freeze dried food

30 posts / 0 new
Last post
strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
freeze dried food

Now that I think we're on the cusp of phase 2 of the collapse, the big one, I think this is now the last risk-free period to acquire food supplies to ensure we have them before commerce, shipping, banking, etc might be interrupted (I'm not saying the sky is falling tomorrow!  just saying it's still risk-free now...risk of delays increases once the collapse starts).  So I'm going the freeze-dried route.  

But now I can't find the vendor that seemed best...they were one of the ones recommended on this site and they had a nice 1-year package kit that looked like the most convenient option to me.   Can anybody point me to it?

Thanks.

strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: freeze dried food

also... the vendor I was looking at had real meat...not the TVP stuff.

 

cat233's picture
cat233
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 20 2008
Posts: 575
Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: freeze dried food

Hiya Strabes;

My favorite for freeze-dried is Emergency Essentials at beprepared.com.  Here's a link to their freeze dried products page:  http://beprepared.com/quickshoplist.asp_Q_c_E_950_A_name_E_Freeze%20Dried%20Foods%20In%20#10%20Cans

There's a little more variety for fruits here:  http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/

Here's my favorite powdered milk for storage:  http://grandmascountry.com/catalog/index.php?file=catalog&action=catalog_productinfo&uid=8519&pi_id=115400&clist=0,30895

These folks are good for staples:  http://www.bulkfoods.com/default.htm

Here's a solid bulk herb & spice source:  http://www.sfherb.com/

Hope this helps . . .

strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: freeze dried food

 excellent...thanks cat and cloud!

propamanda's picture
propamanda
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 17 2008
Posts: 61
Re: freeze dried food




If you want freeze dried food, these are a great deal -

I got a few of them from Costco's website.  You don't have to be a Costco member to buy from the website - you just pay a small surcharge if you're not (I think it was $15 or $20 total).  I haven't tried the food, but a bunch of people reviewed it and said it was decent.  It offers a nice variety of meals (all vegetarian, which was good for me) in a waterproof container with a 20 year shelf life.

 

Food For Health™
Emergency Food Kit

275 Servings
Weather Proof Bucket

Item # 104893

$84.99

Shipping & Handling included *

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11219554&whse=BC&topnav=&browse=&lang=en-US&s=1

 

 

 

Food For Health™
Deluxe Family
Emergency Supply Kit

Food, First Aid, & Essential Supplies
Enough Food For 4 People

Item # 401641

FireJack's picture
FireJack
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 8 2009
Posts: 156
Re: freeze dried food

Do they sell that costco stuff to canada too? Can it cross the border?  They don't seem to offer the food in a bucket on the canadian costco, just a 7 day ready to eat kit (at $124).

 Edit to add do they have decent emergency medical kits. What my family has now is pretty basic and it would be nice to have something if a hospital were unavailible.

 

strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: freeze dried food

 ok, so anybody know why we shouldn't just go with costco for like one tenth the price vs. the others (as I calculate it, 4 costco buckets would be a year supply with 3 meals/day)!?  is it garbage?

I'm a huge fan of Mountain House meals from my mountaineering so I'm willing to pay a premium for good tasting stuff, but a 10x premium is hardly worth it.   

 

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1443
Re: freeze dried food

The costco buckets are NOT good tasting in comparison.  In fact, I'd rather eat dog food;-)

Check out honeyvillegrain.com as well as be prepared.  Don't know where you're located but mredepot is a great source of long storage canned goods.

Now you do have this item at costco:  http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11487214&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|3605|77253&N=4032064&Mo=14&No=1&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=77253&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&topnav=

Which is new and it MAY be pretty good but it is TVP.  But if you're talking about this item:  http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11219554&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|3605|77253&N=4032064&Mo=14&No=9&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=77253&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&topnav=

It's nasty IMO.  Plus, the calories given per serving are quite low (100) so......take it with a grain of salt. 

Honeyville has this type of thing:  http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/freezedriedvegetablecombo.aspx in which you can use it at any time in soups, recipes. 

