MF Global losers Gerald Celente and Bill Fleckenstien.

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Johnny Oxygen's picture
Johnny Oxygen
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MF Global losers Gerald Celente and Bill Fleckenstien.

Has anyone else heard about this?

It appears that Gerald Celente and Bill Fleckenstien lost money with MF Global.

What the heck?

I thought these guys were smarter than that. What gives. Anyone have anymore info?

RogerA's picture
RogerA
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Gerald Celente on MF Global - MF'ers 'took my money'

 

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earthwise
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Celente explains

 

Here's Celente's interview with King World News.

http://www.kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast/Entries/2011/11/17_Gerald_Celente.html

It seems that he had a contract to take physical delivery of gold in December. Instead they took his money and he got stiffed.

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land2341
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Let's drop the tone

 We're back to blaming the victim here.

When people break the law we blame the victim instead of recognizing the truth.  Celente was brave and straighforward to come out publicly.  What this tells you is that NO ONE IS SAFE when the pool is SO crooked.  

We really have to move past the caveat emptor idea to such a degree that we blame the victims all of the time.  Hold the crooks accountable.  

Johnny Oxygen's picture
Johnny Oxygen
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land2341 wrote:  We're back
land2341 wrote:

 We're back to blaming the victim here.

When people break the law we blame the victim instead of recognizing the truth.  Celente was brave and straighforward to come out publicly.  What this tells you is that NO ONE IS SAFE when the pool is SO crooked.  

We really have to move past the caveat emptor idea to such a degree that we blame the victims all of the time.  Hold the crooks accountable.  

 

I don't get the impression any of the posters are blaming Gerald or Bill.

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Damnthematrix
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MF Global - A Fractal In A Frying Pan

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/guest-post-mf-global-fractal-frying-pan

MF Global - A Fractal In A Frying Pan


by MsCreant

Gerald Celente, in an interview with Russia Today, claims he cannot access his PM trading account or get answers to his inquiries. It turns out Lind-Waldock, who he originally had the account with, was subsequently bought out by the now bankrupting MF Global. Understandably distraught, Celente asserts, “They took my money out of my account, six figures, and they have it. They closed out two of my positions, and I cannot get any answers, and I can’t get my money.”

Celente got many of us thinking—“If a guy like him can be refused access to his money, then who is safe?” Some argue he should not have been buying “paper gold.” Celente states that he was buying PM futures and taking delivery. “Max Keiser” the “Silver Bears” “Turd Fergusen” and more, have encouraged us to buy silver and “Bust the Comex.” Many of us here on Zero Hedge have fantasized in the comments section about someone wealthy enough to lay a few billion on the Comex for PMs and then stand for delivery. Celente, it is arguable, was doing this not only for himself but perhaps for Joe and Josephine Average who do not have the ammunition to fight this fight.

But as I got to thinking, I realized all of the above misses a valuable take away lesson. It is not simply the case that MF Global is a “first domino to fall” or a “canary in the coal mine” or a “harbinger of collapse.” MF Global is a fractal in a frying pan. Because of the defaults that must take place (municipal debt, sovereign debt, empty box MBS, CRE, I could go on and on), MF Global is showing us an early template, or fractal structure, for how these bankruptcies are going to manifest in our daily lives. MF Global is now falling out of the frying pan and into the fire and MANY OF US WILL FOLLOW. As the flow of bankruptcies increases, our everyday lived experience will be reshaped by the realities of the new structure as it is branded on our lives—financially and emotionally.

While Gerald Celente is crying about his lost six-figure account, Bill Fleckenstein also has personal money tied up with MF Global. He is hopeful that he will get it back but is critical of the authority figures involved. Celente does not expect to get all of his money back. Ann Barnhardt of Barnhardt Capital Management has shuttered its operations after six-years in the business. She did not feel like her clients’ funds were safe in the futures and options market any more. Lawrence Lepard, who posted on Zero Hedge, wonders if the MF Global failure was a hit job done by the Fed. My point is not about who is right or wrong (time will tell), but that we are getting an early, slow paced look at things to come—the story telling, guessing, shock, denial, hopeful strategizing, negotiations. The success, failure, triumph, rage, loss, and sorrow. As we move through time and defaults, the pace of people finding out that they “can’t get to their money” is going to pick up.

