Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

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Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

http://www.prisonplanet.com/iceland-riots-precursor-to-us-civil-unrest.html   Please go to this link to view photos and a Youtube video of this news item also.  (Scroll down once on the link).  Here is the text. 

Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest? Demonstrators call for government to resign in wake of financial collapse

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet.com
Tuesday, November 25, 2008
Riots and protests in Reykjavik calling for the government of Iceland to resign have increased following a financial catastrophe that has wiped out half of the krona’s value and put one third of the population at risk of losing their homes and life savings. Could similar scenes of civil unrest be repeated in the United States as the economy continues to implode?“It was the latest in a series of protests in the capital since October’s banking collapse crippled the island’s economy. At least five people were injured and Hordur Torfason, a well-known singer in Iceland and the main organiser of the protests, said the protests would continue until the government stepped down,” reports the Scotsman.As crowds gathered in the drizzle before the Althing, the Icelandic parliament, on Saturday, Mr Torfason said: “They don’t have our trust and they are no longer legitimate.”Hundreds more gathered in front of a local police station, pelting eggs at the windows, using a bettering ram to force the doors open and demanding the release of a protester.A banner hung from a government building read “Iceland for Sale: $2,100,000,000,” the amount of the loan the country will receive from the IMF.Gudrun Jonsdottir, a 36-year-old office worker, said: “I’ve just had enough of this whole thing. I don’t trust the government, I don’t trust the banks, I don’t trust the political parties, and I don’t trust the IMF.“We had a good country and they ruined it.”These aren’t the actions of unwieldy mobs in third world countries, we’re talking about a country that had one of the highest living standards in Europe and a relatively wealthy and sedate population, the vast majority of whom are now in revolt over mass redundancies and the fast disappearing values of their paychecks and savings.More peaceful protests against the Federal Reserve during the End the Fed events over the weekend were largely ignored by the U.S. corporate media, but the potential for wider chaos exists should the dollar finally cave in to the hyperinflationary bubble that is being created by the ceaseless printing of money to fund the multi-trillion dollar bailout.Those who continue to assert, “It can’t happen here,” only need to look at the scenes in Reykjavik to realize that similar events could unfold across the U.S., where the reaction of militarized riot cops and even the military itself may be a little more heavy handed to say the least.With top Russian analysts predicting the breakup of the U.S. into different parts, allied with people like deadly accurate trends forecaster Gerald Celente warning of food riots and tax rebellions, the scenes in Reykjavik may be amplified in the U.S. should a significant portion of the public wake up to the monumental fraud of the bailout and begin to feel the impact of its consequences as we enter 2009.  

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

There is not a lot of media coverage on what is happening in Iceland.  I heard a rumour that there is a media ban or shut down on what they are reporting out of this country.  People were left stunned when this happened and now they are angry.

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

It looked like -- at least according to what little footage was available -- the public at large was well-represented in the Iceland demonstrations. It wasn't necessarily only anarcho-thug types but people with kids and older folks. To me, that says it all right there.

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

Here is a blog with letters translated from people in Iceland and what they are experiencing and news of what is happening there:

http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
warren_c wrote:

Here is a blog with letters translated from people in Iceland and what they are experiencing and news of what is happening there:

http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

My friend and I were walking in the twilight one night after showing me his garden.  I think I frightened him a bit.  I always give the worst case scenario whenever someone asks me questions about the nature of a future (negative) predicament.  I told him, while we scanned his mothers large, suburban yard, that we might not see this nice picture in the not-too-distant future.  If all hell breaks loose due to the economic collapse and subsequent collapses in food and housing availability, who are the first to go?  Yes... the poor in the non-suburbs.  It is very likely that they will radiate out from the "inner city" into the suburbs.  What else have they got?  I'd be a field day for me, if I was in the heart of a ghetto, to know that the very people who run this country have collapsed.  If the disorder and chaos leaves the "contained inner city ghettos" then who will be the first to be trampled over?-- Yup, the suburbs.  Those fancy gates will do nothing to stop the desparate.  The number in police have been cut in almost every precint.  If there is a collapse it might go like this:

