Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

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Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

If we can pull our attention away from the stock market, the price of gold, the audit the fed bill, etc., perhaps we can have a moment of silence for all life on the Gulf Coast of this country. This is a cataclysmic event with no end in sight. This is video about Louisiana but a couple of days ago oil was found ashore in Alabama. Anyone ever been to the panhandle of Florida? No? Go now you will never see it like it is again.

V

ps  Some idiot two days ago told me a friend of his in the oil business said we have plenty of oil reserves and there is no peak oil. Why are we drilling in 5 miles of ocean then?

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Drilling in one mile, not five.  But, point taken and I fully agree.

 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

V,

As someone who lives on the Texas Gulf Coast, I'm currently stagnating in the "denial stage of awareness" of this disaster. The crazy thing about this is that the local beaches have never been more beautiful. My family and I have been going down to the beach 3-4 times a week, because we know its never going to be the same again. The surfing and bodyboarding have been fantastic.

Too bad my 2 year old daughter will never remember the beach in this way.

 

The Sun is setting on the Gulf of Mexico. Its going to be a long night, full of nightmares.

 

 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill May Approach Texas Early Next Week

From Dr. Jeff Master's Blog: Weather Underground (The Dr. M for Hurricane Info)

Oil spill may approach Texas early next week
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill has pushed steadily westward along the Louisiana coast, and is expected to reach central Louisiana near Atchafalaya Bay by Thursday, according to the latest trajectory forecasts from NOAA. Winds over the Gulf of Mexico this week will blow from the southeast at 15 - 20 knots, threatening to bring oil to large portions of the Louisiana coast. The Mississippi and Alabama coasts will also be at risk, but the risk to the Florida Panhandle is lower. It appears quite unlikely that oil will get into the Loop Current anytime over the next two weeks, and spread to the Florida Keys and beyond. However, the strong southeast winds are expected to shift more easterly late this week, and drive a westward-moving ocean surface current with a speed of 1 - 2 mph along the west coast of Louisiana late this week (Figure 2). This current may be capable of transporting oil all the way to the Louisiana/Texas border by Monday. However, the concentrations of oil in the water will be much less than what is present close to the blowout, and it is unclear what the potential danger is for the western Louisiana and eastern Texas coasts. The greatest danger is to the Eastern Louisiana coast.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill May Approach Texas Early Next Week

God help the barrier islands of Texas. Especially South Padre one of the most incredible places in the world.  

V

PS You have my thoughts and prayers with you and your family JAG. I don't think I could bear to watch it.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Jeff Masters my be the Dr. M of Hurricanes but he is off on where the oil is going. It is already on land in Alabama,

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/05/oil-hits-louisiana-shores-exclus...

There is video and stills of oil on land from 2 days ago. Bur he may be useful soon as hurricane season starts in a few weeks. Sheesh that is all we need now.

V

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill May Approach Texas Early Next Week

I grew up in Corpus Christi, and watched in disbelief when the oil came ashore after the Pemex distaster in 1979 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I).  It is estimated that only  3,000,000 barrels of oil made it to Texas beaches.  If things looked THAT awful JUST from 3M barrels... I can't think about what this is going to do.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

V,

April 11, Genoa, Italy: Haven spilled 42 million gallons of oil in Genoa port. Nov. 10, Saint John's, Newfoundland: Odyssey spilled 43 million gallons of oil. April, North Sea: blowout of well in Ekofisk oil field leaked 81 million gallons. Ixtoc I, 140 million gallons of oil

140 million gallons is 3.3 million barrels. Not to downplay the gulf incident, but 5,000 to 10,000 barrels per day pales in comparison to the Ixtoc  and other much larger splills. Perhaps the situation will not turn out as bad as originally thought?

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

BMT 

As far as I know the fat lady is still singing. She just might sing for months and no one really knows how loud she is singing.

V

PS Would you care to eat some gulf shrimp? How about some oysters?

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=524_1273510578

Watch that video V, its a pilot that did a flyover of the area. He's a environmentalist and says this is the worst thing he has seen. I just found it right now. Im hoping to God that this isnt as bad as some people fear. Ive read reports of 5,000 bpd to 50,000 bpd. At the present time I dont know what to believe. So much sealife, and human livelihoods at risk.

Im not trying to downplay this at all, just hoping for the best. I too fear that this could be a huge catastrophe :(

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

I'm headed to the beach right now to watch the sun go down....can't forget the liquid refreshments. Thanks for the kind words V.

A toast to the great Gulf of Mexico, and a middle finger to BP, you arrogant bastards.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Jag, your photos of the Texas Gulf Coast are hauntingly beautiful.  They should be just beautiful.  I'm so sorry this is happening near where you live!!  I have just recently had the pleasure of visiting the Gulf Coast in Florida, off season, and fell in love with the beauty of it.  It makes me sick to think that it too may be spoiled by this.

BMT, that video is  hard to watch!  What an awful waste of one of nature's masterpieces.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

My uncle has a beach house on a barrier island just E of Pensacola.  I'm afraid to call him and find out how he's feeling.  The beauty and fun to be had down there -- I have very fond memories going back 30+ years.  To think it could all get tanked really, really bums me out.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill May Approach Texas Early Next Week

Blessed be, with what you have in the moment...............

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

I think BP trying to consolidate all the lawsuits into Texas courts is precursor to bankruptcy protection.  I don't think there is any way they can pay for this disaster.  Maybe putting the number 3 oil company out of f'n business, might turn a few offshore drillers heads.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Jeff,

Thanks for sharing the photos and your personal experience. A dose of the reality of how this is affecting people from someone you "know" (on the site at least) is really a sobering feeling.

All the finger pointing on TV really ticks me off. For crying out loud, BP, you're going to be held accountable no matter what. Please stop pointing fingers and just admit you screwed up!

I think this whole thing has the potential to accelerate Peak Oil by at least a couple of years. The public outcry to ban offshore drilling entirely is going to be enormous.

Erik

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Thanks everyone for the kind words. Your Texas Costal reporter, JAG, reports that the Texas beaches have no oil that I can see, just a bunch of seaweed, which probably means the oil isn't far behind. I loaded my truck with seaweed for the compost pile (stinky) and I'm going to get another load later in the week. 

Anybody else compost seaweed?

I just hope that a Hurricane doesn't flood my garden with oil this year.

PS: Just to clarify, I didn't take the pictures that I posted.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land
JAG wrote:

PS: Just to clarify, I didn't take the pictures that I posted.

Oh. I thought that was you in the picture on the beer glass. No?

Erik

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land
Erik T. wrote:

Oh. I thought that was you in the picture on the beer glass. No?

lol....its just a likening of my physical self. The tried to take a picture of me for the beer logo, but the camera lens kept bursting into flames for some reason. The artist who rendered the likening, now runs around mumbling "Diablo! Diablo!".

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

This is my very first time to post.  I must say I respect and enjoy all the colleagues that have enlightened me through this wonderful web site.  Though I may not be as enlightened as some of the very articulate, your posts have paved a wonderful way to follow.

I will say that I am closer to the Gulf Oil spil than I want to be.  I lost a very close friend that was killed while trying to prevent this horrific catastrophe.  He was on the rig rig floor the night the well "blew out."  To me, he was a hero and knew that his life and the life of his colleagues and the life of the Gulf of Mexico was partly in his hands that fateful night.  As with many who died, he did his duty in the most noblest of ways.  They are all heroes to me.

With that said, I repsond to V with a heavy heart and hope my closeness to the situation does not cloud any clarity I hope to acheive.

We are drilling in 5000' to as high as 8000' of water because major oil reservoirs of "new" discoveries are pretty much depleted.  The reign of "Cheap Peak Oil is Gone".  With that revelation comes the idea that "Deep Water Venues" pose many uncalculated risks to life and environment that we heretofore have not quantified.  And while we watch the circular firing squad that is otherwise a congressional hearing, we now know that oil prices will rise in the future and will rise precipitously.

Being close enough to the situation, we know that BP had officials on the rig the night before to celebrate, ironically, a 7 year safety record for the Transocean Horizon.  The drilling of the well was complete and completion of production operations were to commence sometime in the near future.  We have heard with some degree of certainty that BP was also going to announce, within 48 hours of  the ceasing of drilling, a "legacy" reservoir with the potential of 100 million barrels of refinable crude at 13,000 below the sea floor for a total well depth of 18,000'.  As a matter of note, most deep water oil wells exist below massive salt structures in water depths of greater than 6000' and reach a total well depth of 25,000' to 32,000'.  The technology to reach those depths are certainly "state of the art."

I know this does not answer your questions, but I do know that nearly everthing else is off limits to new drilling and certainly will be exacerbated by this catastrophe.  My livelihood for the last 31 years has been in the exploration industry and along the Lousiana Gulf Coast.  I am also one who believes in the sanctity of our wetland estuaries and the national need for energy reserves.  My state has just paid an enormous price for both.  However, I am willing to push on for the sake of my fellow countrymen to keep our energy resources in our hands.  That in and of itself is not a panacea.  However, the alternatives today are unacceptable.

If we stop Gulf of Mexico drilling AND production, we will see energy costs escalate beyond $150 per barrell and dollar values continue to erode.  The ultimate scenarios will play out in $6 per gallon gasoline or greater.  And to my good friends here, that is even before the Cap and Trade Legislation that is now hanging over all of our heads.

Thank you all for your concerns.  I only ask humbly to pray for our country, our leaders, and our environment. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

RP

Thanks for the post.

One question as with our virgin forests what happens not only when the last tree is cut down but what happens when the last drop of oil is put in a barrel?

I imagine at some point humans if any are left will take to sailing craft and try to find some protein in the sea. I hope it is stil there. I am making no judgments on you or anyone else. I am as much to blame as anyone...............I drive a car, I use all kinds of plastic things.

I will be long gone before the scale of this tragedy is known for certain. I believe we will lose the city of New Orleans as the wetlands which protect it are disappearing rapidly. There are over 25k miles of pipeline in those wetlands. They have been channeled and dredged. THey are the last line of defense against the next and future hurricanes.

We need the oil and we need a clean planet. We are damned if we do and damned if we don't.

What wew can do right now is support the people fighting for us. Waterkeepers is literally on the fronlines. They are volunteers they need our support and we owe it to the Gulf and ourselves. We are all part of the web of life

V

PS no further correction needed on depth of well. I used the depth of the well not the depth of the water. 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Roamingpoke,

What a fantastic first post! Thanks for taking the time to give us an inside perspective on this incident. I hope you will post more....Jeff

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

V

Thank you for the link to the web site.

I appreciate your thoughts.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land
roamingpoke wrote:

I am also one who believes in the sanctity of our wetland estuaries and the national need for energy reserves.  My state has just paid an enormous price for both.  However, I am willing to push on for the sake of my fellow countrymen to keep our energy resources in our hands.  That in and of itself is not a panacea.  However, the alternatives today are unacceptable.

Sounds so realistic and rational, at first.

We must continue the status quo because they haven't come up with a new status quo that's sufficiently coddling?  We don't want a status quo, if it means too few taking on too much.  Burned by that, we want a future for individuality and diverse life forms.  Reach and push must finally be in proper proportion and balance.  Using less energy helps us get there.

We're emigrating to the solar-powered biosphere because we want to participate in creation more than in markets.  Life is an adventure in relations, not a series of purchases.

David

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

I am not quite sure of the meaning of your post and forgive my naivete' if I missed your message. The following reply is not meant to discredit your belief or belittle your cause.

One thing I learned from Dr. Mortensen is " We can not expect the future to mirror the past."  He is right and on many levels because of the growth of populations and therefore the natural consumption of energy of all sorts.  With that said, the United States currently gets about 1% of its total energy grid from solar and wind.  Both sources are eco-friendly but are painfully cumbersome when looking at "net energy".

A 1000 mega-watt natural gas power generation station will consume a footprint of about 1500 acres.  The same generating capacity for a wind farm of that magnitude will consume about 75 square miles.  I think the NIMBY principle, i.e., "not in my back yard", necessarily applies here.  I would not want to intrude on the natural beauty of the land and put a wind farm in an area where you live. Especially if I want to expropriate the energy through wires to power my state.  In fact, there are about 1 million acres of the west now closed off because of the necessary existence of "oil derricks" that intrude on that beauty.

What I am hoping for is an excercise leading to practical, clean energy.  One source of bridging that gap to the future till technology catches up is Natural Gas.  It is plentiful and abundant, but the infrastructure is not in place to serve the motoring public therefore impractical.  But, it is a quality fuel that leaves a much smaller carbon foot print that  heavy hydrocarbons, like oil, have.  It will also create the sort of "green" jobs i would like to see.  There is no simple panacea for this crisis, and may I add, a cheap one.

If our energy future is to rely on a solar biosphere, then the net energy in terms of BTU's need to be greater.  Otherwise, I see an on going tax on consumers that transcend into government subsides to prop up these same green energies.  I do not want tthat either.  Spain tried a green economy and for every 1 green job that was created 2.2 "other" jobs were lost.  And Spain's carbon footprint actually went up, not down.  Now, Spain is also facing "sovereign" bankruptcy because the inputs into their economy exceeded their outputs.  Now, the upkeep is going to be their downfall.

The US cannot support nor sustain this type of economy on many levels.  And I fear that we will tilt in that direction until reasonable discussions ensue.  Did I hear you correctly, sir? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

RP

You raise some good points and you mention the good Doc. THe crash course mentions the three E's one of which is the environment. It is extremely difficult and has not been done by classical economists to calculate the environmental costs of our activity on the planet.

We are at a  point in history where it may be too late but necessary. I agree we are tied to hydrocarbons for the foreseeable future. Yet we are seEing and have seen incredible environmental destruction. Imagine if this plays out in the Gulf in a worst case scenario what the impact on all of life  and its cycles. A huge dead zone that once supplied untold benefits for this country.

You tout natural gas. That could create an even larger environmental disaster than what we are witnessing now.

As I said we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. We have crossed the Rubicon.

V

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land
roamingpoke wrote:

I am not quite sure of the meaning of your post and forgive my naivete' if I missed your message. The following reply is not meant to discredit your belief or belittle your cause.

...

The US cannot support nor sustain this type of economy on many levels.  And I fear that we will tilt in that direction until reasonable discussions ensue.  Did I hear you correctly, sir? 

You, sir, are gracious, informed and smart.  Thank you for joining in these discussions.

My objection was and is to your apparent resignation to, if not endorsement of, energy use as we've known it in the USA, because it discourages thinking about our purposes, in favor of simply carrying on.  Far too much ancient sunlight goes into feeding everyone.  Far too much ancient sunlight goes into the daily shuffle of private vehicles moving commuters from hearth to workplace to hearth.  Far too much ancient sunlight goes into what amounts to avoiding ordinary relations with neighbors (of multiple species).  Far too much ancient sunlight goes into provision of stuff that people don't expect to or even want to keep.  Far too much ancient sunlight goes into evolved abstractions that support nothing but the status quo.  As far as I can tell from your certainties about what can work, you're alright with all that, which constitute a trap in which people are unnecessarily sick/injured, unnecessarily out of shape, unnecessarily out of touch with people who matter, unnecessarily voiceless and unnecessarily hooked on dead things.

If we choose to leave the trap, how much energy will our society require?  It will be roughly the inverse of the energy, formerly known as zest, we discover in and among ourselves.

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Welcome, Roamingpoke!  Somehow, I think you're going to hold your own here just fine!

I'm so very sorry about the loss of your good friend on the rig.  That's hard!

-pinecarr

 

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land

Thank you for the kind words, sir. 

I think I might see your reasoning, now.  I do believe your vision is noble but may harbor on a utopic view that necessarily will require courage.  And while I believe that in a world without a clear vision the people will eventually perish, striving for that goal in our communities entails a fundamental paradigm change.  All of what you are saying could be attainable but would require a great deal of commitment on the part of individuals and communities.  We need that unfaltering commitment to have the capacity to achieve the noble vision that you so eloquently espouse.  Unfortunately, I do not think I possess the personal courage necessary to reach the apex of your vision though I believe it may one day be attainable.

Somehow it seems that interdependence within our environment is the operative phrase here.  We, as a people have not been very successful in finding common grounds for interdependance.  Arizona is a current yet classic case of that failure to acheive meaningful co-existence.

Perhaps you are right, sir.  I have resigned myself to the belief in the energy infrastructure as we know it in the USA; I know of no other sustainable way.  The current energy structure certainly requires enormous economies of scale and vertically integrated companies that work for profit.  That profit is eventually returned to the owners/shareholders vis a vis dividends, stock appreciation, and growth.  Unfortunately, growth at the expense of destroying the environment is a non-starter.  At the end of the day, the quest for cheap energy for a sustainable growth in our economy must not come at the expense of our ecosystem.  Until the price of hydrcarbons become exorbitant such that alternative energy sources become viable, we will continue to experience catastrophes and black swan events.

The energy model that I believe in is tied into the mantra Abundant Energy = Growth.  Growth means sustaining a world population soon to reach 6 billion.  While I appreciate the merits of your view, I am still bound by my own uncourageous paradigm.  Keep making the world better in your own community Mr. Deggleton and the peaceful interdepence we all strive for may one day reach my door.  That will be a grand day indeed!!

 

  

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Re: Gulf Oil Spill Reaches Land
pinecarr wrote:

Welcome, Roamingpoke!  Somehow, I think you're going to hold your own here just fine!

I'm so very sorry about the loss of your good friend on the rig.  That's hard!

-pinecarr

 

Thank you so much.  I appreciate your kind words.  

The news the media is reporting is correct.  The rig was just 12 hours away from moving off location.  The well was finished and cementing operation was ongoing when the downhole geopressures overcame the pressures holding the oil/gas in place.  Mother nature is graceful and yet sometimes vengeful.  May it all make us better from the learning.   

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