Hoarding - negative connotations

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Hoarding - negative connotations

I've just been reading through some of the CM threads, as well as a few other forums and news sites and something very powerful just struck me...

Hoarding - collecting and storing food and other essentials - is now strongly considered to be a pathological obsessive behavior in humans regardless of the scale or reasoning. I find this particularly concerning because stockpiling and preparations that were routine and commonplace just a few decades ago are now considered "negative". My grandparents would never have had less than 6 months of food stocked up in their larder, and I know my great grandfather never had less than a case of ammunition in the storeroom. He once told me that he always budgeted at least one bullet for every day of the year to ensure he and his family could eat. My Gramps never passed up an opportunity to pick up a box of nails or some other "needful thing" to tuck away in the woodshop.

But if we try to do the same things today we're seen as horrible, obsessive-compulsive hoarders with some sort of mental defect. I'm not talking about the person with 40 cats in a one bedroom apartment, I'm talking about a stocked larder and gun case type of thing.

I recently purchased a year's worth of long-term storage food since we're going to be living out in the middle of nowhere without easy access to a grocery store. When the delivery truck came with our 2000+ lbs of food, the look on my younger neighbors' faces was just short of horrified. My retired neighbors came over and chatted us up, interested in what we'd gotten and how we were going to store and use everything. But the neighbors our age keep giving us weird looks. Our immediate next-door neighbor got a view of our gun collection while we were cleaning everything the other day... they now think we're totally bonkers even though we only have what I would consider a reasonable amount of weapons (one sidearm, shotgun and rifle for each of us with one set of spares). I think they'd have apoplexy if they saw our ammo case (which is nowhere near one round a day for each weapon).

Previous generations knew that there were going to be lean times between flush times and that it was prudent to have enough stores to last a year just in case. But our current generations seem to think that this kind of prudent preparation is perverse. Is it a product of our consumeristic lifestyles and the ethereal promise of plenty that has made us forget what our grandparents knew? How can something that was considered normal and prudent a few short years ago have earned such a negative connation so quickly? Is it just a state of denial? There seems to be a underlying agreement that if we plan for the worst, we will somehow bring it about; but as long as we're living the dream, nothing bad will happen. I have my suspicion that this may partly be a conspiracy to keep us all good little consumers... enslaved to the teat of the masters who control the masses by stripping away our self-sufficience.

SIGH - I guess I'm just frustrated and concerned that simply gathering a year's supply of necessities is put on par with deviant psychological behavior. Jeez - it's not like we're storing enough stuff for 50 people when their's only the two of us. At least I don't have a closet full of designer shoes and clothes or a new car or gadget every month... but, hey, if I did, no one would think that behavior was crazy.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

PlicketyCat.

Think about who gets to decide what is pathological. You'll have your answer then,

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

I am a psychiatrist and see nothing pathological about preparing for emergencies.  Hoarding is more along the lines of the Collier brothers' behavior, keeping years of newspapers and trash and rigging your home to kill intruders (for example) or keeping 200 cats in a 3 bedroom home.  Plickety, I treat hoarders for a living, this is not hoarding.  My parents used to keep several months worth of food at home routinely because they canned their own fruits and had a big freezer and did all the other stuff mentioned here like gardening. That's cause they were raised to do it by people who lived through war in Europe and Depression here. 

 

Who is calling reasonable emergency stockpiling hoarding?  I doubt it is a real mental health professional. Don't worry, that is my opinion anyway (personal, not professional).

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

PlicketyCat

I know how you feel!  My extended family thinks I'm crazy too.  I haven't got the long term storable food so much as I've got sacks upon sacks of flour rice & staples, solar oven and other necessities so I can continue to cook.  I have a big problem though, not so much with the food but with where I live.  I don't think any of it will be useful unless I get out of this suburban neighbourhood (which we're planning) because right now, I'm living in a gold fish bowl.

Don't worry about being seen as an oddball.  I'd rather be a fed oddball than a starving 'normal' person.

 

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Exactly Annie.  BTW the people who get to decide what's pathological are trained professionals with decades of training, education and experience, not the press who are just looking for headlines.  My closest friend who is a combat veteran keeps teasing me about getting a bomb shelter next, but deep down I think he respects that I am taking a realistic approach to a possible threat. Better safe than sorry.

Denise

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

All I have to say on the issue is that while I sit in my comfy chair, eating my bacon sandwich that the pathological sheep initially questioned my sanity over. They can crawl around in the dirt looking for grass and bugs to eat, and drink from unfiltered puddles.

