New Spanish airline travel regulations??

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scbissler's picture
scbissler
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 9 2008
Posts: 39
New Spanish airline travel regulations??

This may sound crazy :

Was watching CNBC this morning.  Erin Burnett read a piece on air about new regulations regarding airplanes flying into Spain from abroad that have just gone into effect.  Planes must now turn off their engines 180 km from the airport, coast the remaining distance and then turn the engines back on for final approach/landing.  The reason is to reduce carbon footprint.  Supposedly a scandinavian airline already uses this technique.  I have not found anything online - Does anyone know anything about this??  I'm actually traveling to Spain with my family this spring and not too keen on this idea.

ReginaF's picture
ReginaF
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Joined: Jan 16 2009
Posts: 93
Re: New Spanish airline travel regulations??

More information about the landing procedures of sas please see here

http://www.flysas.com/en/uk/media/Press-center/Scandinavian_Airlines_Sets_World_First_For_Greener_Aviation/?vst=true

Best greetings from Germany

Regina

locklimitdown's picture
locklimitdown
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Joined: Mar 15 2008
Posts: 46
Re: New Spanish airline travel regulations??
scbissler wrote:

This may sound crazy :

Was watching CNBC this morning.  Erin Burnett read a piece on air about new regulations regarding airplanes flying into Spain from abroad that have just gone into effect.  Planes must now turn off their engines 180 km from the airport, coast the remaining distance and then turn the engines back on for final approach/landing.  The reason is to reduce carbon footprint.  Supposedly a scandinavian airline already uses this technique.  I have not found anything online - Does anyone know anything about this??  I'm actually traveling to Spain with my family this spring and not too keen on this idea.

I have been flying for 40 years. Let me assure you no such procedure would be considered much less practiced. Engines are NEVER shutdown in flight unless there is severe internal damage or a fire.

BTW. On a number of occasions, in the past jetliners have lost both engines at altitude and landed successfully under emergency conditions. They do glide well. As a matter of fact, normal decent is made at idle where almost zero thrust is being generated by the engines.

 

Hope that helps!

scbissler's picture
scbissler
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 9 2008
Posts: 39
continuous descent approach

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_descent

I guess this is it.  The entry says that they "idle" the engines - is that different from "turning off"?  Just seems like a crazy thing to do.  Any pilots out there know anything about this "CDA"?

Tim_P's picture
Tim_P
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 23 2009
Posts: 298
Re: New Spanish airline travel regulations??

Idling engines is differerent than turning them off.  It would be like popping your car into neutral as you approach a redlight.  It is done currently during a decent portion of the approach and this sounds like they are optimizing the landings to eliminate having to throttle back up as much as possible.

Tim

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