List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak oil and economic collapse.

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Amanda V's picture
Amanda V
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List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak oil and economic collapse.

I think it would be a good idea to have a list of everyone's ideas about what sort of things would be useful to have available during peak oil.  And resource depletion.  And the two of them together.  And climate change on top of that.  I thought more people could add their ideas so that there would be a long list and any body wanting to make any preparations at all could have a look at this list and decide for themselves what they think might be useful to collect or store. 

I am starting to go around garage sales on Saturday mornings and pick up stuff cheap, as well as cheap stuff on (your equivalent of) ebay.  I rekon if it is cheap enough, I will buy it and store it as even if I don't end up needing it it may be a good trade one day to someone who does.

One assumption in this list is that the transition past peak oil is gradual, or has even been entirely transitioned.   Some items will be useless in the middle of the SHTF.   Items can be ranked as low medium or high value.  Here is my brainstorming list straight from my diary - in absolutely no particular order:

Amanda's Hoarding List:

*Obviously food and water storage.  I would recommend at least 3 months worth to everyone.  Rice and dry beans eg pinto are easy to store, cheap and nutritious - but you must store in a tin so rats don't get it.

*Second hand tents (dime a dozen and if you want to accomodate friends and family in an extended type community may be useful)  Medium importance ?

*Aluminium, copper and other scrap metal: 

The rationale behind this is that as oil becomes much more expensive, so do the costs of extracting and refining metals.  Recycling values of metal will skyrocket in value.  One idea is to get junk metal now, and sell it in the future if it has gone up in value ?  Would be keen to hear what others think of this idea.  It is non corrosive and could even be buried till needed.  Medium importance ?

*Second hand clothes, shoes:  Again cheap as chips now but may go up in cost quite a bit and be hard to get hold of in future.

*Books on how to do it: eg permaculture etc.  Even if you can't learn all the information now, having it at hand would be valuable.  Even downloading information and printing it off the internet now.

*Tools:  Especially gardening tools.  Cheap second hand and will be great for sharing and trading when needed in the future.

*Warm bedding and sleeping bags.  Again, cheap if second hand

* Tins for storage.  Basically the only thing a rat won't or can't get in to.

* Bolts and Screws

*Sump oil.  It is free and plentiful, and will start any fire anywhere.

*Candles

*Coke. (no, NOT the drinking kind)  If we need blacksmiths this is the only stuff to get the fire hot enough so it will be valuable.

* Wind up clocks. 

* Solar battery chargers

*Cheap detergent

* mouse traps

* Plastic bags of all sizes will be very useful

* Drugs from chemist and other medications.  Paracetomol.  ...

*Condoms (not a joke - people will still want to have sex!)

*Nut crackers

*Rope -

*Old fashioned equipment eg pedal sewing machine.

* Fire place with a cooker is a must

*Axe for chopping firewood

*Rat bait

* Chemicals eg meths

* Mechanical tools

* washer board

 

 

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gyrogearloose
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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Hi

 Found this list.....

http://www.thepowerhour.com/news/items_disappearfirst.htm

Amusing how many of what we were targeting was on it, plus a few surprises that made sense

 

Cheers Hamish

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Amanda V
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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Hamish, that list is brilliant !  Thank you so much.  It has got stuff and reasons for it that I wouldn't have thought of.  Including puncture repair kit !!  

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

"Aluminium, copper and other scrap metal: 

The rationale behind this is that as oil becomes much more expensive,
so do the costs of extracting and refining metals.  Recycling values of
metal will skyrocket in value.  One idea is to get junk metal now, and
sell it in the future if it has gone up in value ?  Would be keen to
hear what others think of this idea.  It is non corrosive and could
even be buried till needed.  Medium importance ?"

This was a huge theft item after Katrina.  People would have copper stuff delivered to their houses and it almost seemed like the thiefs were following the delivery trucks.  Copper was also one of the biggies stripped off of houses that were not occupied in the early months.

Water, long term, for drinking, cleaning and cooking. 

In the thread that was started almost at the same time as this one, light.  Bogo lights.  Bogolight.com.  Unquestionably the best alternative light I've seen.  Expensive but forever with no further cost.  If you talk to  people who were living in New Orleans after the storm, that is one of the biggies.  Utter darkness with no ambient light at night is something we simply are not accustomed to these days. One can light up your house forever with bogo lights and not spend another penny.

Substitutes for:  toilet paper, feminine hygeine products, condoms, saran wrap & tin foil (read storage containers), etc, Everything I do now, I think, "what will I use if this isn't here anymore?"  Dish rags instead of artificial sponges....

"* Fire place with a cooker is a must" 

Well, if you have a fireplace. :)  A Global Sun Oven could be a good substitute.  If you are going to have a fire place, don't forget the Dutch oven for baking.  Cast iron cooking stuff is a good idea for any eventually.

"*Coke. (no, NOT the drinking kind)  If we need blacksmiths this is the
only stuff to get the fire hot enough so it will be valuable."

Dang! I thought you meant the snorting kind!  Where does one get coke?  I mean the kind a blacksmith would use.

Spices such as black pepper and others which aren't easily grown in shorter summer temperate climates are a good idea.   If you are not around salt water, salt, most necessary for human life and so very cheap, you could use it for insulation.

You didn't mention seeds.  Think medicinal as well as edible.  One of the really old gardening books in your area may mention how plants are used.  It is a good investment I think to find out all you can about the ethnobotany of the plants around you.  For example, in my area (S LA), a common remedy for bad coughs was derived from a plant called Erythrina herbacea which is wild all over the Gulf Coast.  Because personnel at the local hospital in Mamou, LA, would manufacture the cough syrup there, the plant became known as "mamou".  The big red seeds were dumped into boiling water and allowed to steep with a few peppermints.  It was considered an effective cough suppressent until the 1960's when I think the FDA curtailed the practice.  There are still a lot of people in your area who know the "home remedies" that worked for them.  Finding out what they know is very productive since we are going back to their time.

Rosemary

 

 

 

 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Where I am we have lots of mountains and at a very high pass I once found a small Aframe hut just big enough for two people. It was made of aluminium and lined on the inside with polysyrene. Body warmth was enough to heat it at any outside temperature. I managed to find over 30 polytyrene end sheets at 30c a sheet. I intend to cut multiple thicknesses to the size of our windows and then use packaging tape to join them. We already have insulated walls but our windows are just glass. We heat using wood but it costs and has to be available. Can make a small room of the sheets if needed to keep warm with body heat alone.

Hope it helps somoeone keep warm.

Don

_____________________________________________

7 billion people can be wrong, very wrong

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

did this a while ago and came up with this;

animal cages small
and medium

knitting wool tiger worms
axes cutting lathe metal if poss toothbrushes
axes splitting light bulbs torches
baskets log splitter transformers
beeswax lots of plastic sheeting tubs
bell machine stands umbrelllas
bikes maddocks valves
binders magnifying glasses weaving loom
binoculars maps welding gear 
bits marine plywood wet suits
boat mask  wetsuits
bolts and nuts and screws matches wheel barrows
books material to sew wheeled trailer
boots metal for lathe whistles
brooms microscope whole earth catalogues
brushes milk separator winches - hand/ electric
buckets mirrors wind generator
cable ties motors from old washing machines * wire electrical copper
candles musical instruments wire netting
carbide night vision goggle or viewer wood treatment
card board oars world radio receiver
carpet sweeper oil zips
cb radios packaging tape  
chain various sizes passive infrared sensors *  (fisher and paykel) can make
wind
chainsaw electric peddals  or water turbine 
chimmney cleaners perspex  
cleaning materials pipe  
clippers pipe sealing tape  
collars plastic bags  
concrete mix plastic sheets  
containers  plungers  
contiki or fishing kite polystyrene sheets  
copper piping possum traps  
cord and string preservatives  
crossbows preserving jars and pans  
cutters pressure sprayers  
dehydrators pullies  
dentistry tools radio antenaes  
drugs for healing rechargeable aa and aaa batteries  
drums reinforcing iron  
dynamos remote cameras  
ear plugs rice and bread cookers  
electric fans roofing iron  
electric fences rope  
electric motors rubber bands  
exe heads rubber innertubes  
eyelets rugs  
family pictures saddles  
fan belts sail  
fire grilles saw blades  
fire guards saws milling  
fish hooks scope  
fish knives screen  
fishing lines and rods sealing tape  
flippers seed  
flour miller sheet metal  
foam rubber shoes  
food grinder  shovels  
glass sheets silicon sealant  
gloves sissors  
glue skill saw blades  
goggles skin (animal) treatment  
google earth prints sleeping bags  
gps soap  
grinders solar hot water maker  
gumboots solar panels  
heat exchangers solder  
heat shrink tubing soldering irons  
heavy plate batteries spades  
HF transciever spinning wheels  
high speed drill sprockets  
horn stapler  
horse bits sticky tape  
horse reighns stretchies  
hose strirups  
hose fittings switches  
hydraulic hose and fittings sythe  
hydraulic jacks tapaulins  
insect mech thermometer  
inverters thermos's

