Inside Job (2010) A Must Watch!

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Vanityfox451's picture
Vanityfox451
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Inside Job (2010) A Must Watch!

You had best be quick, because I figure You Tube will take this film down within a day ...

Wikipedia Review

Inside Job is a 2010 documentary film about the financial crisis of 2007-2010 directed by Charles H. Ferguson. The film was screened at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2010. The film won an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 2011.

Ferguson has described the film as being about "the systemic corruption of the United States by the financial services industry and the consequences of that systemic corruption."In five parts the film explores how changes in the policy environment and banking practices helped create the 2008 financial crisis. Inside Job was well received by film critics who praised its pacing, research and explanation of complex material.

~ VF ~

ewilkerson's picture
ewilkerson
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My God.  That is

My God.  That is sickening.  Just think how well off they will be when the whole economy collapses.  They'll be ready.

Vanityfox451's picture
Vanityfox451
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Inside Job (film) Matt Damon Narrates

Ewilkerson,

The mind boggles doesn't it!!! I mean, how many trillions of dollars were literally wiped off the planet, I heard a figure amounting to $10 trillion at the time???

How many home foreclosures? Millions!

how many children died because their families couldn't afford hospital bills? Untold!

How many suicides? Untold!

How much suffering? Unimaginable!

Where's the outrage???? Misdirected!!!!!

It's just disgusting!!!!!!!!!!

More than stultifying though - that there have only been 127 hits on this thread to date, and its been up for an entire day. Where in the hell is the commentary??????????

~ VF ~

sundarb's picture
sundarb
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Where is the empathy?

Vanity,

Great find and I really hope people take the time to watch this movie. 

I saw a micro-documentary recently that showed how average Americans tend to remain detached from reality.

It is very sad.

"It is no measure of mental health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society" - Krishnamurti

 

Saffron's picture
Saffron
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where is commentary?
Vanityfox451 wrote:

More than stultifying though - that there have only been 127 hits on this thread to date, and its been up for an entire day. Where in the hell is the commentary??????????

~ VF ~

Vanityfox, my guess is most of us need to put watching a nearly 2 hour movie on hold, hoping that it will still be there when we can get to it (at least that is the case for me.) It is difficult for me to even watch the 12 minute clips people post and I always appreciate the summaries when they are included ... such is life for a prepper with kids in the house ... we must catch our updates in snatches.

There is also the sad fact that for most of us here, this is old news ... as I know it is for you too. The outrage is that there are not more mainstream people waking up now that there is a movie to tell us about it. I wrote the following in October of 2008 and it was printed (edited for space) in our local paper. There were a few nice comments ... all in agreement ... but it did not create the torrent of outraged discussion that I thought (and hoped) it might. It was my wake up call to just how complacent people have become and in the year and a half since, despite things moving downhill, I see people are still more willing to believe a MSM that claims things are looking up, than to take stock of reality and consider we are in deep trouble.

 

Where is Honor?

It was the article about the death row inmate that put me over the edge. The inmate was asking for clemency because he was too fat to be put to death in a humane manner. Prison food reputation notwithstanding, he’d packed on enough pounds that there was fear there would need to be excessive poking for an elusive vein on his chubby forearms, leading to what constitutes “cruel and unusual punishment,” which of course nice folks like us wouldn’t wish upon the callous torturer, rapist and killer of two young women.

So our tax dollars are being used to mount a defense on this man’s behalf. This, after footing the bill for the past 21 years of his life while he gorged himself on death row and planned escapes (one attempted in 2005) instead of using that time to repent (he has neither apologized nor shown remorse for his deed.)

 

Why rant about one of perhaps a thousand such injustices that occur daily, but which we are supposed to ignore because, after all, we have systems in place and of course, we want everyone treated fairly? Because it is symbolic of an imbalance that is inherent in America today. A lack of discernment of what is truly right vs wrong, good vs evil. A lack of the ability to go within and decide something from a moral point of view versus what the law allows. A lack of Honor.

Consider this: a Wall Street executive, asked if he felt any guilt for his part in the economic breakdown answers with a flip, “I’m not to blame. There were no laws against what I was doing.”

 

My jaw drops at that and has a hard time closing around words that are suitable to print.

