Lessons From Katrina

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SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
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Lessons From Katrina

An excellent resource from someone who lived through Katrina and the lessons learned from that experience. Very applicable to all the preparations we are, and/or should be, making:

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/p/map.html

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Hey Sam --

I did a quick scan through some of the materials on this site and it seems like there's a goodly amount of useful info here.  Thanks for the link, man!

Viva -- Sager 

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Hi Sam

Similarly a quick look seems to agree with SagerXX. Thanks for the link.

I would also suggest these in case they aren't obvious on the site. They are from http://www.ranprieur.com/

"no murders in the Superdome, no gunfire on aid helicopters, and powerless people in the French Quarter formed tribes, while white vigilante gangs hunted and killed black men in the name of keeping order"  

Don

_________________________________________________

So few then with so many ways, so many now with so few ways

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Re: Lessons From Katrina
pir8don wrote:

Hi Sam

Similarly a quick look seems to agree with SagerXX. Thanks for the link.

I would also suggest these in case they aren't obvious on the site. They are from http://www.ranprieur.com/

"no murders in the Superdome, no gunfire on aid helicopters, and powerless people in the French Quarter formed tribes, while white vigilante gangs hunted and killed black men in the name of keeping order"  

Don

_________________________________________________

So few then with so many ways, so many now with so few ways

Don,

I read the links you posted above. Scary stuff. It boggles the mind to think this kind of crap is still going on in America. I wonder if it will ever end? Sigh............

I also read some of the "ranprieur" stuff and found this part interesting:

My big scene in the "What A Way To Go" movie was telling the Parable of
the Tribes, which comes from a book of that name by Andrew Bard
Schmookler: there are a bunch of tribes living peacefully, and then one
of them turns its energy to war, and whether the other tribes run away,
or submit, or fight back, the violent paradigm expands into their
territory, and this process continues until it consumes the whole
world. But this story does the same thing looking backward in time that
the utopians and dystopians do looking forward: it draws an imaginary
line beyond which the turmoil of history stills, and there is no change.

I think there have always been warlike tribes, and there always will
be. A society that turns its energy to war and conquest will always
defeat a society that lives in peace, because it can fight better; but
then, a peaceful and cooperative social order will always defeat a
violent and repressive social order, because it's a better way to live.
These two systems have existed in balance since the beginning of time,
the violent systems sweeping through the peaceful systems and burning
out like fires.

Only when grain agriculture released the energy of topsoil, and
industry released the energy of oil, did the fire of the violent tribes
rise to engulf the world. Now that the fuel is running out, we are
entering a new age, neither an age of increase nor an age of low-level
equilibrium, but an age of high-level equilibrium, more complex and
chaotic than prehistory because so many technologies and energy sources
will survive.

In a world like this, it will be impossible to build any kind of
enduring large system. Our path, instead, will be to continually break
down the repressive systems, dodge the conquering systems, and rebuild good systems through the cracks, forever. Actually I think that will be more fun than Utopia.

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Sam:

    Thanks.  This is wonderful.  I'm a constant lurker on this forum; I don't post much (or at all).  I

had to write and thank you.  My favorite section was "PHILOSOPHY - Flowchart of Survival Strategy"

I thought the author put the survivalist preparations in good perspective.  The survivalists are constructing a life boat.

I agree that is important.  However, the ultimate goal is getting back home; not spending the rest of your

life in a lifeboat. Thanks again.

 

Mark

 

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Hi Sam

You aren't coming my way are you? Laughing

He is presenting a similar view to that of Daniel Quinn in your quoted piece.

Ran presents a point of view with which I almost completely agree. Here is a link I got from him too. You might enjoy it.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9208714/

Don

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here  ...
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Re: Lessons From Katrina
pir8don wrote:

Hi Sam

You aren't coming my way are you? Laughing

He is presenting a similar view to that of Daniel Quinn in your quoted piece.

Ran presents a point of view with which I almost completely agree. Here is a link I got from him too. You might enjoy it.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9208714/

Don

_____________________

still ...
here  ...
still here
still here?

Hi Don,

Am I coming your way? Hmmmm - let's just say that I think people can work together in small groups (tribes) for a short time - especially when needed for mutual survival. Your New Orleans links provide proof of that.

Where I think we part ways is your suggestion of the tribal model as a permanent solution. Last year I went round-and-round with Mike (Damnthematrix) about the same concept.

Personally, I still don't think that Americans can function in "tribes" for very long. We are too diverse of a people with too many conflicting agendas.

Where communities already exist in harmony (small towns/villages), the "tribe" concept can work. However, try to divvy up a large population into "tribes" and you'll effectively be trying to herd cats!  Wink

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Hi Sam

You might of course be right.

But it is something possible unlike changing greedy politicians and bankers. It only needs a few successes to get the attention of the rest and maybe to teach them. In essence it is really only encouraging community although of a specific kind. I agree it isn't going to work for most people yet. I also think it is in our genes (memes). 

Maybe needs must. Can we do harm by trying?

Don

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

Don,

I admire your continued optimism. Laughing

Perhaps I've spent too long as a pessimist/realist to believe that your vision would ever become a reality in my lifetime.

Indeed, there is no harm in trying - however, if my one cat is any example, you'll spend a lifetime trying to herd the rest! Wink

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Re: Lessons From Katrina

I've spent some more time reading the "Listening to Katrina" website and this guy -- apart from having lots of good advice -- totally cracks me up.  Here he is discussing having various Escape Plans -- the 60-second plan (i.e., you have to be out of the house in 1 minute) or "PLAN ALPHA" -- the 1-hour plan or "PLAN BETA" and then there's this:

"ESCAPE PLAN GREEK ALPHABET LETTER THAT COMES AFTER BETA, also known as the 12 hour plan.  You can see some danger - like a hurricane - coming a long way off.  You have time to pack the car, secure the house, maybe have a nap, and then drive out.  You are standing in the middle of your living room in your sombrero and nothing else, drinking Thai iced tea when you are suddenly struck by the notion that you should leave in a few hours for a long vacation from which you may or may not return."

I want to know what possesses a man to drink Thai iced tea in the living room wearing nothing but a sombrero.  Or...maybe I don't.  I guess one never knows until one tries it for oneself.

Thanks again Sam for turning me on to this site.

VIVA -- Sager 

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more lessons from Katrina

An amazing recap, with annecdotal tyhings that bioggle the mind and very, very practical tips. An example:

33. Your personal and/or corporate supplies and facilities may be commandeered without warning, receipt or compensation. I’ve had numerous reports from in and near the disaster zone of individuals (e.g. boat-owners, farmers with barns, tractors, etc.) and corporate groups (e.g. companies with heavy equipment, churches with halls, etc.) finding an official on their doorstep demanding the use of their facilities or equipment. If they demurred, they were told that this was an “emergency situation” and that their assistance was being required, not requested. Some of them have lost track of the heavy equipment “borrowed” in this way, and don’t know where it is, whether or not it’s still in good condition, and when (if ever) it will be returned - and in the meantime, they can’t continue their normal operations without this equipment. Others have had their land and facilities effectively confiscated for use by rescue and relief workers, storage of supplies, etc. In some cases, in the absence of their owners, the property of the individuals and groups concerned (e.g. farm gasoline and diesel supplies, the inventory of motor vehicle dealers, suppliers of foodstuffs, tarpaulins, etc.) have been commandeered and used by law enforcement and relief workers, without permission, receipts, reimbursement, etc. Protests have been met with denials, threats of arrest, insinuations of being “uncaring” and “un-co-operative”, etc. Lesson learned if you’ve got what officials need in a time of crisis, forget about Constitutional protections of your property! Sure, you can sue after the fact, but if you need your goods and facilities for your own survival, you’re basically SOL. Those of us who stockpile necessities for potential crises like this might want to consider concealing our stockpiles to prevent confiscation and if you need certain equipment for your own day-to-day use (e.g. tractors for farmers, generators, etc.), you might have a hard time retaining possession of these things. This problem applies to relief workers also I’ve had several reports of private relief workers (e.g. those sent in by churches, etc.) having their vehicles and supplies commandeered by “official” relief workers, without compensation or receipt, and being kicked out of the disaster area with warnings not to return. The fact that the “private” workers were accomplishing rather more than the “official” workers was apparently of no importance. 

Here is the link to the full article: Lessons From Katrina.

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Here is source

Safewrite

Good post with valuable advice.  Here is a link to the original source with expanded information.

http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2008/08/lessons-learned-from-hurricanes-katrina.html

The author is a very interesting man with amazing experiences.  He runs a very entertaining web site on many topics.

I also recommend this book.  http://www.amazon.com/Great-New-Orleans-Gun-Grab/dp/0970981333/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1313603398&sr=8-1

Travlin 

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My bad







I forgot that gun topics should be confined to The Definitive Firearms Thread. I will repost the book link there. Please go there for any discussion.

Travlin

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Travlin
Travlin wrote:

Safewrite

Good post with valuable advice.  Here is a link to the original source with expanded information.

http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2008/08/lessons-learned-from-hur...

 

The author is a very interesting man with amazing experiences.  He runs a very entertaining web site on many topics.

I also recommend this book.  http://www.amazon.com/Great-New-Orleans-Gun-Grab/dp/0970981333/ref=sr_1_...

Travlin 

 

Agreed.  Thanks for that post Safewrite.  I didn't think Uncle Sam would get quite that ballsy ... yet.  That's why it's always good to keep a low profile.  And thanks for that additional information Travlin. 

 

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ao
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ao wrote: Travlin
ao wrote:
Travlin wrote:

Safewrite

Good post with valuable advice.  Here is a link to the original source with expanded information.

http://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2008/08/lessons-learned-from-hur...

 

The author is a very interesting man with amazing experiences.  He runs a very entertaining web site on many topics.

I also recommend this book.  http://www.amazon.com/Great-New-Orleans-Gun-Grab/dp/0970981333/ref=sr_1_...

Travlin 

 

Agreed.  Thanks for that post Safewrite.  I didn't think Uncle Sam would get quite that ballsy ... yet.  That's why it's always good to keep a low profile.  And thanks for that additional information Travlin. 

Travlin,

I just read your links.  Heavy stuff.  I'm going to take it over to the Definitive Firearms thread for discussion.  Thanks again.

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