Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

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Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

Like many Martenson readers, I have been deeply involved in an intensive plan to prepare our family for economic collapse, as well as interruptions in services.  Many of the posts on this site and others have been infinitely helpful in this task.  However, I am alarmed at the apparent lack of attention to providing for healthcare as this crisis evolves.  

Many of us will find ourselves unemployed, and therefore, lacking health insurance.  Many of us will also be experiencing stressors at an unprecedented level, and some will have suboptimal diets.  This will likely to lead to an increase of a variety of both acute and chronic disorders, placing additional burden on the family and community. 

In light of these concerns, after food and gold, my attention has been focused on improving the current health of all of my family members, and ensuring that they will remain healthy and productive contributors to our family and community.  I consider this essential to the success of our sustainability plan.  The question is, how can I best accomplish this, in a way that is both sustainable and affordable? 

In considering this problem, I have drawn on my extensive experience as a critical care nurse, as well as additional informal education in the area of alternative medicine.  Here are my conclusions:

  • The traditional medical model is woefully inadequate in accurately diagnosing and treating the most common ailments, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and the wide variety of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.  The traditional medical model relies on the treatment of disease symptoms, with drugs that are toxic, rather than getting to the root cause of the disease.  This results in a progressive deterioration in quality of life, and eventually, death.
  • Traditional health insurance does not ensure health; it only ensures that one will be protected from financial ruin after a protracted, and often unsuccessful, treatment. 
  • The cost of traditional healthcare is completely unrelated to the quality of outcome for the patient.  In fact, the vast majority of Medicare benefits are paid on services received within 6 weeks of death.  That doesn't say much for the efficacy of traditional medicine.
  • The vast majority of common diseases are both preventable and curable by applying principles of toxin avoidance and detoxification of those who are already toxin laden.  This includes the vast majority of people throughout the world.  Detoxification, avoidance of future toxin exposure, and nutritional strategies for assisting the body in handling unavoidable toxin exposure are the most important things anyone can do in insuring one's future health.
  • Once the body is unburdened from its toxin load, with a fully functional immune system, and robust organ systems, episodes of illness are rare.  Most of these can be very effectively treated with inexpensive, low tech herbal and nutritional strategies. 

In conclusion, relying on traditional medicine is a wholly inadequate and unreliable means of ensuring health, even in the best of times.  During the times ahead, it will be necessary to have an inexpensive, low tech, adaptable means of preventing and treating disease.  My strategy for accomplishing that is to use nutritional and other detoxification strategies, to remove and avoid toxins in our home and work environments, and to gain a deep knowledge of herbal and other low-tech health practices, so that I can provide adequate healthcare to my family, even in the event of inaccessible or unaffordable traditional health care.

I would like to suggest starting a forum for others who are interested in this approach.  I can share some excellent resources, and would be interested in hearing others' wisdom.

Sandman3369's picture
Sandman3369
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

  All good suggestions and ideas to contemplate.  I, as one of my many steps, have been draining my VEBA to have any dentistry my family needs done before it disappears.  Maybe I should look into some old medical textbooks and such....

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

 .

Sandman3369's picture
Sandman3369
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

    Luckily I have 'perfect' teeth.  The SO and kids... that's another story, but they haven't had much work in the past.  Amazingly expensive...

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness
c1oudfire wrote:

I would like to suggest starting a forum for others who are interested in this approach.  I can share some excellent resources, and would be interested in hearing others' wisdom.

 

c1oudfire,

I would say you've already made an excellent start with this forum. I would be interested in any suggestions that you have that would be beneficial if the current health-care system collapsed.

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

 

Thanks, Sam.  I think a good place to start is with some of the excellent resource books on detoxification.  The way I look at it, I have the resources now to implement some of the strategies (mercury amalgam removal, supplements, infrared sauna) that will help my family unload the accumulated toxins from living in the 20th century.  Already, we have experienced nearly complete resolution of several conditions, including residual joint pain from lyme disease, chronic fatigue, depression, and insomnia.  And we're really just getting started. 

One good starting point is the sensationally titled, but sensible book, Detoxify or Die, by Sherry A. Rogers, MD.  She provides well-grounded, easily understood explanations of the basic concepts, as well as a blueprint for detoxification and maintenance of health. 

We are avoiding both GMO and nonorganic foods whenever possible, and of course, this will be made more possible by veggie gardening, and perhaps some light livestock.  I am also stocking up on a variety of bulk herbs (remarkably inexpensive), for treatment of minor injuries, rashes, infections, gastrointestinal disturbances, and so on.  I've been gathering the equipment and learning techniques for making simple poultices, infusions, and the like.  I plan to put in a medicinal garden soon.

We are making most of our toiletries and household cleaners from common, ordinary, nontoxic and inexpensive ingredients.  This helps make us more self-sufficient, as well. 

I think it is wise to start implementing off-the-grid health maintenance now, so that if the healthcare system starts functioning badly, we are confident with the techniques, healthy going in, and as independent from the medical model of healthcare as possible. 

 Let me know if there is anything specific I can help with. 

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SamLinder
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness
c1oudfire wrote:

Thanks, Sam.  I think a good place to start is with some of the excellent resource books on detoxification.  The way I look at it, I have the resources now to implement some of the strategies (mercury amalgam removal, supplements, infrared sauna) that will help my family unload the accumulated toxins from living in the 20th century.  Already, we have experienced nearly complete resolution of several conditions, including residual joint pain from lyme disease, chronic fatigue, depression, and insomnia.  And we're really just getting started. 

One good starting point is the sensationally titled, but sensible book, Detoxify or Die, by Sherry A. Rogers, MD.  She provides well-grounded, easily understood explanations of the basic concepts, as well as a blueprint for detoxification and maintenance of health. 

We are avoiding both GMO and nonorganic foods whenever possible, and of course, this will be made more possible by veggie gardening, and perhaps some light livestock.  I am also stocking up on a variety of bulk herbs (remarkably inexpensive), for treatment of minor injuries, rashes, infections, gastrointestinal disturbances, and so on.  I've been gathering the equipment and learning techniques for making simple poultices, infusions, and the like.  I plan to put in a medicinal garden soon.

We are making most of our toiletries and household cleaners from common, ordinary, nontoxic and inexpensive ingredients.  This helps make us more self-sufficient, as well. 

I think it is wise to start implementing off-the-grid health maintenance now, so that if the healthcare system starts functioning badly, we are confident with the techniques, healthy going in, and as independent from the medical model of healthcare as possible. 

Let me know if there is anything specific I can help with.

 

Hi c1oudfire,

Let me know if there is anything specific I can help with.

All of the above!  Wink

1. I'm curious about what type of "bulk herbs" you are stocking.

2. Recipes for your nontoxic and inexpensive toiletries and household cleaners.

3. What do you plant for a "medicinal garden"?

4. What kind of veggie garden are you putting together?

Thank you!

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

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Aura's picture
Aura
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Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness
c1oudfire wrote:

 

I think it is wise to start implementing off-the-grid health maintenance now, so that if the healthcare system starts functioning badly, we are confident with the techniques, healthy going in, and as independent from the medical model of healthcare as possible.  

 I am thinking along these lines, as well. We just finished a bought of noravirus (I think) and managed to get everyone through it without ANY conventional medicines. Not even Tylenlol, and EVERYONE came down with fevers. However, I kept a very close watch on everyone and was much more diligent about their care than if I had used conventional medicines. Still, knowing how dangerous it can be when little ones start throwing up (dehydration) and fevers start hitting upwards of 102 degrees, it was nice to know that if I couldn't treat it, I had a trusted pediatrician just a phone call away.

That might not be the case in the future, and it would have been a scary situation indeed if I had not had any access to health care or even basic medicines like Tylenol.

Herbs are great to learn how to use. They do require commonsense and some knowledge. Many are poisonous, and for many you can use some parts (like the root) but not other parts (like the leaves). Also, many are easily found in the wild and eaten like a vegetable. Dandelion works great in a salad and is great for detoxing!

Speaking of which, I second the detoxing idea, too. Our bodies have amazing abilities to heal themselves and protect themselves from diseases, but not if they're bogged down with toxins. Many diseases and such (especially with the immune system) can be traced back to having too many toxins in our bodies.

This is definitely one area of preparedness you don't want to forget about!

There is also another thread talking about a potential health crisis looming in the future in much the same way as the three E's. It was really good. Look it up, or maybe someone can post a link....I've got to go.

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: Healthcare: A glaring omission in crash preparedness

 

Thanks Aura, for your comments.  I second all that you said, especially the warnings that one must not use herbal treatments without caution.  In my experience, however, herbal treatments are generally more gentle on the system than conventional medicines, if used with some wisdom.  I can't count the number of patients that I've seen damaged, sometimes lethally, by the "side effects" of conventional medical treatments.  People generally blindly accept them, often without investigating the alternatives, and without watching carefully for adverse effects. 

Kudos for your courage and diligence, and for trusting yourself to be able to manage self-sufficiently.  It's wise to learn the ropes, while there is still readily available conventional healthcare for backup. 

Of course, I do not advocate neglecting medical care, in the event of existing serious health issues, or for conditions that are beyond the scope of home remedies.  But I do advocate making a transition to natural detoxification and treatments, in the event that conventional healthcare becomes inaccessible. 

 

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