if I took my kids to Disney, we would be debriefing what Disney means in our greater culture, why it won't last, and why our family felt it important to go there "one last time." 

You do not have to defend your choices. 

And yes, we eat sushi once in awhile, and when we do, I am mindful that it could be the last time, and I try hard to savor the experience and the memory.  I think this helps me enjoy it more, not less. 

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Full Moon wrote:

We are going into the season for Wedding dances !     Even in hard times people still get married.

My wife & I are actually going to a wedding this weekend.  We leave later today and it'll be a nice 2-day getaway (it's in a very rural locale, no cell/internet) and a chance to unplug.  And a chance to just celebrate and be alive and forget that the world out there is potentially melting down as we speak...Surprised

As for dancing -- I'm deejaying 1/2 the reception and the after-party.  So there will *definitely* be some booty shaking!  UNH!

Viva -- Sager

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

Sager ,

  Do you have " Have you really ever loved a Woman,  by Brian Adams ?  "  A must have for a wedding dance  in the country !     Get out and join the crowd for the chicken dance and cotton eyed Joe... surely is  one job you love  !    My son-in-law that is a bullfighter is the biggest hoot at these things .... LOVES life !  Ok so I confess we have barn dances  a few times a year   ... the only expense is to pay the DJ or musicians  and it is an excuse to stop work and get together with the friends and neighbors .

 Swampmama ,    Our biggest splurge is musical instruments and lessons .  Quite often I have doubts on the money spent there  but Music is something we get to take through eternity .

  Take the family to Disney Land if that is your dream .

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Full Moon wrote:

Sager ,

  Do you have " Have you really ever loved a Woman,  by Brian Adams ?  "  A must have for a wedding dance  in the country !     

The bride didn't request that song, but I've slow-danced to it at weddings.  It's a friend's wedding and I just had her and her fiancee sit down w/me and we chose songs.  Whatever I didn't already have, I downloaded.  It's a pretty eclectic list -- from Tom Jones to Stevie Wonder to Earth Wind & Fire to Lady Gaga to Cucu Diamantes (Cuban-American woman from Miami [or "Myjammy" as she'd say]).  Gonna be a kick!

 

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

oohh, musical instruments!  That's great.  The hubby has 2 guitars, and I have wondered how many sets of strings we should get.  Lessons are a good idea, though I don't think our family schedule will handle one more thing at the moment.

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Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
Amanda wrote:

 I am spending my money locally to help keep my local economy vital, and if this means buying a beautiful but not strictly essential item from a local craftsperson, I am happy to do it.

+1 ... I've done the same thing! 

Another thing we are doing is hiring friends who are out of work to do things we could (eventually) do ourselves - painting the outside of the house or helping to build a wall.

The most wonderful story I ever read about the depression was about an old farmer and his wife who were completely self-sufficient on their farm. One day a man came by asking for work in return for a meal. The farmer pointed to a stack of wood on the porch and said he'd been meaning to get it stacked up behind the house. The man gladly did the hard work, gratefully sat down to a hearty meal and was on his way the next day. Awhile later another man showed up asking the same thing. The farmer pointed to the stack of wood behind the house and said he'd been meaning to get it stacked up on the porch.

That stack of wood went from the porch to the behind the house and back scores of time all summer. Each time somebody was able to keep his pride because he had earned himself a meal.  

My dream is to have that kind of farm ... though first we'll have to find the property :)

osb272646's picture
osb272646
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 14 2010
Posts: 120
Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

I give up.  What's a BOL?

land2341's picture
land2341
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 20 2009
Posts: 402
Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?
osb272646 wrote:

I give up.  What's a BOL?

 

Bug Out Location   Some people have a fairly remote,  self sufficient place to get away from the chaos,  to be safe and independent..  My BOl is my house.  We bought land out a ways,  but not too far and have spent 5 years working on community.  It means different things to different people.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

*laughs* My husband and I are too frugal to blow monies on fluff on the best of days. Our idea of an expensive date its to go get a couple of "value menu" ice cream sundaes at $1 a pop (yeah, that will stop but until then it's fun). Cheap dates are a game of UNO and playing with our mouser cat and a string. Except for prepping, I'm not doing anything differently except to enjoy my life as I always do.  I live my life fully in the day anyhow. 

There is an old Buddist story about the monk who fell off a clilff. He caught hold of a branch. If his strength failed, a tiger was beneath him, waiting to eat him. What did he do? He contemplated the blossoms on the branch, enjoyed the wind and the mountain air, and was fully centered. If he could not change things, he could at least be calm.

That's where I want to be.

Bluenoser's picture
Bluenoser
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 11 2010
Posts: 28
Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

Swampmama, our family went to Disney World last year (before becoming aware of the three E's) and while we could have spent the money in a hundred more 'sensible' ways, I'm very glad we went while we still had the opportunity to go.  We sqeezed every drop of magic out of the experience, and have a lot of memories to add to the family togetherness vault; for us this vault is already brimming with fishing excursions, reading favorite stories, making Christmas wreaths and garlands, or just having a game of Crazy 8's.  But Disney is in there too, and I'm glad it is. 

One thing I wanted to ask you about, though.  You mention in your post that you're collecting schoolbooks for your children.  I was thinking about this the other day, and trying to decide if I think the education system will collapse.  If it does, I wonder what will replace it.  I don't want to believe that 400 years of public education will go down the tubes, and I think that there are alternatives even if the state or province can't operate the status quo any longer.  My mom went to elementary school in a one room schoolhouse that, according to the Province of Nova Scotia, did not exist.  It was run by the community, so the provincial Department of Education does not have any school records on file.  The community built a schoolhouse on donated land.  The teacher was "boarded" by different families in the village (one month in this household, one month in that household), and paid a salary besides.  Even though it did not officially exist as a school, it prepared the children well for high school, and for life.  If we lose the public education system, I hope that small scale local options will replace it. 

My husband and I place a very high value on learning, and while I would be the first to say that I try not to let school get in the way of my children's education, I believe that school has many merits despite the issues within the system.  I would not be saddened to see our education system change, but I would not want to see it fail.  Do you think this is inevitable, at any level?  Are there other options?  My husband is a stay at home dad, but he is a high school social studies teacher by profession; if the system collapsed, couldn't the teachers themselves work together to offer classes to small groups of students?  Not the 1000 plus mega schools that have become the norm, but something between a one room school house and a 19th century Irish hedgerow school? 

I'd welcome your thoughts on this. 

Bluenoser

 

Romans12.2's picture
Romans12.2
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 14 2009
Posts: 227
Re: One last dance before the ship goes down?

Just read this thread and wish I read it earlier! 

Last week sitting at our favorite restaurant, (Sushi every Wednesday).  I was talking about the future as usual and asking my husband "What will our kids future be?". 

My 14 year old son said something that made me so sad.  He said he just hoped that Jesus came soon and then he would not have to worry about what the future holds...

I was speechless.  I'm a Christian, and yet feel we have alot of struggle and chaos to come before the end times.

My poor kids have listened to me talk about starving people and collapse and prepping for two years.  I'm feeling a little guilty.  I don't want my son to long for heaven when he has his whole life ahead of him!

We are blessed right now with knowledge of whats to come and alot of income.  We prep and store and also eat out and take lots of vacations.  I figure, I want one last dance before the ship goes down.  And I know my kids future will be hard, I love that they can have memories of technology, roller coasters and sushi.

We come home from dinner and weed our garden together.  Life is good.

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