I need the sources ...

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mintoo2cool's picture
mintoo2cool
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I need the sources ...

the crash course is very nice and so far it is the most unbias look at our money troubles. however, there are a large number of statistics and data in the form of graphs shown in the presentation. i wish to know the sources of the graphs . its my way of verification of the genuiness of the data

thank you.

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Posts: 4235
Re: I need the sources ...

Which statistics/graphs do you want to get the source on? If you can give us the chapter where you saw the info we could probably find the sources a little more quickly. This might  end up being a good thread to post a few of these graphs.

Glad to see that you took the time to go through the Crash Course.

 

  • 1) I'll start off with CPI numbers from The Federal  Reserve Bank of Minneapolis from 1800 until 2010

Now here is a graph of those CPI numbers from this site:

CPI

 

(Scroll to the 4th paragraph from the bottom)

Back in 2008 Richard Fisher said that these unfunded liabilities were $99 trillion. (24th paragraph)

 

Then read this.

 

  • Oil production
  • 4)

Total debt 

  •    Another link on total debt

here.

  •      Compare those numbers to

total debt in 2003.

  • Marc Faber also talks about total debt and has his graph at about 7 1/2 minutes into the video

here.

V's picture
V
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Posts: 849
Re: I need the sources ...

I would suggest you peruse the essential books and articles to be found if you click on the learn tab in the upper nav bar

V

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Erik T.
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Re: I need the sources ...
saxplayer00o1 wrote:

This might  end up being a good thread to post a few of these graphs.

Sax,

I think that having a thread to post all the source data including updates is an outstanding idea.

While I understand the OP's desire, my own is different: I trust the veracity of the CC, but I know all that stuff is out of date now. I know the basics (like national debt), but there's a whole lot of figures quoted in the CC that have gotten much worse since the CC was completed, and having an ongoing thread to keep up to date on the new numbers would be fantastic.

Erik

 

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Re: I need the sources ...

Flow of Funds Accounts—Credit Market Debt Outstanding:

1990 to 2008

 

 

 

 

In billions of dollars (13,769 represents $13,769,000,000,000). As of December 31

. Represents credit market debt owed

 

                                                            1990   1995     2000    2002    2003    2004      2005     2006   2007    2008

Credit market debt. . . . . . . . . . . 13,769 18,475 27,157 31,843 34,622 37,808 41,269 45,325 49,866 52,593

 

 

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Re: I need the sources ...

 

World debt (Interactive chart from "The Economist")

(From this report at "The Economist"):

A special report on debt

Debt

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Re: I need the sources ...

"To develop the clock, Kantrowitz started with a conservative estimate of $665 billion in federal loans outstanding as of June. For private student loans, he used a repayment-trajectory model that he put together in addition to annual new loan volume data. Those calculations yielded $168 billion for private student loans. Combine all this debt and you get the starting estimate of $833 billion. The total increases by $2,853.88 for each second since midnight June 30, he said. The total debt outstanding will be more explosive at the beginning of each semester, when most student loans are disbursed."

 

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Re: I need the sources ...

"Global production of crude probably peaked in 2006, and increasing demand will have to be met from more-difficult-to-extract forms of oil such as tar sands, International Energy Agency Chief Economist Fatih Birol said.

“The age of cheap oil is over,” Birol said at a conference in Madrid today.

Global energy use is set to increase by 36 percent over the next 25 years as developing countries raise the standard of living of their citizens by boosting demand for transport, air- conditioning and electronic goods, the IEA estimates.

China, which is forecast to overtake the U.S. as the world’s biggest user of electricity in 2012, will see its energy use rise by 75 percent, the IEA says.

The depletion of crude reserves may benefit countries such as Canada and Venezuela, which have tar sands that yield oil. Those resources are more expensive to extract and only become economical when the price of oil rises.

The use of oil and coal probably will wane in rich countries as they invest in renewable energies and shift to electric vehicles, Birol said. Even so, China will be the world’s biggest market for clean power, nuclear power and electric cars by 2035. "

 

"CHUCK REED is the Democratic mayor of San Jose, California. You might expect him to be an ally of public-sector workers, a powerful lobby in the Golden State. But last month, at a hearing on pension reform held by the Little Hoover Commission, which monitors the state’s government, Mr Reed lamented his crippling public-pensions bill. “City payments for retirement benefits have tripled over the last ten years even though our workforce has declined dramatically, and we have billions of dollars in unfunded liabilities that the taxpayers must pay,” he said.

Mr Reed estimated that the average cost to his city of employing a police officer or firefighter was $180,000 a year. Not only can such workers retire at 50, but some enjoy annual pension payments greater than their salaries. They are also entitled to cost-of-living increases of 3% a year, health and dental insurance for life and lump-sum payments for unused sick leave that could reach hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Plenty of similar bills are looming in America’s public sector: in municipalities, in the federal government, and especially at state level."

"Mr Rauh calculates that seven states will have exhausted their pension assets by 2020—even if they make a return of 8%, a common assumption that looks wildly optimistic."

pensions

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csweningsen
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Re: I need the sources ...

I find myself surprised that this thread is not completed. Yes I "trust" CC & CM -  but that is hardly the point. My Dad trusts Karl Rove.

What makes the CC of value to me, is the impression that it is essentially an accurate compilation and excellent presentation of good data. But that is for *me.* I want to publicize the course; I want to get it out to my neighbors and local business and government people.  And I feel I really don't have the right to present it, nor do I feel it is appropriate, without access to the references.

There are plenty of competing *theories,* each presented with "trust" - and wildly different data - or worse, inferences. What we need is "transparency" - and that requires the references. That is how we can counter the inferences. Otherwise we are reduced to "He said - she said," and the sttatus of gossips preaching to the choir. My impression is that is not  Chris's aim.

The "updates" is of course a vitally important further step.

And may I add, from a usability standpoint, as well as common courtesy and *standard practice,* they should include the section of the CC they are in reference to.

Hopefully and gratefully,

Christian

 

 

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nparker4764
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hmm.  March 2011 and we

hmm.  March 2011 and we have yet to complete a thread in which the OP asked for sources of all the data presented in the Crash Course videos?

 

In this day and age, surely we realize all information is scrutinized and sources are required to convince those with IQ's above 70. 

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