A long shot hope for more "free energy"

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djp169's picture
djp169
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 9 2008
Posts: 4
A long shot hope for more "free energy"

There seems to be some chance for a replacement energy source for oil, that is almost completely ignored.

A very small investment in research appears to needed, but none is happening. Is this only a crackpot Idea?

http://www.focusfusion.org/

rlee's picture
rlee
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 18 2008
Posts: 148
Re: A long shot hope for more "free energy"

Crackpot idea or not, I'm always interested in new and alternate energy sources.  For instance, the heating for my home will be via radiant water, heated by a wood gasification system.  Very clean, very efficient, and very easily obtainable, renewable fuel.  Wind for the electric energy needed for the pumps is simply a small vertical turbine mounted to the stack - hot air comes out the stack, convection turns the turbine, self sustaining!  It's not the answer to the grid, but grid or no grid, my family stays warm.

My point is this:  Keep up the research, and focus on the things you can do to make yourself sustainable.  While all of these new technologies are out there, and one or some may get us off oil, it's the same people who will control the energy.  No matter what, you will be paying the same guys to make your lights come on unless you separate yourself and your lifestyle from them.

Bob 

switters's picture
switters
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 19 2008
Posts: 744
Re: A long shot hope for more "free energy"
[quote=djp169]

There seems to be some chance for a replacement energy source for oil, that is almost completely ignored.

A very small investment in research appears to needed, but none is happening. Is this only a crackpot Idea?

http://www.focusfusion.org/

[/quote]

 

As enticing as the concept of "free energy" sounds, it would likely be a complete disaster for humanity.  With free energy our population would continue to expand exponentially and we would even more rapidly consume the finite resources available to us.  The abundance of cheap oil over the last 150 years did exactly this; why should we think it would be any different with another cheap and abundant source of energy? 

Have you read "Overshoot", by William Catton?  Without exception organisms (including humans) that encounter a large source of energy consume it without discrimination, rapidly expanding their population to the point where the energy resource is no longer able to support it.  At that point there is a large die-off.  Unfortunately, during the course of the population expansion the organisms tend to consume or pollute many of the resources in their environment, so that it is capable of supporting even fewer organisms after the die-off than it did prior to the population explosion.

One could make the argument - strongly supported by history and science - that discovering a source of energy would be the worst thing that could happen to us.  We like to think we're different than other organisms, and of course we are in many ways.  But in some ways we are the same... 

 

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