Interesting Article on what some people are doing to prepare.

24 posts / 0 new
Last post
Ed Archer's picture
Ed Archer
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 12 2008
Posts: 225
Interesting Article on what some people are doing to prepare.

Found this article in my local paper about what people are doing or thinking about peak oil, I'm sure some will find this interesting.

 

http://www.thestar.com/article/587952

 

 

joe2baba's picture
joe2baba
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2008
Posts: 807
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

had a talk with my anarcho-libertarian friend arly the other night abut the bailout- stimuloridiculous plans.

anyway we have these sessions about once every two weeks. the ice storm really was a wakeup call for everyone here. fugedaboudit peak oil.

but arly raised an interesting issue which i had never thought of before. not only is it a good thing to stock up on grains and beans and things but for those of us into let us say an alternative lifestyle certain consumable contraband is probably going to be a growth market. specifically pot. arly by his own reckoning is the king of marijuana growing so he sees peak oil as a huge business opportunity. 

he is also stocking up on yeast and sugar. he is constructing a still as well. he plans on becoming if not very wealthy but very comfortable thank you very much. kinda reminds me of how the mafia got so big in the thirties. i happen to remember in chris's bio that he is becoming adept at beer and wine making. once again the prof is ahead of the curve. another item to add to the grow list will be tobacco. some of you might be seeing a pattern here. i can only hope that 12 step programs survive the coming storm.

one last little item for now. it might be a good idea to become friends with the little old lady down the street that grows those beautiful flowers in her garden you know the red ones. the ones she seems to cut with a razor and collect the sap. we just might need some opium for its painkilling quatlities.

oh and btw arly said he didnt care if i mentioned him in this post you see he is armed to the teeth. yep the anarcho - libertarian movement is alive and well in the back woods of arkansas

have a nice day y'all and come and visit when ya kin

joe

tune in next time for mushroom growing

stpaulmercantile's picture
stpaulmercantile
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 19 2008
Posts: 87
List of Stuff to Stockpile - Top 100 Things to Disappear

http://www.thepowerhour.com/news/items_disappearfirst.htm
100 Items to Disappear First

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy...target of
thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 - 12 months to become dried, for
home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile
ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice - Beans - Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR
PLASTIC ONLY - note - food grade if for drinking.
14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won't heat a
room.)
15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting
is difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous
without this item)
24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk - Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman's Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes...buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. {"Strike Anywhere" preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go
first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in
Wintertime.)
45. Workboots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, "No. 76 Dietz" Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience;
Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting - if with
wheels)
49. Men's Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail
clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles...Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soysauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soupbase
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. "Survival-in-a-Can"
79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress's
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin wax
96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
97. Chewing gum/candies
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
100. Goats/chickens

From a Sarajevo War Survivor:
Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war - death of parents and
friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper
attacks.

1. Stockpiling helps. but you never no how long trouble will last, so locate
near renewable food sources.
2. Living near a well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.
3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in
war
quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold's.
4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity - it's the easiest
to
do without (unless you're in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without
heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy - it makes a
lot of
the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only
needs
enough heat to "warm", not to cook. It's cheap too, especially if you buy it
in
bulk.
6. Bring some books - escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more
valuable as the war continues. Sure, it's great to have a lot of survival
guides, but you'll figure most of that out on your own anyway - trust me,
you'll
have a lot of time on your hands.
7. The feeling that you're human can fade pretty fast. I can't tell you how
many
people I knew who would have traded a much needed meal for just a little bit
of
toothpaste, rouge, soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have
to
lose your humanity. These things are morale-builders like nothing else.
8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

Aahhh.....  Arkansas.....  I should've guessed!

Mike 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

stpaulmercantile, I find your post simply unbelievable...  so much of this stuff is simply unsustainable, and requires so much storage space.  I'm prepared for much of the bullshit ahead, but I am absolutely not doing many if not most of the things you suggest here.

Your list is so long I don't know where to start, and I certainly can't tackle much of it in a response, so I'll pick the eyes out of what I consider glaring errors.

Generators.  Just how much fuel can you store before the whole thing becomes useless?  What about parts post TSHTF?  A friend of mine who has headed for the hills has already spent quite a lot of time and money fixing generators and pumps and endured the frustrations of being sent the wrong parts, removing his equipment from service for at times WEEKS...  This is not part of The Simpler Way.  If you must have electricity, go solar.  No moving parts.....  which is why I wouldn't recommend wind either, certainly not for a post TSHTF scenario.  As much as I like the elegance of wind turbines.