Because laws were not in place specifically preventing blatant greed and irresponsibility, corporations are failing left and right, leaving small-time investors with nothing in their retirement accounts while the top officers of those corporations retire to million dollar estates, secure in the knowledge that corporate laws keep them from being personally financially liable, even if they were to be criminally convicted (an unlikely occurrence as it appears there are fewer lawyers motivated to defend innocent small investors than there are willing to go to bat for convicted killers.)

A lack of a precise law to prevent banks from stupidly loaning to persons without the financial means to repay and another law preventing ill-funded people from accepting said loans has brought the country to its knees in a manner that hasn’t been seen since 1929 (yes, the Great Depression to save you the trip to Wikipedia.)

Because laws are not in place, as we fall faster and faster into some sort of economic abyss, the powers that be are determined to drag your average fiscally responsible American right along into the hole, since apparently a country that fails together (financially that is) stays together.

In truth, it was not from a lack of laws that the above occurred. It was from a lack of Honor. A refusal to stick to the high road because, after all, everyone’s doing it and I want my piece of the pie. Thus the greed of some results in hardship and despair for the rest.

Just how are “the rest” supposed to act at a time like this? Certainly, as the civilized people of a constitutional republic, we are expected to do nothing more than tap off a letter to our congressman? Anything else would be unbecoming, not to mention a bother. Besides, we wouldn’t dare meet and raise our voices since that is the realm of those “fringe people” who have recently made news.

No, we should quietly sit back, content that in keeping up with the news and complaining to a neighbor, we have done all we can be reasonably expected to do.

Unless we wish to consider what Founding Father, John Adams had to say:

“We have no government armed in power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion.

Our Constitution was made only for a religious and moral people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”

 

Our Constitution, the supreme law of our land, did not fail us by not having precise laws built into it that would have prevented this financial disaster. It was simply not written for an immoral and dishonorable people, which it appears many of our most powerful and influential have become. If you are squirming because you’re beginning to get the picture that you, yes, you, may need to become involved and stand in this fight against moral decay and corruption, then congratulations - you appear to still have Honor.

 

 

I continue to find it despairing that things are moving from disgraceful to unbelievable ... note the article I posted in Outrage! about BP owners receiving bonuses and calling this their best year ever ... sorry don't know how to link it. But I'm beginning to lose hope that there is enough honor to do anything about it all. Certainly there isn't enough outrage. 

 

~ s

edited for formatting

 

land2341's picture
land2341
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sign of hope?

I just found out that Vanguard is obliging all of its employees (crew members) to watch this movie.......  Interesting move from an investment firm.  

Interesting move from the author of "Enough."

ao's picture
ao
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the best if yet to come
Vanityfox451 wrote:

More than stultifying though - that there have only been 127 hits on this thread to date, and its been up for an entire day. Where in the hell is the commentary??????????

~ VF ~

VF,

Thanks for posting this film.  As Saffron has pointed out, however, the reality is that the subject matter contained therein is old news.  Anyone who closely follows the financial markets was aware of these issues prior to the documentary being released.  The sad truth is that the majority of people will probably not watch this film due to a variety of reasons, ranging from time constraints to apathy to ignorance to downright stupidity.  The sadder truth though is that the majority appears to lack the courage to do what should be done but what can't be discussed here.  In more honorable times, justice for these perpetrators would be swift, severe, and irreversible.  Unfortunately, due to the absence of any significant consequences, the actions of these perpetrators will become progressively more egregious until the day of reckoning arrives and justice is finally meted out.      

SteveW's picture
SteveW
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Posts: 490
Meltdown

I watched "Inside Job" last night and maybe I'm getting jaded with watching recent history but I found the CBC documentary "Meltdown" to be a much better production. It was shown last February and the entire 3 episodes (135 minutes) are still available for online viewing.

http://www.cbc.ca/doczone/meltdown/

Ken C's picture
Ken C
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Joined: Feb 13 2009
Posts: 753
Just finished watching Inside Job

I just finished watching the movie. I bought the DVD from Amazon. I thought that it was extremely well done.

The financial - criminal activity goes back decades and still no one is prosecuted, disgusting and pathetic.

Now to get my wife to watch it so maybe she will get on board.. One step at a time.

 

Ken

 

Travlin's picture
Travlin
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Posts: 1322
Saffron wrote: I wrote the
Saffron wrote:

I wrote the following in October of 2008 and it was printed (edited for space) in our local paper. There were a few nice comments ... all in agreement ... but it did not create the torrent of outraged discussion that I thought (and hoped) it might. It was my wake up call to just how complacent people have become and in the year and a half since, despite things moving downhill, I see people are still more willing to believe a MSM that claims things are looking up, than to take stock of reality and consider we are in deep trouble.

Where is Honor?

It was the article about the death row inmate that put me over the edge. The inmate was asking for clemency because he was too fat to be put to death in a humane manner. Prison food reputation notwithstanding, he’d packed on enough pounds that there was fear there would need to be excessive poking for an elusive vein on his chubby forearms, leading to what constitutes “cruel and unusual punishment,” which of course nice folks like us wouldn’t wish upon the callous torturer, rapist and killer of two young women.

So our tax dollars are being used to mount a defense on this man’s behalf. This, after footing the bill for the past 21 years of his life while he gorged himself on death row and planned escapes (one attempted in 2005) instead of using that time to repent (he has neither apologized nor shown remorse for his deed.)

 

Why rant about one of perhaps a thousand such injustices that occur daily, but which we are supposed to ignore because, after all, we have systems in place and of course, we want everyone treated fairly? Because it is symbolic of an imbalance that is inherent in America today. A lack of discernment of what is truly right vs wrong, good vs evil. A lack of the ability to go within and decide something from a moral point of view versus what the law allows. A lack of Honor.

Consider this: a Wall Street executive, asked if he felt any guilt for his part in the economic breakdown answers with a flip, “I’m not to blame. There were no laws against what I was doing.”

 

My jaw drops at that and has a hard time closing around words that are suitable to print.

Because laws were not in place specifically preventing blatant greed and irresponsibility, corporations are failing left and right, leaving small-time investors with nothing in their retirement accounts while the top officers of those corporations retire to million dollar estates, secure in the knowledge that corporate laws keep them from being personally financially liable, even if they were to be criminally convicted (an unlikely occurrence as it appears there are fewer lawyers motivated to defend innocent small investors than there are willing to go to bat for convicted killers.)

A lack of a precise law to prevent banks from stupidly loaning to persons without the financial means to repay and another law preventing ill-funded people from accepting said loans has brought the country to its knees in a manner that hasn’t been seen since 1929 (yes, the Great Depression to save you the trip to Wikipedia.)

Because laws are not in place, as we fall faster and faster into some sort of economic abyss, the powers that be are determined to drag your average fiscally responsible American right along into the hole, since apparently a country that fails together (financially that is) stays together.

In truth, it was not from a lack of laws that the above occurred. It was from a lack of Honor. A refusal to stick to the high road because, after all, everyone’s doing it and I want my piece of the pie. Thus the greed of some results in hardship and despair for the rest.

Just how are “the rest” supposed to act at a time like this? Certainly, as the civilized people of a constitutional republic, we are expected to do nothing more than tap off a letter to our congressman? Anything else would be unbecoming, not to mention a bother. Besides, we wouldn’t dare meet and raise our voices since that is the realm of those “fringe people” who have recently made news.

No, we should quietly sit back, content that in keeping up with the news and complaining to a neighbor, we have done all we can be reasonably expected to do.

Unless we wish to consider what Founding Father, John Adams had to say:

“We have no government armed in power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion.

Our Constitution was made only for a religious and moral people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”

 

Our Constitution, the supreme law of our land, did not fail us by not having precise laws built into it that would have prevented this financial disaster. It was simply not written for an immoral and dishonorable people, which it appears many of our most powerful and influential have become. If you are squirming because you’re beginning to get the picture that you, yes, you, may need to become involved and stand in this fight against moral decay and corruption, then congratulations - you appear to still have Honor.

 

 

I continue to find it despairing that things are moving from disgraceful to unbelievable ... note the article I posted in Outrage! about BP owners receiving bonuses and calling this their best year ever ... sorry don't know how to link it. But I'm beginning to lose hope that there is enough honor to do anything about it all. Certainly there isn't enough outrage. 

Saffron

That was a powerful piece you wrote.  I think you nicely identified the root of the problem.  Your final thoughts in the added remarks mesh with my conclusions too.  It too bad we have come to this, but as a people we have brought it upon ourselves.

Travlin 

 

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