 

 

 

 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

 

 Hi Everyone,

It is good to see that people are thinking about being prepared. With all due repect however, 3 months worth of food, water etc. is a drop in the bucket compared to long term transition and preparation.

 

I have been deeply disturbed by reponses to people who are scared by the CC to go out and buy guns. I have another suggestion, organize, talk to your neighbors and friends. Educate everyoneyou come into contact with. Think about quality of life.

 

The Transition Town movement has been deeply reassuring to me in facing the reality of our situation. Rob Hopkins says, "It is possible that life with less energy could be better."  I don't think his scenerios include people bunkered up in their houses with guns. That doesn't sound better to me.

 

This doesn't mean that it doesn't make sense to have some supplies on hand to give you some time to organize more in the event of a disaster such as an ice storm or terroist attact. Peak oil is not going to happen all at once but certainly the momentum seems to be building rapidly.

 

I heard a good joke recently: a man's wife came back from a garage sale with a whole bunch of stuff. "Look," she said proudly, "I got all this stuff before the hoarders got it!"

 

Please consider relationships first and guns last!

 

Kate

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Kate

 Guns are not on my list.  Nor are they on pir8dons's list.

However I would like a bullet proof vest.  Does anybody know where to get that ? 

Kate, nobody knows how the future will pan out.  There is not just peak oil but economic collapse and global warming.  Who knows when the next disaster is ?   Three months food would give us time for some emergency planning if necessary.

There are plenty of others who have made some very interesting points about guns on the CC forums arguing that when desparate, people will do anything - and giving evidence of cases in history.  Guns are a contentious and controversial point.  I think everybody needs to make their own decision.

However the people here I think are the ones wanting self defense.  Not to use them to go and steal from our community members.  If that makes you feel better.

 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

http://www.bulletproofme.com/

My opinion is that relationships and defense are necessary. They serve very different purposes.  To think that simply building relationships with your surrounding neighbors is somehow going to be protective is naive.  I wish it were so.  However, I do realize that it is a personal decision.

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Mark

Thanks so much for that website.  People on this forum seem to have a wealth of resources and information to share.  I am so grateful.  Also forgot to say thanks a lot Pir8don for your extensive list too.

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

I agree with workhorse in the sense of how much can one reasonably stock up on?  Will 3, 6 or even 12 months be enough?   What happens after that?   I myself have started buying extra food and just started on the water.   But, realistically, these extra provisions will run out real fast during a real long-term collapse.   Even now, just a garden variety short-term natural disaster (wild fires, ice & snow storms, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc.) is enough to cripple states.   During 911, which was short-term, emergency teams from other states had to be called in to help out.   New York City became a police state with solders and guardsmen roaming the streets and subways with loaded and pointed weapons.   If you looked the slightest bit suspicious (wearing inappropriate bulky clothing, appeared to be in a hurry, or having middle-eastern features)  they questioned and/or put you in jail immediately.  I think the most likely scenario in a long-term national emergency/collapse is that the military, national guards, and reserve will be called out in force, and the government will resort to rationing vital items such as food, water, etc.   There will be curfews, and people will have to travel with identification cards.   Mark my words, the US will most likely become a police state, and most people will not protest one bit for the good of the country.  

Again, it will be very prudent to have a stockpile of provisions.   However, everyone will not be able to run to a fully stocked spread in the mountains.   And with so so many losing their jobs now how should they prepare when they are too busy just trying to maintain enough to live day by day?

So many questions, so few answers! 

 

  

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...
workhorse1569 wrote:

I have been deeply disturbed by reponses to people who are scared by the CC to go out and buy guns. I have another suggestion, organize, talk to your neighbors and friends. Educate everyoneyou come into contact with. Think about quality of life.

I have to admit that I own several guns, although I've had them for a long time and didn't buy them in response to what I've learned on this site.  I did buy one after starting to go through the crash course, but that was mainly in anticipation of the assault weapons ban being put in place again.

I think it's a great idea to build the relationships that you mention and I'm involved with a small group here who are preparing and learning about gardening and other basic skills.  We're also learning as much as we can from another neighbor who grew up in the 1930s.

However, if you believe that peak oil is either here or is coming(which I assume the original poster does otherwise she wouldn't have asked the question) and you are stocking up on food, water, etc. then I'd highly recommend getting a gun too.  I think this is important for two reasons.  First, it allows me to hunt and provide food that way.  Second, all these relationships are nice, but if you have food and others don't, what do you think their reaction is going to be when the nearest grocery store is empty or inflation has kicked in as many on this board believe will happen?

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Workhorse,

Don't mistake ownership of guns with fear of ones community.

The world now is a big place. Xenophobia is rare and cultural boundaries are few and far between.
Travel is quick and trivial.

A collapsed economy creates a social stagnation, where a lot of the demons of the old world come back to haunt.
There are places in our society now that are impoverished, cut-off from modern culture and violent beyond what you might think a human is capable of.

I preach ownership of guns as a part of a successful, defensable and peaceful community.
In addition to that, I wholeheartedly agree with you that the first and most desirable option is peaceable solutions - especially to inter-community disputes. I don't see that this will be much of an issue.

However, once food has stopped flowing, people are starving, and the thin blue line has been breached - communities will have to act together to defend themselves. I urge you to read the following, from Dave Grossman's book "On Killing":

Quote:

"Most of the people in our society are sheep. They are kind, gentle, productive creatures who can only hurt one another by accident." This is true. Remember, the murder rate is six per 100,000 per year, and the aggravated assault rate is four per 1,000 per year. What this means is that the vast majority of Americans are not inclined to hurt one another. Some estimates say that two million Americans are victims of violent crimes every year, a tragic, staggering number, perhaps an all-time record rate of violent crime. But there are almost 300 million Americans, which means that the odds of being a victim of violent crime is considerably less than one in a hundred on any given year. Furthermore, since many violent crimes are committed by repeat offenders, the actual number of violent citizens is considerably less than two million.

Thus there is a paradox, and we must grasp both ends of the situation: We may well be in the most violent times in history, but violence is still remarkably rare. This is because most citizens are kind, decent people who are not capable of hurting each other, except by accident or under extreme provocation. They are sheep.

I mean nothing negative by calling them sheep. To me it is like the pretty, blue robin's egg. Inside it is soft and gooey but someday it will grow into something wonderful. But the egg cannot survive without its hard blue shell. Police officers, soldiers, and other warriors are like that shell, and someday the civilization they protect will grow into something wonderful.? For now, though, they need warriors to protect them from the predators.

"Then there are the wolves," the old war veteran said, "and the wolves feed on the sheep without mercy." Do you believe there are wolves out there who will feed on the flock without mercy? You better believe it. There are evil men in this world and they are capable of evil deeds. The moment you forget that or pretend it is not so, you become a sheep. There is no safety in denial.

"Then there are sheepdogs," he went on, "and I'm a sheepdog. I live to protect the flock and confront the wolf."

If you have no capacity for violence then you are a healthy productive citizen, a sheep. If you have a capacity for violence and no empathy for your fellow citizens, then you have defined an aggressive sociopath, a wolf. But what if you have a capacity for violence, and a deep love for your fellow citizens? What do you have then? A sheepdog, a warrior, someone who is walking the hero's path. Someone who can walk into the heart of darkness, into the universal human phobia, and walk out unscathed.

The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, can not and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheep dog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed. The world cannot work any other way, at least not in a representative democracy or a republic such as ours.

Still, the sheepdog disturbs the sheep. He is a constant reminder that there are wolves in the land. They would prefer that he didn't tell them where to go, or give them traffic tickets, or stand at the ready in our airports in camouflage fatigues holding an M-16. The sheep would much rather have the sheepdog cash in his fangs, spray paint himself white, and go, "Baa."

Until the wolf shows up. Then the entire flock tries desperately to hide behind one lonely sheepdog.  

Source:
http://www.gleamingedge.com/mirrors/onsheepwolvesandsheepdogs.html

Cheers, and may you live peaceably.
May the day for violence never come - but until it does, I know some of us will be training in defense of our community, family and loved ones. I live to protect the flock and confront the wolf.