Today there is headline space to chide or support Celente and Fleckenstein. Today we have time to focus on what the one MF Global bankruptcy might mean about the state of the financial industry, the health of our economy, the impotence (or outright corruption) of our government regulatory agencies, and what it means for some of us as individuals. As more and more defaults and bankruptcies occur, more and more people will be claiming to have been robbed, crying about their lost retirement/college fund/income stream. They will not be news anymore. It will be the new normal. Before this is all over, most of us are going to claim we have had “our money taken” when, in reality, we are creditors who will be caught up in massive, multiple, overlapping, bankruptcy proceedings. We will want to focus on our individual situations—who did what with our money, why it was wrong, and who should go to jail. Many of us will also be the reason someone else has to go bankrupt. We will be their crook, their robber who did this that and the other with their money. And someone might want us to go to jail for it too. We are going to be at each other’s throats, in courtrooms and on the streets.

Gerald and Bill—you are not special. Today you can garner attention and sympathy (or contempt) for your plight. Tomorrow you will be but a grain of sand in an avalanche of financial discord, fuel long burned off in a raging firestorm that will consume everything, a fractal spark that flew out of the frying pan, giving us a glimpse of the future.

My husband read this and asked, “What do you advise?” At first blush, I find advice to be condescending. Who am I to advise? Buy precious metals? Have some cash on hand out of the banking system? Take all your cash out of the collapsing financial system? Stock up on some basics for emergencies? That might be decent advice but it is not the point. We need to be flexible. Focus on one individual’s situation, one company, or one country for that matter will soon be unsustainable. Few of us will escape the consequences of participation in the financial system. It is both broken and corrupt. Our “inability to get to our money” is going to cascade into each other’s lives, blowing up all kinds of relationships. We must keep our eyes and ears peeled for stories from multiple perspectives. This is why we read ZH.

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SteveW
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MF Global

Its quite simple. Client funds are segregated and not at risk in a broker bankruptcy. Comingling of funds is theft. Theft of client funds leads to distrust of brokers. Lack of trust leads to total collapse of the market.

Once again the Chicago stockyards will be selling cattle on the hoof and not as futures.

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Ann Barnhardt on the Financial Sense

Worth listening interview of Ann Barnhardt by Jim Puplava.  

http://www.financialsense.com/financial-sense-newshour/guest-expert/2011/12/01/ann-barnhardt/entire-futures-options-market-destroyed-by-mf-global-collapse

 

Ann Barnhardt: The Entire Futures/Options Market Has Been Destroyed by the MF Global Collapse

 

Jim is joined by Ann Barnhardt, who recently closed her commodity brokerage firmBarnhardt Capital Management after the MF Global collapse. She believes that her client monies were no longer safe in the futures and options markets, and that the entire system has been 'utterly destroyed' by the MF Global collapse.

 

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txgirl69
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Ann Barnhardt interview

I've read some of her stuff before....man, she's edgy! Talk about "cowgirl up!" You read a lot of stuff from men regarding economics and financials, not too many women. I like her.

The interview is good, I appreciate her sacrificing her company for the sake of the investors - I don't know of any other manager who's done that....

 

Kudos Ann!

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Lnorris
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Ann Barnhardt interview

 I listened to her interview and read an article by Peter Brandt on James Rawles' website re: MF Global.  Both have left me seriously considering how safe our 401k's etc truly are.  After all they are just 1's and 0's on a server.  If any of these other financial institutions are heavily leveraged EU debt instruments what's to stop them from doing the same thing to their cover losses?  Not sure what the right course of action is except to continue to prepare. 

Johnny Oxygen's picture
Johnny Oxygen
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Lnorris wrote:  I listened
Lnorris wrote:

 I listened to her interview and read an article by Peter Brandt on James Rawles' website re: MF Global.  Both have left me seriously considering how safe our 401k's etc truly are.  After all they are just 1's and 0's on a server.  If any of these other financial institutions are heavily leveraged EU debt instruments what's to stop them from doing the same thing to their cover losses?  Not sure what the right course of action is except to continue to prepare. 

 

Hi Lnorris

Welcome to the site.

You may want to use the little white search box in the upper right hand corner of the page to look up '401k's'.

There has been loads of discussions here about them. You may find some useful info.

 

 

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