1.  Today's situation

2. It gets a lot worse

3. The poorest lose their jobs first en masse

4. The poorest, usually in the city and usually the most uneducated, will be the first to riot

5. The cities, with their lack of police and cells, will not be enough to create order

6. You thought Katrina was bad

7. Civil War?

8. Rwanda?

9. Will the gov't finally bring in troops?

10.  When they bring in troops will it be before or after the slaughter?

11.  Will the slaughter of "white people" demand the RFID chip?

12.  This is crazy-- Hope it doesn't happen like this, but if we let something as big as this financail crisis to create a domino effect, then it seems as though the freakin' French Revolution is possible.... I just don't know.

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

Thanks for the link, Warren. Fascinating, ominous reading.

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

I had heard a rumor Riverdance was coming to tour the US again. That might cause the civil unrest.

 

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
mainecooncat wrote:

Thanks for the link, Warren. Fascinating, ominous reading.

 

You are welcome. 

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
warren_c wrote:

Here is a blog with letters translated from people in Iceland and what they are experiencing and news of what is happening there:

http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

Thanks for the link Warren,

Reading the blog is very surreal.  And this is with a, more or less, fully functioning world economy going on outside.

It points up the problems when each country's economy is linked to the rest of the world via globalization.  The dependencies that are created are fine - except when you can't depend on them.  Then where is the back up plan?  Globalization hollowed out the local systems so that they don't exist anymore. 

The food distribution system in the Western World is the same way.  Fossil fuel dependent and very little produced locally.  It doesn't have to be this way - but it is.  Shouldn't we be taking steps now to build in a parallel local food distribution system?

All the best,

James

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
warren_c wrote:

Here is a blog with letters translated from people in Iceland and what they are experiencing and news of what is happening there:

http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

I

 Hi Warren,  Thanks for the link.  This is very interesting.  Surprised  

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
mainecooncat wrote:

It looked like -- at least according to what little footage was available -- the public at large was well-represented in the Iceland demonstrations. It wasn't necessarily only anarcho-thug types but people with kids and older folks. To me, that says it all right there.

Hi Mainecooncat, I noticed that too.  These were concerned citizens, regular people demanding justice.  If that was America, riot police in full gear would have beaten them to a pulp, pepper sprayed, gased, tasered them and then thrown them in a cell for more punishment.

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
KKPSTEIN wrote:
mainecooncat wrote:

It looked like -- at least according to what little footage was available -- the public at large was well-represented in the Iceland demonstrations. It wasn't necessarily only anarcho-thug types but people with kids and older folks. To me, that says it all right there.

Hi Mainecooncat, I noticed that too.  These were concerned citizens, regular people demanding justice.  If that was America, riot police in full gear would have beaten them to a pulp, pepper sprayed, gased, tasered them and then thrown them in a cell for more punishment.

 

 

Without a doubt!

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

If anyone is interested in adding me as a friend on MySpace, please visit me at

 www.myspace.com/getpaidtosave

Visit my blog and stop by and say hello!

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

Thanks for the link, Warren.  It does give one a surreal feeling to read it.

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

Y'all are welcome. I am glad I could  be  helpful.

I think there is a lot we can learn from the people of iceland,  argentina etc.. abut how to get through very difficult financial situations and shortages. 

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

I wept as I read the story culminating with a roar from the deepest regions of my heart.

the link http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

recent video about iceland and what they are experiencing:

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
radiance wrote:

I wept as I read the story culminating with a roar from the deepest regions of my heart.

the link http://newsfrettir.com/alive/

 

 Thanks.  It was a very moving story.  Seems so surreal. 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
warren_c wrote:

recent video about iceland and what they are experiencing:

 

Interesting.  400 bars that can entertain 25,000.00 people.  My kind of town ;)  Their country is already changing so much and it has only been since the begining of October that this happened.  It will be like this for N. America as well.  Things will change so fast, people will not have time to adjust, they can only react.  We need to prepare.  Again, thank you! 

