Fuel Storage

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On Our Own's picture
On Our Own
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Posts: 72
Fuel Storage

I am sure this was covered before,  but would people be willing to refresh me?

 

I am struggling to make appropriate plans for fuel storage.  We have the capacity to store (ahem) alot of fuel.  But not gasoline.  As gasoline is volatile, both as in dangerous and more importantly it evaporates,  I am at a loss as to how to store a good amount.  I am not sure what constitutes a "good" amount anyway.

 

Thoughts and ideas??

On Our Own's picture
On Our Own
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Posts: 72
Re: Fuel Storage

This is the only thread I found on this,  and it has good info,  but I would like personal experiences,  please.

 

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/definitive-fuel-thread/16487

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
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Posts: 643
Re: Fuel Storage

So do you want storage information for Gas, or other fuels...

Since Gas is the only think mentioned, the I suspect this is what you mean.It's not terribly dangerous either, since you need a good air-fuel mix to burn it effectively, follow normal safety precautions and you'll be fine.

My rule of thumb is 3 months supply at hand. Take your current consumption from all non-vehicles for a month and multiply by 3 and for vehicles multiply by 1.5. Since this is emergency supply you're unlikely to be using as much gas in your vehicle when the pumps run dry.

Once you have that buy a Gasoline storage tank, we have Greer (Alaska, and Washington) then fill it up. If you're concerned about safety, bury it.

As far as Gas being volatile, if it's stored in a tank, and correctly vented then you're not going to lose a lot, the main problem is aging, which is a build up of gum and varnishes that are normally in solution in the Gasoline (and to a lesser degree evaporation of aromatics). Use a fuel stabilizer, and fill your gear (tools generators and cars) from the tank, then fill the tank, so you have a running supply of gas that's getting fresh gas added.

 

JAG's picture
JAG
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Posts: 2492
Re: Fuel Storage

I store about 80 gallons a year for hurricane season in separate 5-6 gallon plastic containers. Each winter I fill up the containers when gas is cheaper and also so I can get the "winter" grade. I add fuel stabilizer and store it in a shed in the far corner of my property. As hurricane season winds-down each fall, I begin using any unused gasoline reserves in the lawn mower, chipper, and vehicles. In January, I begin filling up the containers again for the next season.

If you keep the containers out of sunlight, and use a fuel stabilizer (which can get expensive), you should have no problems keeping gas for a year or more.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
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Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1148
Re: Fuel Storage

Being a farmer, we store diesel,sufficient to run the farm and generate a few hours of electricity each day for two years. this is rotated thru several tanks.

robie

yawl oughta get to know an old farmer,depression era, there are a few left

Great_White_Mudshark's picture
Great_White_Mudshark
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Posts: 10
Re: Fuel Storage

We own an outdoor power equipment dealership so deal with gasoline storage issues all the time. A high quality fuel stabilizer (we use Opti) added to the fuel immediately will keep it fresh for up to 2 years. The fuel must be kept in a sealed container. Fuel that is vented to air will go flat in 24 hours. Fresh fuel has lots of vapors emitting from the container, in 24 hours those vapors are gone. Ethanol content in fuel will also draw moisture from the atmosphere if the container is not sealed. Premium fuel has a higher octane rating and a lower ethanol content so is better for long term storage. There are lots of old wives tales regarding fuel.

jpitre's picture
jpitre
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Joined: Mar 3 2009
Posts: 366
Re: Fuel Storage

I like diesel equipment best - diesel seems to store for longer periods without problem. I typically buy 500 gallons on the farm once a year and it seems to last OK. Had some in an extra tank that sat around for a couple of years and didn't seem to cause problems in the engines.

Any other ideas on Diesel ?

Jim

Great_White_Mudshark's picture
Great_White_Mudshark
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Posts: 10
Re: Fuel Storage

Diesel can be a problem if there are wide temperature variations between your seasons. We can go from high 90's in the summer to close to -40 in winter. Diesel blended for summer use turns to a thick syrup in cold winter temperatures and will cause major engine problems.

Gasoline is also blended for the season in climates with large temperature differences. Winter gasoline has a higher concentration of components such as butane to increase the volatility of the fuel and aid cold temperature starting. If winter fuel is used in warm summer temperatures then the rapid vaporization of the fuel can cause vapor lock. Not a fatal problem but will cause engines to quit until the air bubbles in the fuel line disperse.

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
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Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: Fuel Storage

Yep diesel has that problem. Hell even "winter" diesel way before -40F will be gel without some serious anti-gelling agents. So you need to have your winterization running (with a tank heater), or set charcoal burners under your fuel tank AND oil pan, if you want that engine to run. Of course getting anything to run at those temps is problematic, even 2 strokes can have issues at below -35F (just ask my chainsaws).

 

 

nickbert's picture
nickbert
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Joined: Jan 14 2009
Posts: 1207
Re: Fuel Storage

Dealing with limited availability and high price of fuel is the area I feel most vulnerable in terms of preparedness.  My family rents an apartment so fuel storage of any significant amount is out of the question, and my family's vehicles all use gasoline.  In many ways I'd prefer diesel cars, but I have the same winter temperature concerns that Gungnir and Mudshark have already mentioned.  My work location is far away from my family, and despite the family having fuel-efficient cars I still rely heavily on gasoline availability to be home with the family on the weekends.  The best plan we've come up with in the meantime is keep a couple 5-gallon containers filled for emergencies (we use and refresh that supply every couple months), and always keep our gas tanks at least half full.  That way I will always at least have enough fuel to make it home in an emergency, and have a little left over for getting around for a week or so.  If we see any danger signs we're prepared to buy several more gas containers and fill them up, but at best that only buys a 2-3 weeks.  I'm planning to transition to a closer job in the mid-term future (I do not want to stay at my present job longer than that for reasons other than distance), but for the next year or two I'm very dependent on gasoline availability.

It would be nice to have more options, but you make do with what you can.  I expect the average joe is in the same situation as I am.  I figure this is the best we can do for now, but if anyone has any unique insights or suggestions I'm all ears and I'm sure others would be too Smile

- Nickbert

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