Aaron

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

csstudent,

I agree with your post.  Desperate people can do desperate things.  I dread the day that I might need to defend my family and friends with a gun.  But, I realize that it is a very real possibility.  As Chris pointed out.  "I would have a hard time forgiving myself if I needed to prepare but did nothing"  Shooting can be just as enjoyable as Golf, Gardening, Baseball or any other past time.  But, it has the added benefit of providing protection.  Lastly, what are each of us doing to provide for others that did not prepare or did not prepare as fully?  Charity is important.  Be sure to include this on your list as well.  Additionally, learn how to provide charity at arms length.  For example, if you provided some desperate person with food, they will return for more and perhaps bring friends.  If you gave to a local food bank or church, you could direct the person to this place and eliminate becoming a target.

JSR

 

 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

"
Dang! I thought you meant the snorting kind!  Where does one get coke?  I mean the kind a blacksmith would use."

Blacksmiths don't use coke (well some might..! Wink )  the ones I  know use charcoal, and they make it themselves by burning wood in a low oxygen environment, easy to do, just google it.

Mike 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

While the list I have posted is extensive it is by no means exhaustive and many things that I have considered are only on paper.

The strategy that worked for me was to list everything no matter how outlandish or unlikely and then keep adding over time. This had the effect in the early days of panic to make me feel that I at least was doing something.

I prioritised my list according to our need and cost. No matter how much you have stored, growing food and keeping livestock are of course the only ways to provide longer term food security.

Consider the worst, prepare for it then put it aside. When I bought a crossbow I had to think carefully about why. I had told myself it was for small game but I am not so sure I was being honest with myself. Now it sits alone and ignored in a dark cupboard.

Don

________________________________

7 billion people can be wrong, very wrong 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Spending money on guns when you should invest it in water tanks is simply silly.  We have two 5,500 gallon tanks here, and have never run out even at the height of the last drought....

" if you have food and others don't, what do you think their reaction is
going to be when the nearest grocery store is empty or inflation has
kicked in as many on this board believe will happen?"

That depends on what you grow....

If you have a patch of beans peas carrots and broccoli, yes there's a good chance you'll lose it.  But if you grow PERMACULTURE alternatives, like Cassava, Pigeon Peas, Tahitian Spinach, Arrowroot and a host of others, raiders will walk straight past them thinking they are ornamentals.

BTW, the above list is some of what we grow in the sub-tropics, research what grows in your area, JOIN A PERMACULTURE group...  they will invariably know.

Mike 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

You may want to check these two sites out - they have lots of lists that will help you prepare.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/index.php

http://survivalblog.com/ 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Mike,

Are your tanks above ground?  I assume you are on well water.

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

This listing of items is a good idea. I plan to use it since many things would not occur to me. How much to store seems to vary quite a bit among the readers. I store quite a bit of food but not so much of other items.

I can sort of understand a person being afraid of the citizens arming themselves, but I don't share the sentiment. It seems to me it will be the biggest determent to crime and household invasion and a possible police state. Predators look for the easy prey, and the predators will be well-armed. Why do you think the govt wants us disarmed?

We have had guns for decades and have a very different attitude than that of those opposed to an armed citizenry. If there is a law and order breakdown (I don't expect it), the citizens will become their own law enforcement in communities across the nation.

There is much publicity given to lone nuts killing people at malls or businesses or schools, but very little about the many who have saved their families and others from attack because they were armed. That is no accident when a media is a controlled media and the ptb wish to remove the guns. If that were to happen, we would be easy prey. Americans are not going to let this so-called govt. disarm them since it is a real safeguard against the ptb. So, we can only agree to disagree on this hot topic.

I would rather have and not need than need and not have. And of course I hope I will not need.Remember, the 2nd amendment was added to protect the people from the govt. They (founders) knew what they were about.

I will just add oil lamps to the listing. 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Hey guys,
It seems funny to me that many of these survival lists are simply a list of material objects. I have a suspicion that the most effective way to prepare oneself for the collapse is to accumulate things which have practically no expiration date and can never be taken away from you. By this, I mean Skills, knowledge, experience, and relationships.

For example, I can read an article on wikipedia and know, in theory, how to play the violin. This is knowledge, at least in my definition of it.

Then, I can practice the violin and gain the skill necessary to actually play it.

In order to actually use this skill, I'm going to have to initiate real experiences where I use it. I'm going to need to go to jam sessions, and perform in front of people to really consider myself a musician. Experience is really important to developing a skill, and this fact is quite often lost in this western mindset of ours. A teacher of mine always emphasized experience over knowledge, and if you've ever read a how-to about something, and then tried to do it, you'll realize how vital experience is, and how much more it teaches you than someone else's words.

Finally, now that I can play the violin, I want to have relationships with people who are better ( and worse) at it than I am, and people who play other instruments so we can make really beautiful music, these relationships help my own under standing of the instrument and my practical application of it.

I apply this idea to many different kinds of things.

A question is then, what kind of knowledge/skills/experiences do I want to form, and which people do I want to have relationships with?

For the first part, I would say permaculture, highly developed awareness and naturalist skills ( interestingly, I'm pretty sure these go hand in hand), martial arts, herbalism, vibrant health, a developed physique that is accustomed to traveling long distances without food, water, or sleep, camping/ wilderness survival skills, weapons/stealth knowledge, hunting, and very developed nonviolent communication/ interpersonal skills/charisma ( after starving in the woods with somebody for days, you needs to know this to survive with people...trust me)

and as far as relationships go, I would say to place a greater importance on a persons likeness of mind with you, their ability to adapt and learn swiftly,and their love and affection for you, than whatever practical skills/ knowledge/experience they have. For example, you certainly wouldn't want an aloof veteran with PSTD to be one of your companions in a trying situation, no matter what he brings to the table.

Don't get me wrong, stocking needed items for survival should be a priority, but I believe these other things to be much more valuable, useful, and hard to come by.

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Wells are rarely used in Australia, the driest continent.

Yes our tanks are above ground, we collect rain off the roof and use first flush systems to control bird shit problems etc.

Mike 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

<quote>Spending money on guns when you should invest it in water tanks is simply silly.<quote>

Excellent post, Mike.  I am going right now to start a thread called "alternatives to guns".  I do have a story to tell there, and am wondering always in amazement why guns are seen as the ultimate defense.

Rosemary

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csstudent
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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

I wanted to make a few comments on some of the posts in this thread.

First, if you believe peak oil is imminent or already here, another Katrina hits, etc and you have food, water, medical supplies, how are people going to react if they need these items?  Take a look at this video from a wal-mart: 

 

That was from people trying to save $5 on a tickle me elmo doll or some other trivial thing.  Now imagine that they are hungry because trucks can't deliver food to stores or that the cost of food is so expensive because peak oil has hit and gas prices have skyrocketed.  What will their reaction be?  You have to remember that in a lot of ways, people in our society are just like dogs.  Most dogs have been domesticated so much that they couldn't survive without somebody putting food in their bowl.  In our society, many people rely on the human equivalent of a dog bowl to survive, a grocery store or a restaurant.

As somebody else mentioned, having a gun around can also be a recreational activity.  2 or 3 times a month my wife and I drop the kids off at my parent's house and go to the gun range to shoot and have a great time. 

Second, somebody else mentioned learning skills.  I think that is an outstanding idea.  I'm a part of a small group that is working together to learn skills that could be useful in a post peak oil world or if another Katrina hits or if we have to live through the modern day equivalent of the 1930s.  We all focus on stocking up on food, water, ammo, etc.  But we also focus on skills that can be useful to get through that.  So for example, one person is an expert at medical issues, another specializes in hunting and fishing and another is learning about wild plants and which ones are safe to eat or which ones should be avoided.  My wife is the gardening expert in the group.  We actually came up with a list of about 8 or 9 different skills that we should focus on and learn.  We're also getting tips and tricks from a neighbor who grew up in the 1930s and to this day still has a depression era mindset about frugality and simple living that you very rarely see anymore.

 

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List of skills to acquire for the post peak melt down blah ....

I think they are after the X boxes in the video.   It is an eye opener !

Right:  Lets have a skills list then:

* First Aid

*Permaculture and organic gardening

*Food Preservation

*Building/use of tools

Hunting and fishing

* Wild edible plants

* Animal Husbandry

  CSStudent maybe we could have the rest of the list your people are learning ?  You are lucky you have a group of people already commited to living in a community and sharing and preparing.  My neighbours just think I'm mad.

 

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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...
AmandaPops wrote:

Mark

Thanks so much for that website.  People on this forum seem to have a wealth of resources and information to share.  I am so grateful. 

My wife was checking out vest sites, but I pointed out to her that getting one into NZ was likely to require a police waiver.

Haven't checked so best start there if you are serious.

Cheers Hamish

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Amanda V
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Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Hamish your memory is unbelievable to remember I am in NZ.

Secondly, what on earth do you mean, a police waiver ?  From your police or ours ?  I will call our local police station and find out.  Thanks again.

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Re: List of skills to acquire for the post peak melt down ...
AmandaPops wrote:

I think they are after the X boxes in the video.   It is an eye opener !

Right:  Lets have a skills list then:

* First Aid

*Permaculture and organic gardening

*Food Preservation

*Building/use of tools

Hunting and fishing

* Wild edible plants

* Animal Husbandry

  CSStudent maybe we could have the rest of the list your people are learning ?  You are lucky you have a group of people already commited to living in a community and sharing and preparing.  My neighbours just think I'm mad.

Here's a list of the skills that we identified as being important and felt we needed to learn.  I'm sure there are others, but there are only a small number of us.

Hunting
Fishing
Plant knowledge(safe to eat, poisonous, medical uses)
Gardening
Food preparation and preservation
Gun knowledge - maintenance, repair, etc

Trapping
Ammo reloading
Ham radio and communications
Medical/first aid

Fire starting skills

 

I should also mention that we take the approach that just because somebody is learning about say medical and first aid knowledge, doesn't mean the others can ignore that.  In fact, that person's job is to teach what they've learned to the others in our group.  They would also make recommendations for what we should all have as a minimum for medical supplies.

I'd also be careful about telling your neighbors for the reason you mention.  Plus, I really don't want people to know that I have food, water, ammo, etc stored up.  The people I am involved with I met through a local group that supported Ron Paul for president.  From talking to a few of them, we all realized we were of the same mindset about preparing. 

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Re: Cheap solar power

I think many people do not engage with solar power believing that it is either too expensive or too complex;

Almost every automobile contains a 12 volt battery. Inverters convert 12 volts to mains voltage. They usually plug into a cigarette lighter or have red and black clips. They have a mains outlet socket just like a wall socket. The cheapest are very cheap but still work. Not for sensitive equipment but they are fine for lights. Security lights are also cheap (chineese) especially without bulbs. You may need to find someone who knows how to wire a plug. Mains led lights are getting cheaper every day. Energy saver bulbs are already cheap. Power usage is measured in watts. A cheap inverter will give you 150watts or more. From that you can run a large number of security lights and/or internal lights so long as they are either led (best for security lights) or energy saver. Even 5 watt energ saver lamps produce a good light. 

Beware of running leads where they could get wet and do not have a plug and socket outside unless you can completely waterproof it. 

You can use a battery charger to charge your car battery when the ordinary mains is on. The battery will have a + sign for the positive terminal or red colour. Do not overcharge. Most car batteries will run a 150 watt inverter for many tens of hours before needing a charge. 

Do not have the battery in your living space because they can give off a bad gas when charging and are not safe if overcharged.

Disconnect the inverter when not in use.

Don

A lot of us Kiwi's in this thread!

_______________________________________

7 billion people can be wrong, very wrong

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capesurvivor
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Posts: 963
Re: Cheap solar power

Yeah,

 

You guys have a lot of sun!!!

 

SG

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A. M.
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Posts: 2367
Re: List of Stuff to Collect in preparation for post peak ...

Don't forget the importance of every day items that are either consumable or disposible.

I don't think I saw Toilet Paper mentioned.
Might start saving last years phone books...

Look into ways societies dealt with feminine hygeine and toiletries in the past - Hydrogen Peroxide makes a good mouth wash, salt can be used for tooth paste and so on. Hygeine is probably the "third" most important item for Long term health, right behind breathable air and sustanance.

In addition, if you're looking for things to barter or trade, don't forget the importance of having a good bicycle with a few spare tires and inter-tubes. A spare chain perhaps.

Think of how difficult life would be without a decent backpack. I haven't seen that mentioned.

All this aside, Liam gave a brilliant post - Skills will get you a lot farther than possessions.
Practice today what you'd prepare for tomorrow. 
I think one of the "first" steps is stop wasting! Compost, recycle and reuse anything that you can. Milk jugs can be re-used for water storage as can bottles for juice and the like. They take up space, but that'll have to be addressed eventually anyway ;) Great thread!

Cheers!

Aaron

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