Health care fascism up for Senate vote

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machinehead's picture
machinehead
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2008
Posts: 1077
Health care fascism up for Senate vote

Bloomberg's Betsy McCaughey spills the beans on Tom Daschle's plan to worm his way in between you and your doctor --

Feb. 9 (Bloomberg) -- Republican Senators are questioning
whether President Barack Obama’s stimulus bill contains the
right mix of tax breaks and cash infusions to jump-start the
economy. Tragically, no one from either party is objecting to the
health provisions slipped in without discussion. These
provisions reflect the handiwork of Tom Daschle, until recently
the nominee to head the Health and Human Services Department. Senators should read these provisions and vote against them
because they are dangerous to your health. (Page numbers refer
to H.R. 1 EH, pdf version).

The bill’s health rules will affect “every individual in
the United States” (445, 454, 479). Your medical treatments
will be tracked electronically by a federal system.
Having
electronic medical records at your fingertips, easily
transferred to a hospital, is beneficial. It will help avoid
duplicate tests and errors.

But the bill goes further. One new bureaucracy, the
National Coordinator of Health Information
Technology, will monitor treatments to make sure your doctor is
doing what the federal government deems appropriate and cost
effective. The goal is to reduce costs and “guide” your
doctor’s decisions (442, 446). These provisions in the stimulus
bill are virtually identical to what Daschle prescribed in his
2008 book, “Critical: What We Can Do About the Health-Care
Crisis
.” According to Daschle, doctors have to give up autonomy
and “learn to operate less like solo practitioners.”

Keeping doctors informed of the newest medical findings is
important, but enforcing uniformity goes too far. Hospitals and doctors that are not “meaningful users” of
the new system will face penalties. “Meaningful user” isn’t
defined in the bill. That will be left to the HHS secretary, who
will be empowered to impose “more stringent measures of
meaningful use over time” (511, 518, 540-541)

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601039&refer=columnist_mccaughe...

Since 2005, the U.S. already has a Big Brother
prescription-monitoring system called NASPER. Insurance companies love
this. For instance, they charge higher life insurance rates to anyone
on antidepressants, since the statistical risk of suicide is higher.

Already, the U.S. offers no financial privacy -- your income and
assets are an open book to the IRS or litigants. Under federal law, the
confidentiality of discussions with lawyers and accountants has been
seriously breached. Now under Tom D'Aschole's health fascism, you will
have no medical privacy either. The most intimate details of your
mental and reproductive health will be accessible to any prying
bureaucrat.

Any resemblance between this fascist horror and the 'liberty'
proclaimed in the declaration is an accidental oversight, which will be
addressed in the next bill. Please report to your mandatory physician
appointment. We need to probe your colon..

 

VeganDB12's picture
VeganDB12
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 731
Re: Health care fascism up for Senate vote

This seems like an obvious prelude to nationalized healthcare (through the backdoor albeit) and illustrates one of the drawbacks of a nationalized healthcare system, mainly lack of control over and confidentiality of medical care.  The institution of the National Provider Identifier registry for all healthcare works is also another prelude to this, and I suspect the system will be some combination of medicare (we are all already enrolled to the extent that we have social security numbers which are the identifier for medicare) as now it has a prescription plan.  I work in health care and while I support in earnest the provision of healthcare for all U.S. citizens there are serious drawbacks to a national health care system as it is evolving here in the U.S.. The VA system is probably the best living example of the ups and downs of government run healthcare (and I do not mean to disparage the VA, just to give an example of what it might look like for the rest of us if the feds take over; in my experience VA definitely has many fine and dedicated staff).

I work in mental health and I am loath to put my records on the internet in any way no matter what privacy firewalls are installed.   As much as accuracy is improved with computerization re: medication refills and lab reports, software can limit and alter how data is input and how it can be interpreted.  I recently had a test done at my doctor's office, rated one of the most "efficient" group practices in the country by a national business publication. He is a fine doctor. The computer interpreting the test misread it as abnormal even though it was normal  and I have spent 3 years trying to get this corrected on my computerized medical record.  Apparently the correction can only be done by a subspecialist (who certainly may not see this as a priority) but now getting disability insurance is more complicated because of one little incorrect report that cannot be corrected on paper or by anyone other than a very busy and expensive subspecialist that I do not even know. The feds can also deny coverage based on the data and still stick the patient with the bill.

 

There are real drawbacks to this computerization that will take many years to work out.  And I can see my patients and I are being forced into it. Oh well....I think this is a way to mobilize monies for jobs in tech and healthcare so there is an upside in that regard.

 

Denise

 

 

 

 

 

machinehead's picture
machinehead
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2008
Posts: 1077
Re: Health care fascism up for Senate vote
Denszcz wrote:

I recently had a test done ... The computer
interpreting the test misread it as abnormal even though it was normal
and I have spent 3 years trying to get this corrected on my
computerized medical record ... now getting disability insurance is
more complicated because of one little incorrect report that cannot be
corrected on paper or by anyone other than a very busy and expensive
subspecialist that I do not even know. The feds can also deny coverage
based on the data and still stick the patient with the bill.

Thanks for your informative comments. This is a perfect example of a centralized database with no accountability. Your three years
spent trying to correct a trivial error reminds me of two other
databases. One is the TSA watch list, which is almost impossible to get
out of, even if you were put into it by mistake. A second example would be the
credit rating agencies, which give 100 percent credibility to creditor
reports (even if they are wrong) and zero percent credibility to
corrections submitted by consumers. So you can go round and round and
round with them (as I have done), but no matter how many times you
submit a correction, it never shows up.

This unresponsive,
unaccountable database is horrible, both from the standpoint of what it
can do to your insurability, as well as its invasion of privacy.
Certain meds I now order from overseas pharmacies, bypassing the
medical gatekeeper to save money. But also, if the FBI or some snooping
KongressKlown checks my NASPER prescription file ... it's blank. When
I visit medical offices, I 'mistakenly' submit a transposed SSN in
order to scramble their database. Under a fascist regime, throwing sand
into the gears of the system isn't just an option ... it's a DUTY.

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