 

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Plickety -

I wouldn't get wrapped around the axle with your concerns.

I am doing all of what you outlined (and a bit more).

I also had the pleasure of meeting Denise at Lowesville and at Cat's request for an evaluation and professional opinion, she (Denise) gave me a clean bill of health.

Sort of............

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

I've been seen as an oddball all my life, so I'm not too worried about being seen as one now.  I'm just a bit alarmed that our society, as a whole it seems, has started seeing normal preparation and prudent storage in a negative light. In 1909, if someone only had 2 weeks  of food in the house, they pretty much knew they were screwed... in 2009, having more than 2 weeks of food makes you a "psycho".

The food storage guideline was probably the only thing that I didn't find strange about the LDS when I was married to my first husband. Other people thought it was a bit kookie, but I thought that was one of the more sensible things the religion had going for it. It shouldn't take the wrappings of quasi-cultism (survivalists -> religion) to make people prepare a little for bad situations.

Those "3-day Emergency Preparedness" kits make me laugh. At best, they're just mental pacification, because I've never been in an emergency situation that actually needed a "kit" that didn't need it for more than 3 days! It's either a minor blip over in hours, or you're screwed for awhile... who came up with 3 days?!  After Hurricane Bertha, we didn't have clean water for over a week and it took almost 2 weeks until the power was reliable again.... and that was just a little 'Cane. Sure, a 3-day kit is better than nothing, but lots of people think even having one of those around is a bit paranoid.

Humans are doomed, I swear!  (shaking head in disbelief)

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Gungnir wrote:

All I have to say on the issue is that while I sit in my comfy chair, eating my bacon sandwich that the pathological sheep initially questioned my sanity over. They can crawl around in the dirt looking for grass and bugs to eat, and drink from unfiltered puddles.

 

Outstanding.

Gungnir eloquently and poetically communicated the universal frustration that reasoning, independently thinking people have with the masses.

I myself will be enjoying a homemade grilled cheese sandwich (homemade cheddar, homemade bread, homemade tomato soup from homegrown tomatos) and reloading 9 mm rounds so that I can go out back (I'll be in the country within the year) and practice for pennies on the dollar. And maybe sell a few reloads to folks for some gasoline, silver, soap (can make that too, LOL), or balsamic vinegar.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
PlicketyCat wrote:

 

I have my suspicion that this may partly be a conspiracy to keep us all good little consumers... enslaved to the teat of the masters who control the masses by stripping away our self-sufficience.

BINGO!  Just another point of control...

And if you're deviant, then sign me up for the club, sister!

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

Plickety -

I wouldn't get wrapped around the axle with your concerns.

I am doing all of what you outlined (and a bit more).

I also had the pleasure of meeting Denise at Lowesville and at Cat's request for an evaluation and professional opinion, she (Denise) gave me a clean bill of health.

Sort of............

That's what she told you. She told us, in the "Dogs is Friggin' Certifiable" thread that you're a screwball.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Hi Plickety,

I am glad that you and Gungnir (I got the correct, right?) will be out of that neighborhood in a few months, especially since many of your younger neighbors view you as weird. Sounds like one of those movie scenarios where the prudent ones (you) get blamed for all the ills by the ill-prepared ones, so - the sooner you are out of there, the better.. Of course, I could be paranoid!  :-)

We talk about our prep work with friends and so on, but only after we have gauged how they think about these things. We have so far (to my knowledge) avoided attracting attention of the kinds you mentioned although we are also taking and have taken similar steps...

Wishing you the best.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
PlicketyCat wrote:

I've been seen as an oddball all my life, so I'm not too worried about being seen as one now.

Ditto...

PlicketyCat wrote:

The food storage guideline was probably the only thing that I didn't find strange about the LDS when I was married to my first husband wife.

Ditto !!!! ( but still married )

 

Cheer Hamish

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Yep, another lifelong member of "the club" here!  And, these days, boy is my husband glad I'm a practical little saver.  The trick is to be organized.  If the cupboard of food is all neatly arranged and the medical supplies are all inventoried, etc. not only can you have a lot more in a limited amount of space, but at least the people worth impressing will be impressed.

"They" want us to keep on buying and using up junk -- it just makes people stupid and compliant.

becky

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

If I am not mistaken FDR said many negative things about "hoarders" in some of his fireside chats in the early 30's. This was a while before he confiscated all the gold.  I think it was probably to try and keep the sheep in line.