 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?
KKPSTEIN wrote:
warren_c wrote:

recent video about iceland and what they are experiencing:

 

Interesting.  400 bars that can entertain 25,000.00 people.  My kind of town ;)  Their country is already changing so much and it has only been since the begining of October that this happened.  It will be like this for N. America as well.  Things will change so fast, people will not have time to adjust, they can only react.  We need to prepare.  Again, thank you! 

 

hahaha! 

You are welcome. Thing is bars are expensive. I would be brewing/ making my own supply of liquor. I think this might be part of the preparation I am going to do. Another thing is our country ( US) is so vast I have a feeling that each part of our country will deal with it in a unique way. In California the unemployment is almost at the same levels as iceland's unemployment rate already. 

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Re: Iceland Riots Precursor To U.S. Civil Unrest?

Another update on the subject:

Icelanders protest economic meltdown

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/12/01/europe/EU-Iceland-Meltdown.php

REYKJAVIK, Iceland: Thousands of Icelanders marked the 90th anniversary of their nation's sovereignty with angry protest Monday, and several hundred stormed the central bank to demand the ouster of bankers they blame for the country's spectacular economic meltdown.

Tiny Iceland has seen its banks and currency collapse in just a few weeks while prices and unemployment soar — leaving a country regarded as a model of Scandinavian prosperity in a state of shock.

"The government played roulette and the whole nation has lost," writer Einar Mar Gudmundsson told a noisy but peaceful anti-government rally of several thousand people in downtown Reykjavik.

After the rally, hundreds of protesters stormed the headquarters of Sedlabanki, Iceland's central bank, demanding the sacking of its chief, David Oddsson.

The demonstrators staged an hour-long standoff with shield-wielding riot police inside the bank's lobby, singing songs and chanting "Out with David" and "Power to the People." The protest ended peacefully when both police and demonstrators agreed to withdraw.

Anti-government protests have been growing larger and angrier since Iceland's three main banks collapsed in October under the weight of huge debts amassed during years of rapid economic growth.

Since then the value of the country's currency, the krona, has plummeted. Icelanders who grew used to buying houses and cars with easily available foreign-currency loans now struggle to repay them. The cost of everyday goods is skyrocketing — furniture retailer Ikea hiked its prices by 25 percent last month.

Iceland has been forced to seek $10 billion in aid from the International Monetary Fund and individual countries.

Prime Minister Geir H. Haarde told The Associated Press on Saturday that Iceland's economy would get even worse next year, with a "severe drop" in GDP and purchasing power and rising unemployment.

Haarde said he does not accept personal responsibility for the crisis. He blames commercial bankers who expanded recklessly in the wake of a mid-1990s stock market boom.

But the protest organizers and many other Icelanders say government oversight of the banks was too weak. They want Haarde's coalition government to resign and hold new elections by next spring. By law, Haarde does not have to call a vote until 2011.

Settled by Vikings more than 1,000 years ago and later colonized by Denmark, Iceland became a self-governing country under the Danish crown on Dec. 1, 1918. The volcanic island gained full independence in 1944.

Throughout the anniversary Monday, Icelanders threw taunts, the occasional egg and acts of political theater at a government many now hold in contempt.

Much of the protest — held on a wind-swept hill overlooked by a statue of Iceland's first Viking settler, Ingolfur Arnarson — had a distinctively Nordic flavor. One protester threw meat and cheese onto the lawn of nearby Government House, encouraging the ravens to come and whisk the government away.

Artist Hildur Margretadottir came to the demonstration holding an artificial horse's head on a stick — her version of an old Norse technique for putting a curse on an enemy.

"I am turning it toward the central bank," she said.

She said Iceland's bankers and politicians "were gambling with our money, and they still are."

Across Icelandic society, political disillusionment runs deep.

Marketing manager Runar Birgisson said he helped vote Haarde's government into power.

"Today, I wouldn't elect any of them," he said. "I wouldn't hire them to clean my toilet."

Associated Press Writer Valur Gunnarsson contributed to this report

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