ID cards - a world view

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investorzzo's picture
investorzzo
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ID cards - a world view

A very indepth article on world wide id cards

http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14992

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Re: ID cards - a world view

An excellent overview, Investorzzo . . . Thanks!  Another good reason to develop local sources of commodities . . . business can be conducted without our "behavior" being tracked.

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Tapani
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Re: ID cards - a world view

 

Still, you guys should be happy you are still fighting against ID cards, national ID numbers etc.

In Sweden, where I am from (and same applies to all EU countries) we have all that already -- and more:

* When you are born, you are assigned a personal number - that identifies you through life

* National ID cards sortof exists in the form of police IDs and passports. They both are biometric, you are photographed in a special stance with special lightning to make you easy to identify by computers from surveillance cameras (i.e. lighning emphasizes eye sockets, nose and chin). At least passports have RFID and require fingerprints to get.

Further we have:

* All electronic communication are monitored and probably stored by govt. This includes recordings of phone calls and internet traffic.

* Train and air travel can not be done anonymously. Transportation information is considered public information, and is required to be stored indefinitely.

* Your financial assets and income are registered once per year, for tax purposes. This (sortof leaked) register is available online for a small fee. All financial transactions are also logged, and recently a copy of all bank transactions (inc. CC purchases) were handed out to the US.

* This fall, if an EU mandated law is voted through, cell phone positions will be logged too (everyone has a cell phone here), and phone companies are required to be able to identify each customer.

* Blood/DNA sample is (or was?) taken of all newborns since 1976. These samples are stored without any expiration date.

* Crime investigators can forcefully DNA sample hundreds in mass screenings.

There are discussions about taking this even further in the "Stockholm programme", but the details are secret. One part that is known is to create a central register of everything above for the whole EU.

 

I am considering moving once I finish my studies... but too bad the whole world seems to be going down the same path. Any places better than others?

 

//Tapani

 

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Cloudfire
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I'd rather drink muddy water . . .
Tapani wrote:

 

Still, you guys should be happy you are still fighting against ID cards, national ID numbers etc.

In Sweden, where I am from (and same applies to all EU countries) we have all that already -- and more:

* When you are born, you are assigned a personal number - that identifies you through life

* National ID cards sortof exists in the form of police IDs and passports. They both are biometric, you are photographed in a special stance with special lightning to make you easy to identify by computers from surveillance cameras (i.e. lighning emphasizes eye sockets, nose and chin). At least passports have RFID and require fingerprints to get.

Further we have:

* All electronic communication are monitored and probably stored by govt. This includes recordings of phone calls and internet traffic.

* Train and air travel can not be done anonymously. Transportation information is considered public information, and is required to be stored indefinitely.

* Your financial assets and income are registered once per year, for tax purposes. This (sortof leaked) register is available online for a small fee. All financial transactions are also logged, and recently a copy of all bank transactions (inc. CC purchases) were handed out to the US.

* This fall, if an EU mandated law is voted through, cell phone positions will be logged too (everyone has a cell phone here), and phone companies are required to be able to identify each customer.

* Blood/DNA sample is (or was?) taken of all newborns since 1976. These samples are stored without any expiration date.

* Crime investigators can forcefully DNA sample hundreds in mass screenings.

There are discussions about taking this even further in the "Stockholm programme", but the details are secret. One part that is known is to create a central register of everything above for the whole EU.

 

I am considering moving once I finish my studies... but too bad the whole world seems to be going down the same path. Any places better than others?

 

//Tapani

 

Cry . . . . . That is devastatingly sad, Tapani . . . .  I'd rather drink muddy water and sleep in a hollow log than live under those conditions . . . .

Bill MacGregor's picture
Bill MacGregor
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Re: ID cards - a world view

Hold on, Tapani!

Not all in the EU have that level of pervasive intrusion, just!

