It is not a junk pile it is a resource pile.

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Ken C's picture
Ken C
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 13 2009
Posts: 753
It is not a junk pile it is a resource pile.

A few days ago my daughter asked if I would help them build a go cart for my grand kids. The translation is- would I build a go cart for the grand kids. Sure- of course I will.

I pretty well finished it up today and I am proud to say that most of it came from my recycle "resource pile" that I keep out back. Not very much of it did I have to buy from the the hardware store. I think people that don't know how to recycle perfectly good material into useful products are missing a bet. This will be especially true as we get past the "shtf" era when material may be more difficult to acquire.

Certainly my wife calls it my junk pile  but that is not the way I see it. All of that junk will be a useful resource someday.

 

What have you built from your junk resource pile?

 

Ken

 

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: It is not a junk pile it is a resource pile.

Hi, Kenc;

Running to the "resource pile" is a common occurrence at our place.  Recent on site recycling has included several tree trunks being used as walls for two very large raised bed gardens, a drainage grate finding new life on our fire pit, pine limbs being used to build garden structures, wooden pallets continuing their usefulness as a shed for drying freshly milled lumber, which will, in turn, be used to build new shelving for our burgeoning library. 

In our hardscaping projects, we use stone, rather than concrete or asphalt, as it is endlessly recyclable.  We've taken over a utility easement between fences adjacent to our property to store a variety of "resources".  It is so handy to just go rummaging "between the fences", when we need a bit of flagstone or cobblestone, chicken wire or hardware cloth, or any of the other myriad items that are left over after projects or scrounged from job sites or roadsides.  Additionally, it cuts our gasoline expenses, as we're not running out to the lumber yard or stone yard whenever we get an impromptu project going. 

We've got a 12 foot utility trailer with a small crane that we use to move logs, which are sometimes from our property, and sometimes scrounged elsewhere.  The solid wood goes to the mill, and is dried in our pallet sheds.  It's wonderful to have a stash of hickory, oak, and cherry on hand for building projects.  The damaged wood gets used as firewood.  The ashes become a key component of my homemade organic fertilizer (potash content).  The incompletely burned charcoal goes into a bin to be used for emergency water filtration.

In addition to our inventory of rough raw materials and, of course, food, I keep a stash of fabrics, like canvas and mosquito netting, for repairs and quickly improvised items.  I also keep an inventory of basic household chemical raw materials (e.g. glycerine, calcium carbonate, magnesium citrate, sodium bicarbonate, vinegar, etc.) for making household cleaners, medicines, and personal care compounds.  If one of us develops a rash or headache, or runs out of toothpaste or deodorant, there's no trip to the corner store . . . . I just whip up a remedy or compound, or improvise a dressing or sling.  My neighbors are starting to catch on . . . one young man stopped in the other day after a motocross accident . . . . I was able to fix him up with a sling and some arnica linament to tide him over until he could get more definitive care. 

All of that is rather mundane next to all of the remarkable items my hubby will throw together at a moment's notice.  When I recently threw my back out, within 20 minutes he put together a treatment table in the livingroom, and a platform so that I could use my laptop easily in a standing position.  Without them, I'd never have recovered so quickly. 

As you can see, I could go on and on . . . . We really prefer to build most things ourselves, as it gives us a sense of being self-reliant, and allows us to customize installations to our specific circumstances.

Well, you see, I could go on and on, but you get the picture . . . We're both avid fans of having raw materials on hand.

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 14 2008
Posts: 1258
Re: It is not a junk pile it is a resource pile.

 Ken , You would fit into our neighborhood .   Are you sure you are not my husbands best friend : )

   We have had to build a shed out of the used materials  to hold more used lumber windows,doors, siding etc.   My husband and sons added a 16x24' room on to our house with new and used items  total cost under $6000 and when you put paint on them no one is wiser.  Even recycled paint from County recycling center .

 They built my 12x16 ' green house ,shelves, and all  using other people throw away .. costing  less than $200 because we went to town and stocked up on nails and screws.

  One of our best junk pile investments is the spare cars my husband uses for parts .  I call it Yard Art and curse when I mow  but every time I need a door handle or windshield I get the" I told you so .. and you wanted me to send these to salvage$ 100 !"Speech. And boy  the number of people that stop and want to buy the old 79 Chevy truck bones that are left from the pickins .

  I grew up with an old Opel sitting out back ... my brothers and I traveled the imaginary world around in that thing.  I have yet to figure out how we had so many free hours !   Now my Sons have drug an old boat home .. they intend  to fix it up so the grandkids can take imaginary "Gilligan style" trips.

  We have found you  make  new friends and take their throw away things .  Our son-in-laws  father worked at the Landfill  he has built a mighty fortress from the treasures he has drug home.   His first find was a nearly new cement mixer .     If you build a big enough fence the  outside people do not have a clue  and  Your oldest , truest, friends know you and love you anyway.

 

Ken C's picture
Ken C
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 13 2009
Posts: 753
Re: It is not a junk pile it is a resource pile.
Full Moon wrote:

 Ken , You would fit into our neighborhood .   Are you sure you are not my husbands best friend : )

   We have had to build a shed out of the used materials  to hold more used lumber windows,doors, siding etc.   My husband and sons added a 16x24' room on to our house with new and used items  total cost under $6000 and when you put paint on them no one is wiser.  Even recycled paint from County recycling center .

 They built my 12x16 ' green house ,shelves, and all  using other people throw away .. costing  less than $200 because we went to town and stocked up on nails and screws.

  One of our best junk pile investments is the spare cars my husband uses for parts .  I call it Yard Art and curse when I mow  but every time I need a door handle or windshield I get the" I told you so .. and you wanted me to send these to salvage$ 100 !"Speech. And boy  the number of people that stop and want to buy the old 79 Chevy truck bones that are left from the pickins .

  I grew up with an old Opel sitting out back ... my brothers and I traveled the imaginary world around in that thing.  I have yet to figure out how we had so many free hours !   Now my Sons have drug an old boat home .. they intend  to fix it up so the grandkids can take imaginary "Gilligan style" trips.

  We have found you  make  new friends and take their throw away things .  Our son-in-laws  father worked at the Landfill  he has built a mighty fortress from the treasures he has drug home.   His first find was a nearly new cement mixer .     If you build a big enough fence the  outside people do not have a clue  and  Your oldest , truest, friends know you and love you anyway.

 

 

Wow,

 

I am clearly a piker compared to you and cloud. I have a very small lot so that limits what I can do anyway. I keep thinking that it sure would be nice to be out of town and have a much bigger patch of land. (room for more junk).

 

Ken

 

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