What I've done strabes is buy most of my vegi's, milk, eggs, fruits, rice, peas, beans, flour, all non meat items from honeyville.  They charge ONLY $4.95 for shipping EVERYTHING!!!!!  That's a HUGE savings.  Then I bought a grouping of Mountain House products like this:  http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_FN%20Q099_A_name_E_Provident%20Pantry®%20Freeze%20Dried%20Meat%20Combo

And this:  http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_FN%20Y425_A_name_E_Gourmet%20Year%20Supply  (I bought a smaller setup than this/actually 4 of them over a years period).  I've already used a couple of them for large parties in which I'll break out a can and make the whole thing up, keep it heated in a container and serve.  They taste outstanding! 

Then if you add some canned meats, cheeses, bacon, etc.....you have it all. 

IMO, the thing to remember is that you do have to eat this stuff.  And if you rotate like you're supposed to over time, you're more likely to eat food that tastes good than stuff that's just mediocre to BAD (in which I think that costco stuff does taste bad). 

Just my .02

 

cat233's picture
cat233
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 20 2008
Posts: 575
food storage, recomendations

There is always this method.  We finally have our groups totals for food, but have yet to set a date, order the food, or collect $$$s etc.

www.PeakProsperity.com/forum/food-storage-lessons-learned-and-recomendations/19518

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: freeze dried food

Hi Logan,

Sam Linder found the Costco stuff to be quite edible and, at that price, you can supplement it with other stuff. The Mountain House stuff has just as much sodium. As for taste in a crisis, I've been poor at times in my life and I can assure you, you will eat whatever is available. If you can afford the Mercedes of food now, go for it. If have to eat Yugo-level material to survive, no problemo for me. My wife is not on board anything here and I was able to only slip in a Costco can because my parents shipped it to me as a gift! I would buy 2 or 3 more if i can figure a way to get them here.

She doesn't know I've stashed canned turkey, tuna, power bars, atc., which are a lot easier to conceal than a year's supply of Mountain House.

JMHO.

 

SG

 

bklement's picture
bklement
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 26 2009
Posts: 108
Re: freeze dried food

Honeyville has 10% off your entire order from now until the 11th of the month.  Just use this coupon code    HONEY58

 

 

csstudent's picture
csstudent
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 22 2008
Posts: 48
Re: freeze dried food

 I've ordered my freeze dried from from either beprepared.com or thereadystore.com.  If you're looking for things like wheat or rice, I'd recommend ldscatalog.com.

beez123's picture
beez123
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 17 2009
Posts: 40
Re: freeze dried food

I went with Walton Feed for  a good 3 month supply for 2 people of basic things like rice, beans, oats, milk. Then we have stocked up about a 1 month supply of Mountain House pouches - for 2 people. We'd supplement the basic bulk foods with things from the garden and/or things that we hunt and fish for.

As far as the Mountain House pouches go, they'd be a luxury item, like a nice Friday evening meal out. And if nothing ever "hits the fan", or at least nothing hits the fan before the pouches start to expire in 2016/2017 - we'll just take them with us when we backpack. We alread use the MH meals for backpacking and have been very satisfied with the quality and taste. We buy them individually at Walmart for the cheapest prices I've seen. I might buy a big load from Nitropak online, just to get more variety of flavors than is available at Walmart.

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
On Freeze Dried Meal Burnout

 

Hi, folks;

With regard to the Mountain-House style, meal-in-a-pouch approach, I'd like to add this:  Being an avid backpacker, and having eaten my share of  freeze-dried meals, I must say that the concept is highly prone to culinary burn out.  By that, I mean that, after a week of eating pouchy meals, it gets to the point where I'd rather be chewing on tree bark.  Initially, they are quite tasty . . . and very welcome at the end of a hard hike . . . But after a few days, I really crave fresh foods . . . anything, really. 

There seems to be a basic repetition of ingredients, including herbs and spices, that work well with the freeze-dried meal concept, and for me, that leads to gustatory fatigue.  I've been known, on the trail, to scrounge just about anything fresh that I can nibble or make tea out of, even though my pack is loaded with freeze-dried chili con carne, fettucini alfredo, and the like.