Portable Toilets.  Why on Earth would you want one of those?  Get a composting one.  No chemicals, low maintenance, and the end result is a bountiful resource...

Honey.  Grow your own.  Honey doesn't keep well.  Hoarding stuff, BTW, only makes you self sufficient until the stuff runs out.  Not even canned food lasts forever.  I recently threw out a can of saurkraut that went off....

Vegetable Oil.  Ditto.  Short life.  We grow olives and nuts so we can eventually make our own oil.

Milk.  You must be kidding...  you have ten acres and you don't own a cow or some goats?

Water Containers.  Why?  Sure they're handy, but plastic has very limited life.  We have two containers here, they're 5,500 gallons a pop steel tanks above ground so you can get every last drop out of them in case of no pump.  Full (right now!) to the brim with crystal clear water captured off our roof....

Aluminium foil.  Personally, I'd have that stuff banned.  Hugely wasteful use of an amazing resource that requires tons of fossil fuels to get.  Single use anything is BAD! 

Laundry detergent.  If you were washing in super soft rain water (like us), you'd realise you don't need detergents (all made with oil) that once used  get dumped on your precious soil to poison it...

I could go on, but I won't, I have better things to do.  Most of this list is merely pre-apocalypse consumerism.  This coming shitstorm is permanent, and once the stuff on your list runs out, you won't be able to replace it or fix it.

My attitude is if you can't make it yourself or fix it with a bit of fencing wire, it will have limited use.  Just my two cents' worth..

Mike 

ceci1ia's picture
ceci1ia
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 79
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

I believe stpaul quoted a list from another site. it's not his list
but something he found that's very interesting. I believe the post is
merely listing the first 100 things that disappeared in a war
situation. It's not telling you to get these things; just making an
observation that these things disappeared first in a certain kind of
situation.

Actually, I live in a cabin in the woods and favor the
simple life. When things break down, no one will come to help, or it's
very hard to convince them to do it. (Even though they're getting
paid.) So I prefer the non-mechanical solution. That said, we have a
hydroturbine to make electricity, and use gas-powered vehicles to get
up and down the mountain.

I agree, aluminum foil is like solid
electricity, there's so much power that goes into making it. I would be
more into stockpiling cigarettes or toilet paper for bartering.

My
favorite gadget in the summer is the solar oven. That is an awesome
tool. I highly recommend them. My other favorite buy this past year:
gravity fed water filter with ceramic and silver filters. Our water
source is groundwater, so this makes it drinkable. I love it.

I grew up in Arkansas; now live in California. Arkansas is beautiful and I miss it.

machinehead's picture
machinehead
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2008
Posts: 1077
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

In a post-apocalypse science fiction novel I read [can't remember
the author or title now], a guy named Brown had figured out the
ultimate scarce commodity -- beauty products. Yes, he dealt in
stockings, negligee, perfume, lipstick, mascara, eyeliner, make-up base
-- all the manufactured luxuries which quickly became unavailable, but
for which demand never flags. Plus his many and varied customers gave
him an unrivaled intelligence network in the community.

Long-term,
I doubt that I'm going to hang around the U.S., with its high cost of
living, huge energy deficit, and extremely intrusive, predatory
government. But if I were, I'd sure head back to the Arkansas Ozarks.
The soil quality isn't too great, but nearly everything else is.

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

stpaulmercantile, I find your post simply unbelievable...  so much of this stuff is simply unsustainable, and requires so much storage space.  I'm prepared for much of the bullshit ahead, but I am absolutely not doing many if not most of the things you suggest here.

Your list is so long I don't know where to start, and I certainly can't tackle much of it in a response, so I'll pick the eyes out of what I consider glaring errors.

Generators.  Just how much fuel can you store before the whole thing becomes useless?  What about parts post TSHTF?  A friend of mine who has headed for the hills has already spent quite a lot of time and money fixing generators and pumps and endured the frustrations of being sent the wrong parts, removing his equipment from service for at times WEEKS...  This is not part of The Simpler Way.  If you must have electricity, go solar.  No moving parts.....  which is why I wouldn't recommend wind either, certainly not for a post TSHTF scenario.  As much as I like the elegance of wind turbines.

