An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

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MCFLYFYTER's picture
MCFLYFYTER
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An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

I have read many opinions on a future gold confiscation.  I have yet to see anyone mention the fact that gold WAS money when it was confiscated.  Once the government had possession of all they could get, gold went from $20 to $35. They were not going to make gold in our posetion worth more. This is the only reason it was confiscated.

Pablo_Eagle's picture
Pablo_Eagle
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Since you seem ignorant toward the US government, I suggest you read the following:

Undermining The Constitution

A HISTORY OF LAWLESS GOVERNMENT

By Thomas James Norton

http://www.barefootsworld.net/nortonuc.html

Mike Pilat's picture
Mike Pilat
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Just read The US Constitution, Article 1, Section 10.

Pablo_Eagle's picture
Pablo_Eagle
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Stated article is about the coining of money to be in gold and silver only.

The fourth amendment states the right of the People to be secure In their Persons, Houses, Papers, and Effects, against unreasonable Searches and Seizures. Seizing firearms after Katrina, or threatening to seize gold if not handed over, is unlawful. Clearly both and many others have been violated. Creating, maintaining and executing unlawful laws, makes for an unlawful government. If you start excepting one, you should except them all, and everything which follows in their wake. The article I mention is about the history of such acts. The site has a beautiful part 1/3 way down of education for the common man on the constitution, with every article investigated, called: The Constitution for the United States.

A couple of articles down is the article: Undermining the constitution. Its preface quoted here:

Preface

The writing of this book was impelled (or compelled) by the very manifest indifference of the people of the United States to the constitutional doctrines of their country. This had been developing so rapidly that all ideas of constitutionalism seemed to have passed out of the American mind. That is, indefensible proposals and practices against the plainest limitations on power set in the Constitution provoked no objections even from the Bar. For two decades no great debate on a constitutional subject had been heard in either House of Congress.

The National Education Association, theoretically representing the teachers of the country, had for years been passing resolutions favoring whatever was before the public of un-American import, especially for getting the imperial Government at Washington, through "Federal aid," to take over the shaping in school of American ideas. Under the cloak of "academic freedom" men in the universities belittled those who wrote the Constitution and pronounced their work faulty and outmoded.

The schools, while neglecting to give thorough courses in our history, and especially in constitutional history or the history of Liberty, admitted objectionable textbooks and periodicals.

Laws enacted by States after the Civil War requiring the teaching of the Constitution in the schools became dead letters. Similar laws of more than forty States enacted after World War I became dead letters too. So the governmental chaos, as it appears to be, came not by chance. The Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch

xi

xii

of Government reported in 1948 that in the President's Department there are 1,800 different administrative units, and that the proposals of the Commission would save the taxpayers "billions — not millions, but billions." Plain lawlessness in taxation and a brutal attitude toward the taxpayer were among the conditions that compelled the writing of this book.

The principles of our Government are not outmoded, as some say. They are as immutable as those of mathematics. The first of them, so well put by Jefferson, is that the man to whom power is given must be chained. The profound historians at Philadelphia who wrote the Constitution looked back over the centuries and drew that principle from the recurring tyrannies and unfailing breakdowns of governments. So, to prevent "the very definition of despotism," as they termed the union of powers in one hand or body, from coming to the New World, they separated the Legislative, the Executive, and the Judicial powers, and then, by the most careful specifications, limited the application of each class.

The States retained sovereignty in local affairs.

During the last three decades nearly every restraint upon the man in power has been broken. Worse than that, lawlessness provokes no reasoning objection.

In the Roman Republic there was an elaborate distribution of powers, but in time all were gathered into one hand. First the Republic and then the Empire fell. A historian tells us that "statesmen came to disregard all checks in the [Roman] Constitution in order to carry a point."

What John Adams praised as the "checks and balances" in our Government also will fail unless respect for them returns.

Pablo_Eagle's picture
Pablo_Eagle
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Sorry: accept not except

wdstk46's picture
wdstk46
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

During the 1920s the U.S. experienced a substantial period of monetary and credit inflation.  Since the dollar was defined as a fixed amount of gold this put a tremendous strain on the gold reserves held by the government and the dollar suffered badly in international markets.  As part of his "Emergency Plan" FDR sought to revalue the dollar.  No revaluation could take place with gold coin in circulation and thus it was all called in.  This was done in 1933.  The value of a dollar was reset at 1/35th of an ounce of gold and was redeemable by foreign banks only.  

Contrary to popular belief, less than 25% of the circulating gold was ever turned in.   The balance was either hidden or shipped to Europe.  The long-term effect of the order was disastrous, as can be seen by what happened to the dollar in the succeeding years.  For the government to continue to try and defend the gold exchange rate, coin could not be allowed to circulate.  After 1971, when the dollar was formally taken off the gold standard there was no need for restricting gold ownership and the order was lifted.

Was any of this constitutional?  I think certainly not.  These days very little is.  

Jim

 

 

 

Pablo_Eagle's picture
Pablo_Eagle
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Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Hey Jim,

It is not unlawful for the government to regulate the value of the dollar. The important question is only: Why does the government need to steal (or seize) peoples gold unlawfully, to regulate the value of the dollar?

What cannot be done, will never happen. As you claim yourself, many people did not let their gold be stolen, and regardless, the dollar was devalued anyway.

Pablo

wdstk46's picture
wdstk46
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Posts: 59
Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

Hi Pablo,

Regulating the gold content of the dollar is certainly constitutional, the problem was that you can't change it without recalling the stamped coins and reissuing new.  The government needed control of the gold to both satisfy foreign claims and to continue to boost the amount of paper cash and credit in circulation.  Greshams law states that bad money will drive out good and you can't have inflated paper money and gold circulating side by side.  Not in a gold standard, anyway.  That was the rational. 

As far as international gold flows were concerned, it worked.  Gold started flowing into the U.S. as Roosevelt had overvalued gold (and undervalued the dollar) by a substantial amount.  With gold out of U.S. circulation, he was also free to inflate as needed.  Overall, it was a great plan.  It was just unconstitutional, in my opinion, and did nothing to alleviate the depression that had bee caused by the collapse of the previous bout of inflation. 

And so it goes...

Jim

MCFLYFYTER's picture
MCFLYFYTER
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Posts: 19
Re: An Often Overlooked Gold Confiscation Fact

I guess my point was that they can't really take your gold, then say its worth $2,000 an ounce. The government only lies, cheats and steals if they benifit from it.  I guess if that makes me ignorant to the government, so be it. 

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