keeping warm in the snow country

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eexpo's picture
eexpo
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 30 2011
Posts: 51
keeping warm in the snow country

Hi Everyone,

I have to travel into the snow country and sleep in the back of a pickup truck with a camper shell.My worry is how to stay warm .Will sleeping bag and blankets be enough?Are there any battery powered portable heaters available? I dont want propane or run it off my truck battery for obvious reasons.Your help is needed?

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3125
eexpo wrote: Hi Everyone, I
eexpo wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I have to travel into the snow country and sleep in the back of a pickup truck with a camper shell.My worry is how to stay warm .Will sleeping bag and blankets be enough?Are there any battery powered portable heaters available? I dont want propane or run it off my truck battery for obvious reasons.Your help is needed?

"Snow country" is rather loosely identified.  If I'm going to the Adirondacks I want a -20F sleeping bag.  If I'm camping around where I am (definitely snow country) a zero or -10F will do.  Get some kind of pad to sleep on, they provide insulation also.

Estatesavr's picture
Estatesavr
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 12 2009
Posts: 77
we live in 'snow country'

 eexpo,

we live in snow country so can offer these thoughts:

  1. you can never dress too warm - but should sleep very lightly clothed (seeming paradox)
  2. dress in layers - merino wool long johns rock!
  3. use chemical body warmers (like hand warmers but larger) - put in your bag at super time and then shove down where your feet are
  4. put your clothes for the next day in the foot of your bag
  5. make sure whatever sleep pad you use is insulated - pure air pads get cold
  6. maybe cut a piece of reflective foil insulation and place between your pad & your bag
  7. if i were you i'd invest in a 'Wiggys' bag - they are, in my opinion, the very best made and you will not be cold http://www.wiggys.com/#
  8. eat a good, hot meal before going to sleep - that stokes your metabolism and will keep your warmer
  9. wear a stocking cap to bed
  10. make sure you park in very secure areas -- truck stops and rest stops are havens for criminals and those who do not wish you well
  11. keep flashlight, self defense and camp shoes at hand in case you need to get up & out fast

hope these help

Jake

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earthwise
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2009
Posts: 846
A Canine Solution

 

How big is your sleeping bag??

The official commentary included in the CD set Celebrate: The Three Dog Night Story, 1965-1975 states that vocalist Danny Hutton's then-girlfriend June Fairchild suggested the name after reading a magazine article about indigenous Australians, in which it was explained that on cold nights they would customarily sleep in a hole in the ground whilst embracing a dingo, a native species of wild dog. On colder nights they would sleep with two dogs and if the night was freezing, it was a "three dog night".[1]

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joesxm2011
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 16 2011
Posts: 259
Wiggy's Bag

I have the Wiggy two part bag which is the zero degree mummy bag with the outer shell that takes it down to -40 I think.  He calls it the FRTSS systme or something like that.

I love my Wiggy's bag.  When we lost power and the house was cold I put the bag on top of my bed and slept in it.  I liked it so much that I continue to sleep in the Wiggy's bag.

I bought a silk "cocoon" bag liner so I don't have to wash the Wiggy's bag as often.

I highly recommend the Wiggy's bag for cold weather sleeping.

It may be a little large when in the stuff sack for carrying in a pack, but other than that it is ideal.

 

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1891
Don't Forget Good Thermals!

Another suggestion:

I've found that the cheap Hanes or Fruit-of-the-Loom thermals are okay, but somewhat scratchy. Not as good as the better good stuff like Duofold dual-later thermals. I got a deal when I hit a couple of Ocean State Job Lots in New England earlier this month, picked them up for $12 to $15 per top or bottom when normally they are $30+ (though the men's selection was practically picked clean in some places). Wear that under a sweater and under pants, wear the microfiber fuzzy socks, and you'll be very happy in your sleeping bag.

Poet

Roundhouse's picture
Roundhouse
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 14 2008
Posts: 36
 I've spend some 60 days on

 I've spend some 60 days on Mt Mckinley (Denali) in the course of two expeditions and slept in temps below -30F.  It's all a matter of good attitude and good gear.  We used down bags on the first expedition and synthetic down on the second.  Given a choice, I prefer down for warmth but it doesn't work for ($&% if any moisture is introduced.  A goretex bivi bag helps both reduce the chance of moisture and adds a bit of insulation.  Also agree on the sleeping pad suggestion.  We used two; a thin foam pad on the bottom and a self-inflating mattress above to provide some addtional insulation and comfort.  (don't underestimate the comfort factor)!  Personally, I would skip the fancy electric options for warmth.  And don't forget a good stove to provide endless hot beverages which help re-hydrate and warm from the inside.  Also agree on the hot meal which provides calories to burn for heat.  I read somewhere that you need some rediculous number of calories to stay warm at the temps we were climbing in but can't recall exactly what that was (I'm old now) 

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