Since it was a bit before my time I am going on recollection of things I read some time ago. Sorry, I don't have a reference  maybe some else has a reference.

 

Ken

 

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Hi Plickety,

The main issue I see is that your neighbours know you are prepared and so they may turn to you for help that you may or may not be willing to give.  I had a situation whereby I was stuck in freezing conditions in a car jam when going skiing one year, we were stopped for ages due to heavy snow and avalanches. I got out 10L of water, a pan, kettle and a small gas stove, warmed food for my daughter (we was about 14 months) and did hot drinks for the rest of us in the car; the looks I go from folks in cars around.......  I learned a valuable lesson that day!!  I guess their reaction is normal as the stores are always full of stuff and if they are out, well, there will be a delivery tomorrow.

I had a chat with a family friend at the weekend who was round our house and she saw a copy of " the end of food: the coming crisis in the world food industry" by Paul Roberts and she asked why I was reading it.  Well, it burst her bubble to put in mildly after I showed her a could of websites and articles from alternative media and mainstream media sources.  Her reaction was, it can't happen, too many people would be affected, I replied "it would be nice to think that wouldn't it"....."but I prefer to have some insurance and to teach the kids about food and gardening as well as other basic skills.....".  The positive is that she wants to read some of the books I have, so hopefully a convert there.

I know people who only have cornflakes and 0.5L of milk in the house and the day's dinner is what ever they pick-up from the supermarket.

All in all its just to cosy to live with the notion of a world of goods at your fingertips that's just a mall strip away

As for crazy...I have only eve met (knowingly) one person who could prove is sanity...I shared an apartment with him when I first went to University....scary guy!!

Britinbe

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
PlicketyCat wrote:

<snip>

Those "3-day Emergency Preparedness" kits make me laugh. At best, they're just mental pacification, because I've never been in an emergency situation that actually needed a "kit" that didn't need it for more than 3 days! It's either a minor blip over in hours, or you're screwed for awhile... who came up with 3 days?!  After Hurricane Bertha, we didn't have clean water for over a week and it took almost 2 weeks until the power was reliable again.... and that was just a little 'Cane. Sure, a 3-day kit is better than nothing, but lots of people think even having one of those around is a bit paranoid.

Humans are doomed, I swear!  (shaking head in disbelief)

PlicketyCat,

Perhaps I can put the "3-day Emergency Preparedness" kits issue into perspective. It is something I learned when I took a local Community Emergency Response Training (CERT) course across a number of weeks. The intent was to train civilians to be able to manage on their own until first responders (police/fire/ambulance) were able to assist. At the time the course was put together, 3-days was considered an appropriate minimum amount of time.

Unfortunately, as you point out from experience, 3-days won't cut it in any serious disaster. However, if people can be convinced of the need to store up for an emergency by training them to accumulate 3-days worth of emergency supplies, that's a good starting point.

When folks come to this site in a panic not knowing where to start, I usually recommend that they try to imagine how they would survive if they were marooned in their house for at least 3-days. This gets them to, hopefully, calm down a bit and start thinking rationally. It's not that hard to put together a 3-day kit and people can handle that reasonably easily once they think about it. Once they get into a planning/survival mode, it's easier to then get them thinking longer term.

It's like the old adage, "How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time!" 

 

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Well, unless our current neighbors want to follow us 3k+ miles up into the wilds of Alaska, they won't be able to come over and beg us for help LOL.  One of our retired neighbor couples are bugging out to their cabin in the hills, and I helped them figure out their rain catchment/garden irrigation system... so it's not like I'm above helping folks prepare or anything. I was hoping to convert a few of our more skeptical neighbors while explaining why we had so much food and how we were going to package it up, etc... but, no, only their kids seemed interested. Maybe the kids can work behind the scenes to pressure the parents into making better decisions.  These are the same kids who want to come play in our yard with the flowers (a.k.a. "weeds") because their lawn nazi parents have to have a pristine lawn. Boy, you should have seen the look on their faces when I plucked a dandelion leaf and ate it... they'd never heard of anyone eating weeds before ROFL!

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

I gotta say you are very right about the younger generation. I am only 26, and I get it all the time (and the scary part is I am in the military). I get the jokes any time talks when talks about the economy kick in, " We could all be like Congero and have 20lb bags of rice, and food storage...blah blah blah."

Then I get the others that try to physiologically evaluate me, " I think he falls under this social 'unwritten' law that states that when a normal individual feels his way of life threatened, they go into protectionist mode...."  These are the ones that become speechless when I start talking numbers and statistics (with references); they hate it. These are all the ones between 18-30yrs old

On a positive note, I am now getting 3 times more that want to learn and know more about whats coming then the ones that think I'm crazy. It is sad that there are still so many that just ignore everything.

Personally, I would have to second gungnir (and I'm sure the rest of us). I still have more to do, but I am also at a point where I would not be screwed if things hit the fan tomorrow. That in itself helps me sleep better knowing that my wife and son will have food to eat, and skills to build something on.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

T1G,

Quote:

" We could all be like Congero and have 20lb bags of rice, and food storage...blah blah blah."

I got a similar routine from a fella in his 60's.
I mentioned getting away from the stock market to a fellow that works near me, and he looked at me like I was literally an imbecile.
So he asks "Do you think it'll fail or something?" 
I reply "Absolutely." And throw out some numbers, at which point he interjects "Never happen. They won't let it."

Speechless, I stood there looking at him as he passes a look of scorn and leaves.

The younger folks don't realize because they're immature and inexperienced. This guy has no excuse. His Parents lived through what we're staring dead in the eyes saying "You don't exist! I won't let you!"

So I think it has more to do with the laws of averages. There are more 18-30 yr olds in the military, so we talk to them more.
Outside, the sheep express in monosylibic "baaahs" why there is no chance of anything bad happening, regardless of their age or standing in the flock. Because honestly, who wants to admit that the farmer is bankrupt and can't repair the fence?

Who's going to listen to the real dogs and say "They're right".

No matter if you believe in Nature or Nurture, the fact remains that once people have passed their formative years, they become so deeply entrenched in their ideals that it's painful to consider that they're incorrect. I'm that same way. I'm mortified of raising children in a world that just continues on this path ad infinitum.

Cheers, and just be who and what you are, be damned the onlookers.

Aaron

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Denise wrote:

I am a psychiatrist and see nothing pathological about preparing for emergencies.  Hoarding is more along the lines of the Collier brothers' behavior, keeping years of newspapers and trash and rigging your home to kill intruders (for example) or keeping 200 cats in a 3 bedroom home.  Plickety, I treat hoarders for a living, this is not hoarding.  My parents used to keep several months worth of food at home routinely because they canned their own fruits and had a big freezer and did all the other stuff mentioned here like gardening. That's cause they were raised to do it by people who lived through war in Europe and Depression here. 

 

Who is calling reasonable emergency stockpiling hoarding?  I doubt it is a real mental health professional. Don't worry, that is my opinion anyway (personal, not professional).

Denise. I hope that you don't think that I was assailing psychiatry. My point was that a lot of behaviors and actions that, in my layman's opinion, are quite normal (having observed them all of my life by many folks) are now being politicized to the degree of being an illness. Powerful people with political agendas know that mental illness still has a potent stigma and is also a potent discrediting agent. For those advocating preparation as a mental illness, my BS meter immediately goes into the red in terms of "why are they trying to project this image?".

No affront on any particular discipline. I hope you realize that. :)

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Plickety Cat,

You're OK and we're OK. In a world of craziness, when one acts in a rational manner, one appears psychologically deviant because one is acting differently from the confused herd.  As a student of history, investing, science, health, etc., I've found that very often, the herd is mistaken.  Unfortunately, people from Galileo to Pasteur to the medical doctor who discovered that washing one's hands is important in stopping the spread of disease (i.e. people who have been right while the masses have been wrong) have always aroused the ire of the establishment and/or the masses.  Jesus is another classic example.  Shaking up the status quo can, in fact, be downright dangerous at times.  

Nevertheless, I'm doing the same things you are and other things as well.  From a moral perspective, I see taking care of my own family as my first priority but I also think it's imperative that we spread the word.  In addition, the more prepared I am, the better equipped I am to help others when the time comes.  On the other hand, I'm only going to plant seed in fertile ground, so to speak.  If I bring up these issues and am dismissed or vigorously opposed, I move on to those who are more receptive.  Also, from a security perspective, other than my immediate family, no one knows the extent of what I'm doing.

Happily, I am finding that more and more people are coming over to our way of thinking.  Unbeknownst to me initially, even my next door neighbor has been making similar preparations.  Also, I'm having a meeting with some people this week who contacted me about what we can do locally as a community.  I've been accumulating a database of similarly oriented people who are friends or acquaintances (I come in contact with a broad spectrum of the population in my business) who have an array of skills and knowledge that would be complementary to one another in a SHTF scenario including a physician, dentist, farmer, animal husbandry specialist, logger, gunsmith, carpenter, mechanic, and others.  Many of us have skills in foraging, fishing, and hunting and some have combat experience as well. 

It still amazes me, however, how many people put their faith and hope in the stock market and believe the Wall Street talking heads rather than positioning themselves to be financially secure.  Most people that I know still do not have any PM and know little about investing other than trusting some mutual fund manager who has already handed them a huge loss and will probably sustain deeper losses in the future.  It also amazes me how many people blindly load themselves up with pharmaceuticals and have surgical procedures performed for problems that can usually be resolved with natural, conservative remedies.  They have bought into the propaganda sold them by the insurance and pharmaceutical companies and by too many in the medical establishment. In particular, it amazes me how many people are reliant upon the government and the MSM rather than studying and learning things for themselves from sources other than the boob tube.  They really don't have a clue as to the true nature of things.  But awareness is growing and hopefully, all of us here can help.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Well, I did get one funny look from an older gent who lives on the corner when he asked how I could afford all the stuff we've been stocking up on recently and I told him that we'd liquidated our retirement accounts. Flabbergasted, he asked what we were planning to live on when we retired. I told him we were "retiring" now and would be living off the fruits of our own labor, hence why were stocking up on equipment, seeds, foodstuffs, etc. He just stood there gaping and "but, but, you can't do that".   Ummmm why not?  He didn't have an answer.

The way I figure it, I got at least 20 years to get the survival & self-reliance thing down to a well-oiled routine before I even have to begin thinking about whether I can keep doing it when I'm "old"  

Besides, I'd rather die on my land than live on my knees.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Pete In Florida wrote:

That's what she told you. She told us, in the "Dogs is Friggin' Certifiable" thread that you're a screwball.

Pete -

She told me that as well, but it was one of the other voices in my head who heard it while I was safe in the Big Chair. 

Sybil the Hoarder if I am not mistaken.

Other than that, card carrying Friggin' Certifiable works.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

DIAP-

Thank you for vouching for me, I have been feeling much stressed of late.  It was very good meeting you and Cat and the other good people at Lowesville, so clean bill of health given free of charge!  

Be well and have a great Memorial Day

Denise

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Pete

Thank you for responding to my post and I apologize for getting defensive, am a bit stressed lately and I am grateful for your clarificatio.   I agree pathologizing behavior as mental illness is a way of marginalizing and eliminating political opposition. I have learned this from my Russian patients who have told me how psychiatric hospitals were used as political prisons back in the day.  I also know of a lesbian woman who was hospitalized (not  a patient of mine) for being gay again back in the day her in the good old USA.  Frankly it is just a step away from witch hunts. 

I agree with you, it seems that pathologizing stockpiling for an emergency (or any other sane normal reaction) is a way to discredit those of us who see a big problem on the horizon. 

Have a good holiday

Denise

 

 

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

 Hi, I just joined up here, though I'm not sure if it's in fact a compatible place or not (joining was a response to one small blog Chris wrote not directly related to what seems to be a site concerned with finance, rather than the personally oriented blog of that day), but I did want to comment on the hoarding issue.  I think you're trying to mix apples and oranges here - the hoarding you seem to be concerned about is almost the type of thing done all over Utah as a tenet of Mormonism - a planned and controlled project of stockpiling against a possibly deprived future, whereas the hoarding most people call pathological has nothing to do with that, but rather a (strong) tendency to acquire 'things' of any and all nature as a response to depression, an obsessive and completely uncontrolled "packrat" drive that apparently satisfies an irrational need to 'collect', but devoid of any logical plan for the future.  It almost seems a shame to attack such people for something they can't control (without help), by equating it to the thought out storage of e.g. food, for the long term in case of real need.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Denise wrote:

I agree with you, it seems that pathologizing stockpiling for an emergency (or any other sane normal reaction) is a way to discredit those of us who see a big problem on the horizon.

I'm not so sure, that it's actively discrediting those who see the bigger picture, I think it's intrinsic.

There's an old cliche that I've learned in my experience that is totally wrong

"In the world of the blind the one eyed man is king."

Well what I've found is that

"In the world of the blind, the one-eyed man is considered insane"

Those of us who can see the bigger picture and anticipate problems are the one-eyed men (or persons to be more gender neutral), unfortunately the blind who can't see the bigger picture (or even sometimes the smaller picture) think that what were talking about is impossible. Imagine a dog that could see in color, telling his buddy to eat out of the red bowl, the other dog has no point of reference or even understanding as to what red is, people are the same, just that we're not discussing colored bowls.I think the thing that makes it worse is the even after you've identified a problem, and avoided it, those who could not see it coming, but saw what happened when it arrived, learn nothing from that experience and the next time around the same routine occurs. Unfortunately the people I'm speaking about are some of the best and the brightest, so this doesn't seem to be an intellectual problem, more an instinctive or emotional issue people have.

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Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Welcome to the site Rima -

If you haven't taken the time yet, you should watch through "The Crash Course" presentation.

That is the heart and soul of the site, and as you've noted, there is a huge spectrum of discussion topics.  Much of the site threads are devoted to a specific aspect of preparing for whatever is coming - food, water, security, etc.  There are great threads on permaculture, gardening, solar power.  Some of the threads are purely for social interaction and decompression, other threads are for controversial topic discussions (conspiracies, Planet X, perpetual energy).  You obviously can pick and choose where you want to participate (or not) .  What you will find is that there are a lot of smart people out there with a wealth of info to share.

But it all comes back to the Crash Course - please take the time to go through it, digest it, assess the material for yourself and figure out what you might need to do with the material.

Again, welcome.

Ken C's picture
Ken C
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 13 2009
Posts: 753
Re: Hoarding - negative connotations
Gungnir wrote:
Denise wrote:

I agree with you, it seems that pathologizing stockpiling for an emergency (or any other sane normal reaction) is a way to discredit those of us who see a big problem on the horizon.

I'm not so sure, that it's actively discrediting those who see the bigger picture, I think it's intrinsic.

There's an old cliche that I've learned in my experience that is totally wrong

"In the world of the blind the one eyed man is king."

Well what I've found is that

"In the world of the blind, the one-eyed man is considered insane"

Those of us who can see the bigger picture and anticipate problems are the one-eyed men (or persons to be more gender neutral), unfortunately the blind who can't see the bigger picture (or even sometimes the smaller picture) think that what were talking about is impossible. Imagine a dog that could see in color, telling his buddy to eat out of the red bowl, the other dog has no point of reference or even understanding as to what red is, people are the same, just that we're not discussing colored bowls.I think the thing that makes it worse is the even after you've identified a problem, and avoided it, those who could not see it coming, but saw what happened when it arrived, learn nothing from that experience and the next time around the same routine occurs. Unfortunately the people I'm speaking about are some of the best and the brightest, so this doesn't seem to be an intellectual problem, more an instinctive or emotional issue people have.

 

Gungnir,

 

Well said. I agree completely, It is not that most of the people that don't see what is coming are stupid or ignorant. They just don't seem to be able to arrive at the same logical (to me) conclusion about the future. Many of these people that I am talking about are not neighbors or acquintences they are my family. So for this reason I am keeping my (our) preparations for the future in a low profile so that I am only viewed as eccentric and not crazy. In a year or two or whenever the worst happens the preparations that I have made will be the life boat for us all.

 

Ken

 

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Hoarding - negative connotations

Personally, I don't care whether people think I'm a nutter because I'm stockpiling necessities. I'm just marveling at the fact that the mentality of "saving for a rainy day" has been so utterly discarded in this country... to the point where the majority populace finds that behavior to be synonymous with neurotic, obsessive-compulsive hoarding. I know that most psych professionals wouldn't consider what I, or anyone else, preparing was necessarily pathological... but I think some of them would probably think we were being a little paranoid and alarmist.  My psychologist thinks all the preparation I'm doing is wonderful, but she doesn't believe that things will get as bad as I think they will... but she does admit that she doesn't want to believe that they will get that bad, not necessarily that I need to be locked up for excessive paranoia.

I'm just disheartened by that sneaky little "conspiracy" that has been so successful in convincing the majority populace to be good little consumers, to enslave ourselves to debt, to prostitute ourselves at jobs we hate to service those debts while earning pennies on the dollar that the Fat Cats get off our labor, and then to pacify our aching souls with more useless consumeristic crap!  I was holding out hope that the brainwashing wasn't as pervasive as I feared, but my neighbors reactions to our preparations has convinced me that it's true. Insanity and Heresy have been used for eons by tyrannical systems to eliminate the freethinkers and nonconformers... it's just sad that we still haven't grown out of those tactics :(

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