We in the UK have more surveillance cameras per head of population than anywhere in the world. Every vehicle can be tracked on all major roads by use of licence recognition cameras. We have a 'National Insurance Number' from age 16 for national insurance contribution tracking (we pay it on earned income from age 16 to 65 and it notionaly pays for our state pension when we get old enough).

Over 800 public bodies have been granted powers under a under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 to authorise themselves to access "communications data", details of when an email or text is sent or received an email, when a phone call is made, and to whom. The government promised these powers would only be used to tackle terrorism and other serious crime but in reality Ripa powers of physical surveillance have been used to spy on people for trivial offenses such as dog-fouling, over-filling their bins or lying about their children's school catchment area.

We don't have ID cards, despite government attempts, although new passports are biometric and electonic (in a suitably equiped airport my presence is automatically registered because my passport has a chip and arial embedded in it).

DNA can only be stored for a 'proper' reason, and there have been a number of cases challenging the police on this.

We are obliged to say what we earn so we can pay the right amount of tax - most of us don't need to as our employers deduct all the tax at source.

This is simplified but, overall, moving to a truly integrated society where no information is private or secure and the government and police have to be trusted to use it only to catch the 'bad people'.

Run for the hills!

Bill

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Tapani
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Re: ID cards - a world view
Bill MacGregor wrote:

Not all in the EU have that level of pervasive intrusion, just!

True, that sentence of mine was erroneous. I ment to say all of EU has many of these as well.

Bill MacGregor wrote:

We in the UK have more surveillance cameras per head of population than anywhere in the world. Every vehicle can be tracked on all major roads by use of licence recognition cameras. We have a 'National Insurance Number' from age 16 for national insurance contribution tracking (we pay it on earned income from age 16 to 65 and it notionaly pays for our state pension when we get old enough).

We have the same sort of car tracking in Sweden, with the pretext about catching speeders. However footage is regularily used by police for surveillance and tracking etc. Fortunately, other kind of surveillance cameras are relatively scarce in Sweden.

I have read that UK has the most cameras as well, but after visiting Taiwan I have my doubts. The difference is that Taiwanese cameras are privately owned, instead of only by authorities. Regardless, it feels as uncomfortable to be filmed (from three angles in multiple spectral bands) while you eat at a restaurant. :-(

Quote:

Over 800 public bodies have been granted powers under a under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 to authorise themselves to access "communications data", details of when an email or text is sent or received an email, when a phone call is made, and to whom. The government promised these powers would only be used to tackle terrorism and other serious crime but in reality Ripa powers of physical surveillance have been used to spy on people for trivial offenses such as dog-fouling, over-filling their bins or lying about their children's school catchment area.

That law stems from an EU directive, and it (afaik) also mandates storing cell phone location. It is (most likely) coming to Sweden in the fall. Currently, the monitoring and recording of communications is done by a pseudo-military organization (FRA). When the current goverment introduced the Swedish monitoring programme, they said that monitoring of traffic was standard practice done by many countries already - but Sweden just was transparent enough to be public about it.

The US and UK has their equivalent monitoring programmes under the code name ECHELON and others.

I read somewhere (I think it was from the Stratfor think tank) that they predict EU, China and India to become surveillance states - since all three are losely held together, and every region (country, province) has significant opposition towards the unions/states.

 

Quote:

Run for the hills!

Bill

But don't forget to vote on your way! There was a party (oddly enough named pirate party) formed in Sweden just to combat the surveillance society (and also to reduce copyright protection times) - and they got 7.1% of the popular vote in the EU elections!

//Tapani

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Bill MacGregor
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Re: ID cards - a world view

Perhaps we should use the weapons of humour and ridicule to fight back. I rather enjoyed the following film. I hope you do too!

Bill

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Re: ID cards - a world view
Bill MacGregor wrote:

Perhaps we should use the weapons of humour and ridicule to fight back. I rather enjoyed the following film. I hope you do too!

Bill

I love it! . . . But, I'm very disturbed, as those officers certainly didn't seem to be doing their duty at all . . . I didn't see any of the officers ask the alien for his ID card . . . For all they knew, he could have been an illegal alien . . . . . .

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Re: ID cards - a world view

In my experience, some developing countries -- while they may have fewer guarantees of liberty on paper -- have more liberty in practice than the so-called advanced countries like Europe and North America. They simply don't have the funding and the technology to implement vast, intrusive surveillance programs. Go to peaceful parts of the developing world if you want to be mostly left alone by the database state.

Simple example -- every medical prescription in the U.S. goes into a national database called NASPER. Insurance companies, of course, have access to it, and will charge higher health and life insurance premiums to those being treated for depression or cancer or heart disease.

By contrast, in most developing countries you can buy prescription meds right over the counter -- no M.D. gatekeeper, no HIPAA forms to sign (disclosure mandated by U.S. federal law, signing away your health privacy), no NASPER database. My wife once had a urinary infection while we were traveling in South America. It took 10 minutes to purchase an antibiotic at a pharmacy, after consulting the pharmacist. I can't even imagine how a visiting foreigner would go about obtaining prescription meds in the U.S. Good luck with that ...

A second example would be the reduction of the War on Drugs in Latin America. Mexican law now permits possession of personal-use quantities of cannabis, cocaine, LSD, amphetamine and heroin. Retreating from the War on Drugs -- a 1970 American invention which is the dark antithesis of the liberties proclaimed in the 1776 U.S. Declaration of Independence -- will take a major bite out of the surveillance state in Mexico, Argentina, and other Latin countries which no longer see the mismanaged United States as an attractive model.

It may seem like a minor point, but there's a qualitative difference between the dirigiste, voyeuristic nanny states of the rich west and a developing world which needs practical, low-cost ways of living, and can't waste its money on pointless intrusive surveillance and prosecution of victimless crimes.

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Re: ID cards - a world view

machine -

Point well made and taken, but.......

It takes more than being able to easily get an antibiotic for a UTI to frame "liberty in practice".  From personal experience and direct observation, while you might be able to walk up to a pharmacy and get some tetracycline - in many of those "developing" countries you need to walk back to your car with your sidearm on display some you don't get rolled.  And you have to take the long way home to shake tails.  But I agree with you to the Ivory Soap level.

And if we wait long enough, once TSHTF, we will likely have been knocked back enough to be considered at least a "recovering" if not "developing" country.

I certainly hope so........it will help solve a lot of our problems.

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Re: ID cards - a world view

OK, so I live in a 'rich' western country, whose elected dictators can spend huge sums for dubious ends, but there is scant consideration of the facts and their implications. I follow the column in the UK Guardian newspaper by Ben Goldacre, which some of you will be familiar with, called 'Bad Science' where he exposes and ridicules those who shun reason when saying what they say or doing what they do. One such post is the following:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/feb/28/surveillance-ben-gol...

In this article Ben succinctly points out that any system that analyses the behaviour of people in order to spot miscreants, through tracking ID cards or watching movements, are not perfect. As such, they will give false positives and false negatives, which means that there is a straight forward effect: the more information your state collects about you and the more it analyses it in the name of fighting crime or terrorism then the higher the likelihood that you are picked up as an undesirable or someone you wouldn’t want to be walking the streets is left to their own devices.

The simple truth is that governments ignore this rational view of the limits of ‘security’, rendering their systems more Orwellian as time goes by.

Regards

Bill

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Tapani
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Re: ID cards - a world view

machinehead,

I agree with you that developing countries are often better than industrialized when it comes to Orwellianisms. However, when looking for countries one have to take safety (from the people), language, job opportunties and possible SHTF scenarios into account. I am still young and healthy, so access to prescription medicines is not an issue for me yet.

One country I have my eyes on is Norway (similar language to Sweden, rich country, can become self sufficient when SHTF, not in EU and thus avoids lots of EUs big-brotherhood). Other alternatives could be Asian countries like Japan or S. Korea maybe (but with a language barrier, and I have my doubts about how they would handle the coming oil shortages).

 //Tapani

 

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Re: ID cards - a world view
Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

From personal experience and direct observation, while you might be able to walk up to a pharmacy and get some tetracycline - in many of those "developing" countries you need to walk back to your car with your sidearm on display some you don't get rolled.  And you have to take the long way home to shake tails.  But I agree with you to the Ivory Soap level.

Yep -- the Third World is just too dangerous to live in. Fred Reed, who's been a big proponent of Mexico, came out and admitted as much in a recent column:

I have a confession to make to my readers. I have been lying about Mexico. Yes. I am a poor sinner and meant no harm, but the devil got into me, and I have done wrong. I have said that Mexico was a pleasant country of agreeable people, and harmless. I have said that children here run and play in the fountains and enjoy the blessed life of the happy young. No, no! It wasn’t true. They die of hunger in the streets. Nay, Haiti must seem a paradise by comparison.

Oh, if I could repent and redeem myself! I know now I have lured many innocent Americans, virgins (well, that may be stretching it), children, people of ripe years and helpless, into this hellhole of disease and corruption, where they have been robbed and killed and left to moulder in unmarked graves, like Ambrose Bierce. I laughed at Americans who asked me whether Mexico had paved roads. Oh, the shame of it! The truth is that Mexico does not. There are no paved roads in Mexico.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/reed/reed164.html

Funny, I remember paved roads in Mexico, even in the 1970s. The photos in Fred's article make me wonder whether he is pulling our leg or something.

 

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Re: Mexican conditions . . .
machinehead wrote:
Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

From personal experience and direct observation, while you might be able to walk up to a pharmacy and get some tetracycline - in many of those "developing" countries you need to walk back to your car with your sidearm on display some you don't get rolled.  And you have to take the long way home to shake tails.  But I agree with you to the Ivory Soap level.

Yep -- the Third World is just too dangerous to live in. Fred Reed, who's been a big proponent of Mexico, came out and admitted as much in a recent column:

I have a confession to make to my readers. I have been lying about Mexico. Yes. I am a poor sinner and meant no harm, but the devil got into me, and I have done wrong. I have said that Mexico was a pleasant country of agreeable people, and harmless. I have said that children here run and play in the fountains and enjoy the blessed life of the happy young. No, no! It wasn’t true. They die of hunger in the streets. Nay, Haiti must seem a paradise by comparison.

Oh, if I could repent and redeem myself! I know now I have lured many innocent Americans, virgins (well, that may be stretching it), children, people of ripe years and helpless, into this hellhole of disease and corruption, where they have been robbed and killed and left to moulder in unmarked graves, like Ambrose Bierce. I laughed at Americans who asked me whether Mexico had paved roads. Oh, the shame of it! The truth is that Mexico does not. There are no paved roads in Mexico.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/reed/reed164.html

Funny, I remember paved roads in Mexico, even in the 1970s. The photos in Fred's article make me wonder whether he is pulling our leg or something.

I think this may be a case of the blind men describing the elephant . . . . I've seen very modern parts of Mexico, and extremely destitute parts of Mexico, just like here, though perhaps within a different range of extremes. 

I do remember being at a critical care conference during which Swan Ganz catheters (Monitoring devices that are threaded through the great vessels and the chambers of the heart) were discussed, and being shocked to hear that Mexican internists were asking how many times the device could be reused.  I later confirmed this protocol with an intensivist who was practicing in Mexico City.  Here in the US, the idea of reusing a plastic tubular device with a tiny lumen that is in contact with blood, and that cannot be autoclaved, would be unthinkable (so far).  So, while broad generalizations may be pretty unsound, there are (or have been) some stark differences . . . .

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Re: ID cards - a world view
investorzzo wrote:

A very indepth article on world wide id cards

http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14992

This video seems to go well with the excellent article posted by investorzzo. http://www.aclu.org/pizza/images/screen.swf

 

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Tapani
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Re: ID cards - a world view

Demonstrations against surveillance societies (many countries):

http://freedomnotfear2009.org/call-for-action/

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