Portable Toilets.  Why on Earth would you want one of those?  Get a composting one.  No chemicals, low maintenance, and the end result is a bountiful resource...

Honey.  Grow your own.  Honey doesn't keep well.  Hoarding stuff, BTW, only makes you self sufficient until the stuff runs out.  Not even canned food lasts forever.  I recently threw out a can of saurkraut that went off....

Vegetable Oil.  Ditto.  Short life.  We grow olives and nuts so we can eventually make our own oil.

Milk.  You must be kidding...  you have ten acres and you don't own a cow or some goats?

Water Containers.  Why?  Sure they're handy, but plastic has very limited life.  We have two containers here, they're 5,500 gallons a pop steel tanks above ground so you can get every last drop out of them in case of no pump.  Full (right now!) to the brim with crystal clear water captured off our roof....

Aluminium foil.  Personally, I'd have that stuff banned.  Hugely wasteful use of an amazing resource that requires tons of fossil fuels to get.  Single use anything is BAD! 

Laundry detergent.  If you were washing in super soft rain water (like us), you'd realise you don't need detergents (all made with oil) that once used  get dumped on your precious soil to poison it...

I could go on, but I won't, I have better things to do.  Most of this list is merely pre-apocalypse consumerism.  This coming shitstorm is permanent, and once the stuff on your list runs out, you won't be able to replace it or fix it.

My attitude is if you can't make it yourself or fix it with a bit of fencing wire, it will have limited use.  Just my two cents' worth..

Mike 

joe2baba's picture
joe2baba
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2008
Posts: 807
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

hey machinehead

come on down i personally would love to have you and we are going to secede so you wont have to leave the u.s to leave the u.s.

as for the soil i have great soil ...sandy loam and can grow anything. bottomland is the place to be, nice rich soil and lots of water shhhhh dont tell anyone. the city slickers buy the mountain tops so they can have the view. well the view they will have is me growing my food and drinking nice cool clear water.

another advantage is we are loaded up on iron and ammo and not afraid to use em . we also have a fair number af anarcho libertarians. hell in the old days we had all the outlaws here from frank and jesse to pretty boy floyd and bonnie and clyde.

down in fort smith we had the hangin judge parker. see my other post on this thread. i will personally introduce you to ol arly he will take good care of you you betcha .

so bro ya got a home any ol time

joe

joe2baba's picture
joe2baba
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2008
Posts: 807
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

come on home girl woooooo pig sooooie

i live  just south of fayetteville. california is gonna fall off of anything it sits on.

joe

nickbert's picture
nickbert
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 14 2009
Posts: 1207
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...
Damnthematrix wrote:

stpaulmercantile, I find your post simply unbelievable...  so much of this stuff is simply unsustainable, and requires so much storage space.  I'm prepared for much of the bullshit ahead, but I am absolutely not doing many if not most of the things you suggest here.

Your list is so long I don't know where to start, and I certainly can't tackle much of it in a response, so I'll pick the eyes out of what I consider glaring errors.

Generators.  Just how much fuel can you store before the whole thing becomes useless?  What about parts post TSHTF?  A friend of mine who has headed for the hills has already spent quite a lot of time and money fixing generators and pumps and endured the frustrations of being sent the wrong parts, removing his equipment from service for at times WEEKS...  This is not part of The Simpler Way.  If you must have electricity, go solar.  No moving parts.....  which is why I wouldn't recommend wind either, certainly not for a post TSHTF scenario.  As much as I like the elegance of wind turbines.

Portable Toilets.  Why on Earth would you want one of those?  Get a composting one.  No chemicals, low maintenance, and the end result is a bountiful resource...

Honey.  Grow your own.  Honey doesn't keep well.  Hoarding stuff, BTW, only makes you self sufficient until the stuff runs out.  Not even canned food lasts forever.  I recently threw out a can of saurkraut that went off....

Vegetable Oil.  Ditto.  Short life.  We grow olives and nuts so we can eventually make our own oil.

Milk.  You must be kidding...  you have ten acres and you don't own a cow or some goats?

Water Containers.  Why?  Sure they're handy, but plastic has very limited life.  We have two containers here, they're 5,500 gallons a pop steel tanks above ground so you can get every last drop out of them in case of no pump.  Full (right now!) to the brim with crystal clear water captured off our roof....