I also suspect that our bodies, if they are not all gummed up with toxins, are quite good at knowing when we are deficient in certain nutrients, and will cause us to seek those nutrients.  Consequently, I suspect that, in some way that we cannot yet detect, freeze dried meals are not sufficient to support truly vibrant health.

I also suspect that MSG finds its way into a lot freeze-dried meals . . . It frequently masquerades as a constituent of "natural flavoring".  MSG works its "magic" of making food taste better by fooling our taste buds into perceiving a higher protein content, thereby making the food more enticing.  I sometimes wonder if, after so many of those meals, the ol' taste buds aren't fooled anymore, and the meals just don't taste that good anymore.

Don't misunderstand me . . . I have a hefty stock of freeze-dried foods . . . But I also have standard dehydrated foods, canned foods (both commercial and my own), frozen foods (from my garden), dried herbs and spices (commercial and my own), a variety of stored grains, "sproutable" seeds, and, most importantly, gardens, nonhybrid seeds, and I'm in the process of developing local sources of foods that I cannot grow on my little acre. 

I've stocked freeze-dried ingredients (not meals), for their light weight, and compact size.  But I intend to use them, if needed, in combination with frozen, canned, and fresh foods, as available.  I figure that the individual ingredients, not having "natural flavorings" are less likely to contain MSG, and that with skilled use of herbs and spices, I can whip up meals that are more enticing, and certainly more nutritious.

All of that having been said,  I think that freeze-dried meals have a place in one's bug-out bag, or disaster kit, as they are very fast to prepare, and indeed, palatable, in the short run.

FWIW

-- C1oudfire

 

 

propamanda's picture
propamanda
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 17 2008
Posts: 61
Re: freeze dried food

Sam Linder found the Costco stuff to be quite edible and, at that price, you can supplement it with other stuff. The Mountain House stuff has just as much sodium. As for taste in a crisis, I've been poor at times in my life and I can assure you, you will eat whatever is available.

I agree.  I went with a few of the Costco buckets because of the affordability and ease of storage (storage space is a bit of a problem in my home).  I honestly hope that I never have to use it, but if I do, it will be in a survival situation and I will be happy to have anything at all to eat.  The lack of meat doesn't bother me because I'm a vegetarian anyway (although I would eat whatever is available in a true crisis).  I think I have a pretty high tolerance for less-than-gourmet food, and most of these meals can be supplemented.  I also keep a lot of powdered milk on hand, which is fairly nutritious.  A few people on Costco's website did try them, and said they were OK.  For the price and ease of storage, I was willing to take the risk.

Besides, ALL preserved food, freeze dried or otherwise, is just a temporary solution.  In a really long, true crisis, you will have to find new sources of fresh food as you eventually run out of the stored stuff. 

 

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1443
Re: freeze dried food

Don't get me wrong, if I had nothing else I'd use the costco stuff.  But I guess I'm in a position to NOT use that and go for the Mercedes.  IMO, a little more spent and you will be happier in the long run.  And, might as well spend that funny money now on something that will be worthy in the future.

C1, I agree wholeheartedly!  I love the idea of sproutable vegi's/seeds.  I never thought in that direction but I saw a package in Sportsmans Guide last night that I may grab.  Great idea!  I also keep a good supply of canned vegi's, canned meats, canned spices, packaged dried spices from my new garden, and now a huge amount of recently canned carrots, tomatoes/sauce, beets, cabbage, etc....  On the canned meat side, I've done the beef, chicken, some tuna, pork, dehydrated pork chops, etc...

It's all a matter of space, how you want to live in the future crisis and what your plans are for later consumption.  I'm hoping that I don't have to live off of this stuff but if I have to I know I have over a years worth for a family of 4.  Also, I can continue to open this stuff and rotate into my normal diet because it does taste pretty good.  The costco stuff IMO isn't that sort of item.  It's for emergency use only. 

To each there own and if that's all you have then do it.  But if you want to be fully prepared I don't think that's the direction.  I do however think that one or two cans ON TOP of what I have can't hurt either. 

Cheers!

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
A "Layered" Food Storage System
LogansRun wrote:

Don't get me wrong, if I had nothing else I'd use the costco stuff.  But I guess I'm in a position to NOT use that and go for the Mercedes.  IMO, a little more spent and you will be happier in the long run.  And, might as well spend that funny money now on something that will be worthy in the future.

C1, I agree wholeheartedly!  I love the idea of sproutable vegi's/seeds.  I never thought in that direction but I saw a package in Sportsmans Guide last night that I may grab.  Great idea!  I also keep a good supply of canned vegi's, canned meats, canned spices, packaged dried spices from my new garden, and now a huge amount of recently canned carrots, tomatoes/sauce, beets, cabbage, etc....  On the canned meat side, I've done the beef, chicken, some tuna, pork, dehydrated pork chops, etc...

It's all a matter of space, how you want to live in the future crisis and what your plans are for later consumption.  I'm hoping that I don't have to live off of this stuff but if I have to I know I have over a years worth for a family of 4.  Also, I can continue to open this stuff and rotate into my normal diet because it does taste pretty good.  The costco stuff IMO isn't that sort of item.  It's for emergency use only. 

To each there own and if that's all you have then do it.  But if you want to be fully prepared I don't think that's the direction.  I do however think that one or two cans ON TOP of what I have can't hurt either. 

Cheers!

 

Hi, Logans Run;

Another advantage to sproutable seeds is that sprouts are extremely high in a wide variety of concentrated nutrients . . . And they can be produced in a few days, (or even in your pack or car, if you're on the run), unlike general produce, which takes weeks, a tilled garden (or at least large containers), and relatively warm weather to produce.  Under truly dire circumstances, sprouts can fill a serious gap in the fresh produce department.  They are also extremely compact, and store very well under nitrogen flush.  I also do an insect-kill with CO2 to prevent insect infestation from destroying my stash. In an emergency, many of the sproutable seeds can be used to plant a garden, as well. 

With regard to food storage rotation, I have a heirarchy of stored foods:  Some that are of such high quality (organic) that we eat from them, and rotate them, routinely; others that are good, but not organic, that we keep primarily for emergencies, but don't mind dipping into, as "filler" in an otherwise organic diet . . . by doing this, we can probably keep them slowly rotating through.  Another possibility for our less-than-ideal foods is that we can always use them to feed others who have not prepared, if we are able to feed ourselves out of our organic garden and local organic growers, or we can use them to expand the number of people that we can feed out of our garden. 

Part of my reason for having such a wide variety of storable food types is that it is impossible to tell, here and now, just how tough it's going to get, whether we'll have to be on the run, how many I'll have to feed, and how long the "famine" will last.  If it doesn't get too bad, for too long, I'll be glad that I have truly palatable, healthy foods . . . On the other hand, if it lasts the biblical three and a half years, I'll be glad that I popped for a large volume of compact, but less palatable, less-than-pure foods.  I guess that what I've done is to create a "layered" approach, so that, in all eventualities, I'll be at least minimally prepared. 

-- C1oudfire

 

BTW, Logan's Run; have you tried the dehydrated pork chops?  How are they? 

 

VeganDB12's picture
VeganDB12
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 731
Re:sprouts-any problems with alfalfa?

Hi C1oudfire and all

I have been storing lots of sprout seeds and have appreciated your suggestions regarding dealing with the storage issue and making things palatable.  Very helpful.

Have you had any trouble with alfalfa sprouts? I read recently that there is still a Salmonella contamination issue with some of them.  I think other sprouts are pretty safe.  What kind of Sprouts do people like or recommend?

I have a wide variety of sprouts and a sprout thingy to grow them that I have to practice using before it is "needed".

Regards

Denise

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re:sprouts-any problems with alfalfa?
Denise wrote:

Hi C1oudfire and all

I have been storing lots of sprout seeds and have appreciated your suggestions regarding dealing with the storage issue and making things palatable.  Very helpful.

Have you had any trouble with alfalfa sprouts? I read recently that there is still a Salmonella contamination issue with some of them.  I think other sprouts are pretty safe.  What kind of Sprouts do people like or recommend?

I have a wide variety of sprouts and a sprout thingy to grow them that I have to practice using before it is "needed".

Regards

Denise

You know, Denise, I hadn't considered the alfalfa sprout/salmonella thing . . . But, I think that's a phenomenon associated with the warm/moist environment that packaged sprouts are sold in, combined with bacterial innoculation from imperfect sanitation practices . . . I'm guessing that you wouldn't have any problem with properly matured, dried seeds stored under dry, anaerobic conditions, then properly sprouted (with the requisite periodic rinsing), and properly stored, or promptly eaten . . . But that's really just an educated guess, on my part.

-- C1oudfire

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: freeze dried food

Hi, folk;

Another tip for those who are storing a la carte ingredients, rather than prepackaged meals:  Bouillon is a real boon for beefing up (pun intended) a dish of rice (or other grains) and veggies.  I favor Bill's Best Beaf and Bill's Best Chick'nish, which are powders that conveniently come in large jars (maybe about a gallon, as I recall -- I've repackaged mine for long-term storage).  These are very tasty, have no MSG (though possibly a bit of GMO soy).  They are both very tasty and vegan, and have good nutritional value d/t nutritional yeast being used as a "carrier"/"filler".  These are really so tasty that we use them routinely, especially when we're in a hurry to put on a hot, nutritious meal. 

Last night, for instance, I cooked a 1/2 cup of rice with 2 cups water, just a pat of butter and a tblsp of Bill's Best Beaf.  Then I stir-fried whatever I had on hand from the garden (an orange bell pepper, zucchini, brussels sprouts) with a bit of onion and garlic.  Then I tossed in some lemon basil, pineapple sage, and oregano, at the last second.  All got tossed together, before serving.  Two pots/pans, one dish.  For boosted (and more complete) protein, I could have added beans (longer time to soak/cook) or added meat to the stir fry.  All spontaneous, very flexible, (depending on the fresh ingredients that are available), little effort (maybe 15 minutes of prep, followed by 35-40 minutes of answering email while the rice simmered) and delicious.  There is no reason why this kind of meal cannot accommodate dehydrated (and reconstituted) veggies and herbs, partly, or in full, as needed. 

The other advantage to storing ingredients, rather than meals, is that you can tailor your stored food to individual needs and tastes.  Low sodium diet?  . . . Not a problem . . . . Just use more herbs . . . . Vegan? . . . . . Add more bouillon and cayenne pepper (heat is a good substitute for savory meats, flavor-wise)  . . . . Allergies?  . . . . Don't stock the offending foods . . . . Also, if you stock ingredients, rather than meals, you'll be less likely to unintentionally ingest an allergen.

Of course, all of this requires some [very basic] cooking skills . . . But if you're committed to sustainable living, you're going to have to learn that, anyway . . . And home-cooked is always tastier and more nutritious, in any case.

FWIW

-- C1oudfire

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2237
Re: questions

Hey C1oudfire, do you know any good books/resources about sproutable seeds? That sounds like a great idea in regards to "quick produce" if the need arose.

Also, i don't know if this has been answered elsewhere, but do any of you folks who store freeze-dried food worry about mice or other vermin getting into it?  Someone I know who raises livestock said they keep feed in metal containers to keep the varmints out.   I'm wondering if I am foolish not to be doing this, leaving freeze-dried food in original packaging it was shipped to us in.  Any thoughts or experience on this?

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Sprout Resources
pinecarr wrote:

Hey C1oudfire, do you know any good books/resources about sproutable seeds? That sounds like a great idea in regards to "quick produce" if the need arose.

Also, i don't know if this has been answered elsewhere, but do any of you folks who store freeze-dried food worry about mice or other vermin getting into it?  Someone I know who raises livestock said they keep feed in metal containers to keep the varmints out.   I'm wondering if I am foolish not to be doing this, leaving freeze-dried food in original packaging it was shipped to us in.  Any thoughts or experience on this?

Hi, Pinecarr;

Here's the best site for sprouting info, and lots of good sprouting peripherals, too:  http://www.sproutpeople.com/.

This is also a good resource:  http://www.sproutman.com/.  They have lots of books (but you can get all the info you need, for free, at the Sprout People site).  Sproutman's Sprout Chart:  http://sproutman.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=11 is a handy little ditty to have around the kitchen.

Also, I would definitely store all freeze dried and dehydrated food in metal, or at least the heavy 5 gallon buckets.  Plastic or foil-type packaging is definitely not going to be enough. 

Hope this helps. 

-- C1oudfire

 

VeganDB12's picture
VeganDB12
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 731
Re: freeze dried food

Thank you as always C1oudfire.  Anaerobic storage should take care of it, those oxygen absorbers are in the packs if I recall correctly.  Sounds like a very well educated guess!  I heard about the Salmonella thing from Dr. Greger's last vegan nutrition DVD but I think anaerobic storage would kill most buggies.

Where can you get the vegan boullion? do you order online?

Sorry for so many questions, it is not often I can get tips on good vegan long term storage products. Thank you.

Denise

strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: freeze dried food

 do the #10 cans the freeze dried stuff comes in count as metal storage?  I assume they don't need anymore protection.

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 4 2009
Posts: 2606
Re: freeze dried food
strabes wrote:

 do the #10 cans the freeze dried stuff comes in count as metal storage?  I assume they don't need anymore protection.

Hey strabes -

The #10s should do it but if you want peace of mind you could always repackage in mylar bags.  Put an O2 absorber in the bottom, a dessicant pack in the middle and another O2 absorber at the top.  Squeeze as much air out as possible and then heat seal the bag shut with an iron.  Seal the edges as close to the top as possible to facilitate resealing if you need to open the bag but aren't going to use it all right away.

This was discussed at length at Lowesville - Chris and Becca did it this way with their neighbors and it's what we did with our group of 12 families here in Va.  I have more details on weights and measures for each type of grain or bean too.  Pretty sure that was posted earlier - I will try to dig up the link to the thread.

This obviously is more planning than freeze dried, but we look at it as an insurance policy.  Once it's done, it's on the shelf and done and you have peace of mind for 10-15 years.

Everything can go into a 5 gallon food grade plastic bucket - get HDPE not LDPE.  The interstitial spaces in the molecular structure of LDPE will allow air and other gases to get into the bucket.  Not a big deal if you have a good seal on the mylar bag inside.

You can order food grade buckets, lids and gamma seal lids from:

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=usplastic&category%5Fname=20327&product%5Fid=9715&

Lots of good resource info here:

http://www.storefood.com/self/upack/index.htm

http://www.yourfoodstorage.com/?gclid=CIGazICItZoCFSCF7QodVguZcw

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/emergency_supplies/mylar_food_storage_bags.htm

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/Extend_Shelf_Life.html

www.PeakProsperity.com/forum/definitive-lowesville-seminar-thread/17632#comment-35350

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2237
Re: Sprout Resources

Thanks for the info, C1oudfire!  I would be sick if, after all that preparation and expense, I lost my back-up supplies to mice or whatever!

VeganDB12's picture
VeganDB12
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 731
Re: freeze dried food

C1oudfire

Those sprout sites area great.  One of them reports the problem with alfalfa has to do with "scarification" of the seeds which they don't do to their alfalfa.  I am sprouting alfalfa seeds now and getting a bumper crop in 5 days.  The seeds have been hanging around a few years. My brother gave them to me with a bug out bag and a vegetarian MRE  (trying to drop a hint I guess).  Thank you all for the suggestions.

link54's picture
link54
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 8 2009
Posts: 44
Re: freeze dried food

I am just getting started in my food stock piling effort and I am grateful for all of your freeze dried food information, tips and suppliers posted in this thread.  But In phase one of my stockpiling I just acquired a large chest freezer off Craigs List and want to fill it properly. 

The problem is I have no experience in what you can freeze,how best to freeze food and how long you can freeze certain things.  I was wondereing if there is a book or website that one of you might be able to suggest so I can come up to speed quickly and get on to phase two (Freeze Dried Food)

I do realize that the future very well could have interuption(s) or the complete absence of electricity and therfore freeze dried supplies is next on my prepareness list to get started on in two weeks.  But first I need to get phase one done quickly so any help would be greatly appreciated. 

Thanks  Michael

 

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: freeze dried food-length of time

I'm not expert on how to freeze  food but www.stilltasty.com will tell you how long foods stay ok.

 

SG

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments