Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

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strabes's picture
strabes
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Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

As a perfect case study illustrating how our economic system feeds our psychology and spirituality, one of CSPER’s tenets, I thought I’d share what a Managing Director from Goldman, a classmate of mine from Harvard b-school, said after he saw one of my videos…

“I know I add value to my clients and to society at large and I am very comfortable with that.”

Of course claiming to “add value” is just repeating talking points from fraudulent Economics 101 he learned as a student (see the first 4 lessons of Renaissance 2.0 to revisit the flaws of the economics taught in colleges today). This is an example of how the “best and brightest” have no real ability to think independently, but simply a good ability to memorize what the system tells them as kids so they become its best servants (no surprise, the latter half of Lesson 6 pt 3 mentions how the system builds conformity in us, not free thinking).

Most of you know the truth about Goldman by now–a parasite that uses debt and its membership in the unconstitutional money cartel (lesson 1) to feed on the productive economy, what little of it exists anymore–so I won’t go into that. What I want to do here is show how this ties to his self-esteem (psychology) and sense of purpose in life (spirituality).

Psychology: He is “very comfortable” with his role at Goldman. You can imagine the level of internal disconnect he has with the real impact he and his firm have on the population–the fact that his huge paycheck comes from the indebtedness of the American people and being an inside cartel member. Not only does he have no intellectual understanding of it, but a big reason he doesn’t have an understanding is because he can’t psychologically afford to face the truth. He stays in the academic clouds believing he “adds value” because he can’t look for the truth without losing belief in his identity. It would be a psychological blow. The role we play in the economic system is inextricably tied to our psychology. So by avoiding the truth, he’s psychologically “very comfortable.” But this also means he’s psychologically narcissistic–narcissism is a dangerous disconnect from reality and truth.

Spirituality: He says he adds value to “society at large.” That’s the key. He reaches the realm of religion when he says that. It’s his raisson d’etre. He thinks he’s saving the world. Remember Goldman CEO Blankfein saying his firm does God’s work? Well, here’s one of his Managing Directors showing that he’s been fully baptized into the cult. This is the type of mentality necessary to fuel the catastrophic destruction of society we’ve witnessed. Your average low-rent criminal mentality would NOT be enough to fuel what the Wall Street cartel has done to the world over the last several years. It takes spirituality, a belief that you’re serving a higher purpose, warped though it may be, to pull that off.

So I hope this helps make the case for CSPER and explain why I connected the S P and E together. The connection is critical. The economic system defines what we spend most of our waking hours doing, which means it can’t help but be a primary determinant of our psychology and spirituality. So an economic system built on an immoral, unhealthy monetary system cannot help but breed immoral spirituality and unhealthy psychology over time. It must be changed.

http://csper.wordpress.com

ao's picture
ao
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Posts: 2220
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

So very true!  I have a nephew who's in with the Wall Street crowd and from the way he talks, you'd think they were God's gift to the economic systems and well being of the world.  It's gotten to the point where we've had a falling out and neither I nor my family wish to be in any form of contact with him.  In analyzing his behavior, it's very clear he has a classic case of narcissistic personality disorder.  Money is their God and all else be damned.  It's quite sick. 

Thomas Hedin's picture
Thomas Hedin
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Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

Money is their God and all else be damned.  It's quite sick.

+1

Once money becomes someone's god, there seems to be no end to greed.

Thomas Hedin's picture
Thomas Hedin
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Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

Strabes,

“I know I add value to my clients and to society at large and I am very comfortable with that.”

Would it be possible for you to get him to clarify exactly what kind of value he believes he adds to society?

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
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Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1443
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality
strabes wrote:

“I know I add value to my clients and to society at large and I am very comfortable with that.”

 

Psychology: He is “very comfortable” with his role at Goldman. You can imagine the level of internal disconnect he has with the real impact he and his firm have on the population–the fact that his huge paycheck comes from the indebtedness of the American people and being an inside cartel member. Not only does he have no intellectual understanding of it, but a big reason he doesn’t have an understanding is because he can’t psychologically afford to face the truth. He stays in the academic clouds believing he “adds value” because he can’t look for the truth without losing belief in his identity. It would be a psychological blow. The role we play in the economic system is inextricably tied to our psychology. So by avoiding the truth, he’s psychologically “very comfortable.” But this also means he’s psychologically narcissistic–narcissism is a dangerous disconnect from reality and truth.

I can understand his thinking very well!  It took me quite a while to go from being totally disconnected to the real world, to understanding that my job and the people I worked with (all of them) were part of the problem!  It's a tough thing to do when you're surrounded by narcissists at all times, that are not only condoning your behavior/profession, but cheering you on!  I mean seriously, how can anyone in their right mind even consider working against everything that your country is based upon?!?  And as you've so eloquently put it, these aren't dummy's.  They're some of the best and brightest minds.  But they've been indoctrinated into a secret society, that the masses could never understand.  And it's exactly that......a different society all together. 

I could go on and on, but my writing is horrible.  I can't really explain in writing the thought process that takes place when you're at your classmates place in life.  I sometimes get the chills and sweats at the same time thinking about some of the things I was able to justify.

Thanks for putting this together Strabes!  It really is awesome!

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
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Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

I forgot to mention, I have a lunch this Friday with a Sr. VP at JPM and an Sr. Admin. from the Treasury (ex. JPM VP).  It was scheduled for today but I had to change it for childcare reasons.  I'm going to take this post for them to read.  Should be interesting to hear their view of thingsInnocent.

Thank God it's not Sushi again!

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
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Posts: 1258
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

  Amen !    Are we allowed to say that here ?   Anyway    I have a self -esteem , self- puffed up neighbor  we would gladly encourage to move on to places that teach this crap  .( His own Island would be good . ) Oh and he is all knowing to boot !       Trade for one who is humble and selfless .    You know it is one thing to slip into this way of being once in  a while because we are all human ,but  oh my gosh these  are the most miserable people on the planet and want to make sure everyone else is too .

  Strabs , thank you for doing the homework and sharing .

FM

DrKrbyLuv's picture
DrKrbyLuv
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Posts: 1995
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

"The few who understand the system, will either be so interested from it's profits or so dependant on it's favors, that there will be no opposition from that class." — Rothschild Brothers of London, 1863

agitating prop's picture
agitating prop
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Posts: 854
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

The more intelligent, mentally agile an individual is, the easier for him to rationalize his actions, through belief.  Most people aren't necessarily motivated by truth seeking. They are seeking status. If they have an artistic bent, they seek an aesthetic experience. If they are in business they often see life as a kind of win or lose sport, a kind of Social Darwinism, that reduces life in all of it's complexities to a battle of sheer brute and competetive forces. Darwinism provided a certain context for English imperialism and has remained largely unchanged, unchallenged by the orthodoxy of biology and by extension, the modern uber capitalist world view.  Ironically, the theory of evolution, itself, has no evolutionary features.

So many academic "enlightened" individuals labor under incomplete theory, that radiates from scientific theories that are way past their best before date. When they extend them into the socio-political-economic sphere, unnecessarily cruel distortions appear.

We are potentially  far more cooperative than competetive. Our zeal to form partnerships, associations in an egalitarian miliu, trumps our desires to compete. This is what we are actually doing right now, online. We are facilitating cooperation in an enjoyable way. It is enjoyable partly because it capitalizes on our desire to participate, not necessarily dominate.

 

soulsurfersteph's picture
soulsurfersteph
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Posts: 204
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality

You want to change the psychology of people? Change the media. I am not one of those people who thinks everyone on TV sucks (I thought Lost was brilliant, I love House, and I have a few other shows I enjoy regularly). But we have a culture that gives Paris Hilton celebrity based on the fact that her daddy is rich. E! is a waste of a broadcast channel if I ever saw one. And why is it that every new show on Showtime or HBO has to be something involving something decadent? Oh look, let's start a show about a male prostitute and call it "Hung," aren't we so hip and clever?

A lot of people are mindless sheep. They will change directions if a good shepherd comes to lead them in the right direction. We need more positive leaders.

Furthermore, if enough people look down on investment bankers and Goldman Sachs employees, some of those who joined up for their ego-gratification will go elsewhere. They won't be doing out of the goodness of their hearts...they'll be doing it because they want to fit in, but who cares? We need to put our collective feet down and tell these narcissistic jerks that we're not going to glorify them or their shallow lifestyles or interests any longer. 

PS Love your CSPER website...look forward to seeing it grow and evolve.

ao's picture
ao
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Posts: 2220
Re: Goldman Sachs' Psychology and Spirituality
soulsurfersteph wrote:

I am not one of those people who thinks everyone on TV sucks (I thought Lost was brilliant, I love House, and I have a few other shows I enjoy regularly).

So House doesn't consistently dabble in decadence and titillation?  And Lost ... I won't even go there in terms of the sheeple phenomenon.  This statement seems at odds with the rest of your post.

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