Aluminium foil.  Personally, I'd have that stuff banned.  Hugely wasteful use of an amazing resource that requires tons of fossil fuels to get.  Single use anything is BAD! 

Laundry detergent.  If you were washing in super soft rain water (like us), you'd realise you don't need detergents (all made with oil) that once used  get dumped on your precious soil to poison it...

I could go on, but I won't, I have better things to do.  Most of this list is merely pre-apocalypse consumerism.  This coming shitstorm is permanent, and once the stuff on your list runs out, you won't be able to replace it or fix it.

My attitude is if you can't make it yourself or fix it with a bit of fencing wire, it will have limited use.  Just my two cents' worth..

Mike 

I have to back ceci1ia on this one... I've seen this list before a long time ago somewhere else, so I think it's a reasonable assumption stpaul was passing it along as an interesting read to share.  He may not necessarily be ENDORSING these things.  I do agree with your criticism of some items on the list; some of those things are not good term long term solutions.  But these are after all things that a large number of people are likely to buy out first in emergencies, which implies focus on a short term emergencies as well as a lack of previous preparation or planning.  And sometimes, some of us just don't have the option to use the 'best method' and have to use a less optimal or sustainable option.  For example I use 5 gallon plastic water containers for water storage, not because it's the best way to do it, but because that's all my current living situation allows....

- Nickbert

 

 

sunson's picture
sunson
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 29 2009
Posts: 42
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

I believe, given a few basic skills and a good terrain to get the raw materials, a lot of the things in the list can be made by hand. Secondly, I believe, we'll have enough useless things lying around when energy is on the decline and I'm damn confident we'll put them to very creative uses.

So... I'd just say spend time on acquiring skills than material.

0. Growing food - be it vegetables or animals.

1. Carpentry.

2. Smithy and Foundry  - out here in India, its amazing how people reuse stuff. I've seen expensive machinery from closed down factories being cast to make a lot of vessels right in front of my eyes!

3. Some basic electricals / electronics skills. Automation still has a lot of pay off - low energy devices will have a role to play.

I'm doing 0 and 3 right now and stocking up on what-seems-to-be durable tools for these (from cast-iron spades, plows, etc., to rugged soldering irons and electronics components).

... last but not the least, invest in building a well. I just setup a home with a nice well. Right now there is a submersible motor pump that pulls water to an overhead tank, but I've also fixed a pulley + rope + bucket to fetch water manually. See http://www.overthehorizon.net/images/oma-102.jpg

Medicinal applications - this will be a big opportunity and I'm completely with arly on this one: I've been telling my wife that we should grow some 'cash crops' (marijuana, etc.,). Its not that difficult in India anyway to grow marijuana... India has the right climate (no need to build green houses, it just grows on the streets in some places!) and we have a super traditional history of marijuana use for medicinal, recreational and 'spiritual' purposes. To use a 'free market believer's phrase in this context: "When things become unviable, there will be alternatives" and I think these drugs will be great alternative 'medicines'.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/haberlah/63936120/in/photostream/ - look at those large balls of edible, cooked marijuana! ;)

 

stpaulmercantile's picture
stpaulmercantile
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 19 2008
Posts: 87
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

Yes, it's just a list somebody passed along to me, and I agree with most of the criticisms. 

Regarding storing fuel, kerosene can be stored 10-20 years and still be good for use in heaters and cook stoves.  I'll be dead in 20 years, so I do plan on storing kerosene or a similar fuel.  And don't forget that fuel doesn't just disappear after peak oil, it just gets much more scarce and expensive. 

Generators are great for bartering.  Don't forget that the transition period will likely be several decades, so everything on that list will be good for trade.

I think I'll go buy 100 rolls of aluminum foil, just so Damnthematrix can worry about the planet. 

And I don't store water because I have a spring, a big roof with downspouts and barrels, bacteria-removing water filters, etc.

Got milk?  Get a goat.  My doctor raises goats and about 5 of my 10 acres is mostly fenced, so I've got room for goats once I fix the fence.

 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

stpaulmercantile, I find your post simply unbelievable...  so much of this stuff is simply unsustainable, and requires so much storage space.  I'm prepared for much of the bullshit ahead, but I am absolutely not doing many if not most of the things you suggest here.

Your list is so long I don't know where to start, and I certainly can't tackle much of it in a response, so I'll pick the eyes out of what I consider glaring errors.

Generators.  Just how much fuel can you store before the whole thing becomes useless?  What about parts post TSHTF?  A friend of mine who has headed for the hills has already spent quite a lot of time and money fixing generators and pumps and endured the frustrations of being sent the wrong parts, removing his equipment from service for at times WEEKS...  This is not part of The Simpler Way.  If you must have electricity, go solar.  No moving parts.....  which is why I wouldn't recommend wind either, certainly not for a post TSHTF scenario.  As much as I like the elegance of wind turbines.

Portable Toilets.  Why on Earth would you want one of those?  Get a composting one.  No chemicals, low maintenance, and the end result is a bountiful resource...

Honey.  Grow your own.  Honey doesn't keep well.  Hoarding stuff, BTW, only makes you self sufficient until the stuff runs out.  Not even canned food lasts forever.  I recently threw out a can of saurkraut that went off....

Vegetable Oil.  Ditto.  Short life.  We grow olives and nuts so we can eventually make our own oil.

Milk.  You must be kidding...  you have ten acres and you don't own a cow or some goats?

Water Containers.  Why?  Sure they're handy, but plastic has very limited life.  We have two containers here, they're 5,500 gallons a pop steel tanks above ground so you can get every last drop out of them in case of no pump.  Full (right now!) to the brim with crystal clear water captured off our roof....

Aluminium foil.  Personally, I'd have that stuff banned.  Hugely wasteful use of an amazing resource that requires tons of fossil fuels to get.  Single use anything is BAD! 

Laundry detergent.  If you were washing in super soft rain water (like us), you'd realise you don't need detergents (all made with oil) that once used  get dumped on your precious soil to poison it...

I could go on, but I won't, I have better things to do.  Most of this list is merely pre-apocalypse consumerism.  This coming shitstorm is permanent, and once the stuff on your list runs out, you won't be able to replace it or fix it.

My attitude is if you can't make it yourself or fix it with a bit of fencing wire, it will have limited use.  Just my two cents' worth..

Mike 

ceci1ia's picture
ceci1ia
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 79
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

hm, repeating posts. What does that mean?

Joe, you just said
the secret code (W.P.S.), which I have actually traded with other
Arkies when I meet them out here. I was just back in
Clinton/Shirley/Fairfield Bay in December visiting relatives. It's so
beautiful. I must say, though, the effects of meth labs and the people
associated with them were very noticeable. It's a tragedy that has also
had personal effects on my family. Meth is everywhere, especially
California. I'm not putting down Arkansas.

Concerning the list
above, I have to say I have many of those items already. But not nearly
enough aluminum foil. OK, that's a joke.

sunson, you are so right
about water. It is the first need and you're doing the right thing to
get that handled. That's why I think gold will not prove to be the real
measure of wealth. Basics like water and food and shelter will be the
measure of true wealth.

Re. cooking oil: I bought a 5-gallon
bucket of coconut oil. It has a long shelf life and is very healthful.
Not only for cooking but also on rough skin and also added to fruit
smoothies. I swear by coconut oil.

Linda K's picture
Linda K
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 23 2008
Posts: 56
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

"Glaring errors" in what will be of value will differ depending on context, timing, and beliefs. For a great explanation of the context factor check out the Dmitri Orlov lecture posted here:
http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/social-collapse-best-practices/13277

Or Amanda's post here:
http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/lessons-learned-power-outage/12808

Two posts with experiences at their heart. What worked, what didn't, and why. Given that the future isn't predictable by anyone and there will be many roads to getting there, I'm adding a couple free items to the list: listening and being flexable.

Hey Joe2 - glad to hear you've got some good river bottom for your crops. I'm originally from Kansas and my partner's from Illinois so we both know how beautiful it is in your neck of the woods. Have had some great outdoor time there - and some great consumable.

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 4 2009
Posts: 2606
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

stpaul -

Rather than shoot holes in your list I'll just say thanks for providing the link and the info.  I'll take from it what I think will help my family and friends the most and just not worry about the rest.  Yet.

 

 

davidm's picture
davidm
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 23
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...
ceci1ia wrote:

 

My favorite gadget in the summer is the solar oven. That is an awesome tool. I highly recommend them. My other favorite buy this past year: gravity fed water filter with ceramic and silver filters. Our water source is groundwater, so this makes it drinkable. I love it.

Hi Ceci1ia,

Can you tell us the make of the solar over and the filter. Both sound good. I take it the filter is cleaned by hand without need for replacements?

Thanks! David

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2367
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

Mike,

Honey doesn't keep well?
Really?
Cause I ate some my great grandma sealed in the 70's a few months back. It was delicious.

I've heard people say this before, but I've never really heard any proof to back it up. Not that it really contests and of your other points, but I'm mystified about this.

Cheers,

Aaron

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

I was wondering this as well, I've had quite a few friends who were apiarists who swore by the fact that you could bottle honey, cap it and it would keep virtually indefinitely without any other needs (additives, preservatives, or heating). I've had stuff in the 90's that dated back to some great summer in the 50's that the UK had, and it tasted fine to me, that bee keeper kept his honey's like vintage wines, blending some keeping others vintage (no blending), he had a wall going back at that time about 50 years, they all looked pretty good too.

Aluminum foil, as disposible "cookware" is wasteful, but carrying a large roll of it for emergency blankets works well (or you can put it on the wall behind heater, to reflect more heat into the room), you can always clean it carefully too if needed. It also can be used for makeshift wiring or fuses in a pinch (not that I'd recommend it for "mains" voltages). It also is useful for makeshift scissor sharpening, You can use it as a reflector in a solar oven (you need a box too), as a makeshift antenna, and finally, what else would I wear if not my Aluminum foil hat, you know the damn government mind control, and aliens might finally force me to conform...

 

EndGamePlayer's picture
EndGamePlayer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 2 2008
Posts: 546
good list St Paul M

Good list and as I print it out I'll check out your store again.

Some things we will supstitute are the composters since we're switching out the sun-mars for methane digesters so we have some free fuel. Guess 1 cow can make enough gas to run a modified car a couple trips to town a month, or a generator, or gas lights, or . . .

Thanks for the list . . EGP

 

ckessel's picture
ckessel
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Online)
Joined: Nov 12 2008
Posts: 465
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...
davidm wrote:
ceci1ia wrote:

 

My favorite gadget in the summer is the solar oven. That is an awesome tool. I highly recommend them. My other favorite buy this past year: gravity fed water filter with ceramic and silver filters. Our water source is groundwater, so this makes it drinkable. I love it.

Hi Ceci1ia,

Can you tell us the make of the solar over and the filter. Both sound good. I take it the filter is cleaned by hand without need for replacements?

Thanks! David

David,

I just ordered the water filter from stpaulmercantile. He has a good website with many survival tools and he also sends a percentage of what he earns to Chris M if you are referenced from this site.

You can also make a lot of things yourself. The book, "The Basics of Permaculture Design" by Ross Mars shows a solar oven and a solar food dryer for example. There are many other sources as well for the do-it-yourself ers out there.

Coop

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 14 2008
Posts: 1258
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

  Where  have you found the best place to get coconut oil by the 5 gallon bucket ?   I have been getting it at walmart 1 quart at a time  : (

Diana

Juvysen's picture
Juvysen
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 30 2008
Posts: 121
Re: Interesting Article on what some people are doing to ...

my impression is that honey lasts forever.

http://www.benefits-of-honey.com/honey-facts.html

Quote:

It was reported that archaeologists found 2000 year old jars of honey in Egyptian tombs and they still tasted delicious! So, real honey facts -- there is no expiration date for honey, it is a miracle food; it never goes bad! Many people find it rather surprising that bacteria cannot grow in honey because all things being equal, bacteria loves sugar. The unique chemical composition of low water content and relatively high acidic level in honey creates a low pH (3.2-4.5) environment that makes it very unfavourable for bacteria or other micro-organism to grow. "Best Before" dates on honey buckets indicating honey shelf life thus do not seem to be very important after all.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_shelf_life_of_honey

Quote:

Honey stored in sealed containers can remain stable for decades and even centuries! For practical purposes, a shelf-life of two years is often stated. Properly processed, packaged and stored honey retains its quality for a long time. Use the link below for more information.

I thought the only "going bad" that honey does is basically to solidify.  Easily remedied by heat or just scooping it out solid for use.  *shrug*

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments