Homegrown Revolution

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
John99's picture
John99
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 27 2009
Posts: 490
Homegrown Revolution

Remember 'Victory Gardens'?

Using their L.A. urban house lot, a couple grows 6000 pounds of food on a tenth of an acre inside the city.

DrKrbyLuv's picture
DrKrbyLuv
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 1995
Re: Homegrown Revolution

John99,

Rats...when I saw your title I thought the revolution had begun.  But the video is amazing, thanks...

Larry

deggleton's picture
deggleton
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2008
Posts: 250
Re: Homegrown Revolution
John99 wrote:

Remember 'Victory Gardens'?

Using their L.A. urban house lot, a couple grows 6000 pounds of food on a tenth of an acre inside the city.

Look again.  That's no couple.  It's a dad and three adult children with most uncommon (wonderful!) values.

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 14 2008
Posts: 1258
Re: Homegrown Revolution

  I am coming back here for inspiration  everytime I get so frustrated with my garden !    At  104 degrees  the weeds still grow  and it is hard to get motivated to go out and pull them : (

EndGamePlayer's picture
EndGamePlayer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 2 2008
Posts: 546
Re: Homegrown weed Revolution

I hear ya! We did get a part of the garden into Weed-Less Water-Less gardens this year but the row crops - corn & beans have been a real challenge.

I also found a new way to grow my strawberries- Put down a 2' wide plastic (bury the edges)  to kill off everything underneath. Once good & dead- I will scooped out a hole and put in some well composted manure and plant strawberries every foot and mulch heavily.  Next is tilling along the outter edges the width of my tiller (2.5') to let the runners grow into that. I guess I can till that area a couple of times to kill off whatever pops up & till in composted manure. Then its time to mulch with composted grass clippings (over the tilled part) - That's where the runners will grow.. Every few years, when the runner plants stop producing or get too weedy - I can till the outter mulched edges, add more manure and let the runners grow into it again. Always leaving the center main plants planted means a lot less work transplanting berries every 3 - 5 years.

I had been fighting the weeds in my strawberries for years by mowing with a bagger every fall when the weed seeds are present but every year they get weedier & weedier. With this newer method - maybe I only need to weed once every few years. . . I can only hope!

V's picture
V
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 14 2009
Posts: 849
Re: Homegrown Revolution
Full Moon wrote:

  I am coming back here for inspiration  everytime I get so frustrated with my garden !    At  104 degrees  the weeds still grow  and it is hard to get motivated to go out and pull them : (

I will take your weeds if you take my Bermuda grass

V

ljhaines's picture
ljhaines
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 23 2009
Posts: 35
Re: Homegrown Revolution
Full Moon wrote:

  I am coming back here for inspiration  everytime I get so frustrated with my garden !    At  104 degrees  the weeds still grow  and it is hard to get motivated to go out and pull them : (

That's why the video has one dad and  three children.... :-)

ljhaines's picture
ljhaines
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 23 2009
Posts: 35
Re: Homegrown weed Revolution
EndGamePlayer wrote:

I also found a new way to grow my strawberries- Put down a 2' wide plastic (bury the edges)  to kill off everything underneath. Once good & dead- I will scooped out a hole and put in some well composted manure and plant strawberries every foot and mulch heavily.  Next is tilling along the outter edges the width of my tiller (2.5') to let the runners grow into that. I guess I can till that area a couple of times to kill off whatever pops up & till in composted manure. Then its time to mulch with composted grass clippings (over the tilled part) - That's where the runners will grow.. Every few years, when the runner plants stop producing or get too weedy - I can till the outter mulched edges, add more manure and let the runners grow into it again. Always leaving the center main plants planted means a lot less work transplanting berries every 3 - 5 years.

I had been fighting the weeds in my strawberries for years by mowing with a bagger every fall when the weed seeds are present but every year they get weedier & weedier. With this newer method - maybe I only need to weed once every few years. . . I can only hope!

On a recent "Two Beers with Steve" broadcast http://twobeerswithsteve.libsyn.com/ on July 24th, he shows and talked about a wonderful tool for weeding. Sounds like just the ticket for your weeding problem. I suggest you listen and cut down on all that hard work leaving you time for "Two Beers"

EndGamePlayer's picture
EndGamePlayer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 2 2008
Posts: 546
Re: Homegrown weed Revolution

I have one of those - but the Ian Gordon on Kondratiev Winter podcast is certainly worth a listen! I read The Fourth Turning a month ago and he equates the cycle with capitolism. A good listen!

My "easiest" gardens are the Weed-less and Water-Less gardens were we grow the tomatoes, peppers, zuc, cucs, eggplant, cabbage and some specialty plants - giant mongolian subflowers, some plants just for seeds. We have a tiller to do between row-type crops to a point (potatoes, corn, beans, pea pods, carrots, beets) and use that stur-up tool to go between plants. The problem with strawberries is working between the runners (I find this problem with sweet potatoes too) but will try the "mother row" method on the berries.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments