Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both flawed!

120 posts / 0 new
Last post
capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both flawed!

I'm trying to decide (quickly, LOL) on the best 3 month food storage for spouse and myself. Some type of prepared foods will be the best route for me. Spouse cannot eat "wheat, rice, beans" program and my reading of anecdotal reports suggests that many people have a hard time with this "diet" anyway. Most of us don't eat this way daily and, for many, digestive systems are not happy with it. My problem is that both the dehydrated and freeze dried foods that I find all have unacceptable amounts of sodium, not only bad for hypertension, but also increasing water needs following the meals. One major freezedried food purveyor told me they were developing a "low sodium" version but it turned out they were only trying to get under 1000 mg/serving...still a large amount of salt. Have any of you solved this dilemma?

 

SG

Farmer Brown's picture
Farmer Brown
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 23 2008
Posts: 1503
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

capesurvivor,

I suggest you get used to rice and beans.  They're easy to store, have good amounts of carbs and protein, and if you grow some peppers, onons, and parsley, they should be tasty enough to live off for at least three months.  Your digestive system will adjust after the first or second week.  

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Patrick...there is a 50/50 chance my wife would starve to death before eating those. No kidding.

 And don't say that that would double my food reserve!

 

SG

 

 

stpaulmercantile's picture
stpaulmercantile
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 19 2008
Posts: 87
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

If you're only trying to store food for 3 months, why not just buy canned foods?  Soups, beef stew, vegetables, fruits, beans, etc.  Stated shelf life of those items is 2 years, and if stored in a cool environment, they will last many more years.

#1 rule of food storage is to store what you eat and eat what you store.  And yes, start getting more beans and rice worked into your diet now, so you can adjust your diet over time. 

Pandabonium's picture
Pandabonium
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 30 2008
Posts: 87
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

What will you eat when the stored food runs out?  At least with rice and beans in storage you could stretch your money to cover many more months and give your wife at least a 50/50 chance of survival. Or have your freeze dried or deydrated foods, but also some rice and beans, and try to gradually introduce them into the diet.  

 I eat rice and beans all the time (we don't eat fowl or beef in our house).  The trick is to make tasty dishes with them, not eat them plain.   From dried beans and peas and such  I make my own chili, refried beans, split pea soups, southern style dishes withblack beans, curries, and on and on.  Add some basmatti rice in your stores for a different flavor now and then.  We also use dried beans for sprouts which is a good way to get some greens in the winter.   Food shouldn't be dull and even with just the basics it doesn't have to be.  

If you are determined to stick with either dehydrated or freeze dried food, I would strongly recommend buying a small amount and tasting it.  Several years ago I decided to stock some freeze dried food for  short term situations  and bought samples from four leading companies.  Some of it was simply inedible in my opinion.   So sample and taste first.  As for sodium, if this is just to be a 3 months supply of food, don't worry too much about it.

Bon appetit and best wishes.

foodstr2's picture
foodstr2
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 1
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

We regularly get this type of question.  While I appreciate food sensitivities, my usual reply is, "You're storing food for SURVIVAL in troubled times.  Your choice will be either to eat foods with chemicals/wheat/soy/GMO--or whatever you're adverse to--or to STARVE to death."

What do you think you'll do then?  Starve to death in perfect health, or live on with a runny nose??

It never ceases to amaze me how dumbed-down Americans have become!

Bruce Hopkins
Best Prices Storable Foods
http://www.internet-grocer.net/product.html

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

An MI in my living room is not survival. Crap food is crap food. I'm, personally, not sensitive to anything but crap. If food purveyors really cared about their products, they 'd let us season/salt them. Bland is better than [email protected]#t.

Not helpful and snide, IMHO.We try not to insult each other here, newbie.

 

SG

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

 

SG;

I have found the best way to cook for health, under both normal and survival conditions, is to start with simple, whole food ingredients.  Yes MRE's have lots of sodium.  But if you buy the constituents (dried or freeze-dried potatoes, veggies, meats, and grains/rice/beans, as tolerated), as well as a comprehensive supply or ongoing garden of herbs and spices, you can season your meals according to your tastes and tolerances.  In addition to being more flexible, this is also a less expensive approach than MRE's.

Another option is to buy and store dried/freeze dried staples, such as meats and grains, and supplement them with crops you can grow and can reliably in your USDA zone. 

In short, I have found that I was not able to put together an adequate food storage program from only one of the available categories.  Our program is made up of a combination of dried, freeze dried, bulk grains and beans, sprouting seeds, canned foods, as well as a large stash of nonhybrid vegetable seeds.  The way I view it, this spreads out the risks and disadvantages among the various forms, so that we won't suffer a total loss of food supply if there are problems with contaminants, shelf life, or compatibility with our immune systems. 

Hope this helps.  Smile

Linda

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Thanks, Linda,

Some good thoughts. I was trying to take the quick-and-dirty way out of ordering stuff, hoping to find optimal wares. You may have the best way, though most of my searches for elemental foodstuffs in those categories did not thrill me either.

Jeez, all I want is low sodium food and I can't grow it all myself.

 

SG

cat233's picture
cat233
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 20 2008
Posts: 575
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

SG... LOL, at times we can't win, can we???  I feel your pain. Laughing

Linda thank you for your suggestions.

Cat

 

 

 

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

 

SG;

What part of the world do you live in?  US?  What state?

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

MA, aka Taxachusetts.

 

Hi Cat223!

 

SG

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

 

SG;

You might try looking for an organic foods wholesaler in your area.  They will sometimes deliver to residences now, especially with their sales to health food stores being curtailed with the economic downturn.  You'll have to do your own packing on bulk grains and the like, but you also may be able to get healthy canned goods at an affordable price.

 

Linda Low

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Thanks, Linda,

Will do.

SG

VictoriaPandora's picture
VictoriaPandora
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 11 2009
Posts: 9
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

CS, I have a dehydrator here that I got as a gift. I don't think it was very expensive though. I admit I haven't used it for anything yet other than the trays are great for bean-sprouting! I've read up a bit about dehydrating though and as far as I know most things don't call for salt at all.

Are you mostly talking about dehydrating meat?

For storage, well we have a little "dent and bang" grocer a few miles away. Brand name soups and such for 90 cents instead of three dollars something. I was able to get  pretty close to three months worth of food for just about a hundred dollars. Mostly canned goods. Unfortunately lots of salt in most of them, but for canned veggies and even canned whole beans rinsing them helps remove a lot of it.

 

You'll find some handy tips at this link also.

 

http://sharonastyk.com/2007/07/12/low-energy-food-preservation/

Low Energy Food Preservation

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

CS - my husband and I have food allergies and food intolerances. The intolerances we'll have to live with if we store long term, but the allergies would kill us quickly (i.e. an anti-survival tactic!).  We've been reading labels as well and noticed, like you that the sodium levels are high in a lot of the prepared meals. We also noted that this seems to be worse for meat dishes... so we started dehydrating and vacuum sealing our own meats instead. It would be great like if there were a custom freeze-dry company here in the US (but, hey, there's on in NZ!).

Septimus's picture
Septimus
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 19 2008
Posts: 200
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Here's a basic question:

Can the dried beans bought in the typical grocery store be  sprouted? (Such aspinto, lima,black, etc.)

Thanks,

Bruce

 

 

jerrydon10's picture
jerrydon10
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 442
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Buy what you like to eat.

My pantry is stocked with cans of veggies: white, pinto, green and baked beans; stewed and diced tomatoes, tomato sauce and paste; corn, kraut, potatoes, soups, all kinds of fruit, peanut butter etc. I also stock canned corned beef, spam, roast beef in gravy (bought at Walmart and tastes good!) canned chicken and tuna fish. I have also bought the canned prepared foods I like: ravioli, canned spaghetti with meatballs, chili,,,,,,,,and canned pies fillings, apple, cherry, etc.

Canned bacon, cheese, sausage and powdered eggs and milk (for cereal) are coming..

There are three of the large jars of dairy creamer for cooking cream based dishes. Also rice, dried pastas, flour, and corn meal in bulk.

Grains such as the latter can be stored by placing them in large jars,
having placed a chunk of dry ice on the bottom and letting it melt,
then by sealing the jar. As the dry ice sublimates it replaces the
oxygen in the container with CO2 which critters can't stand.

Also several boxes of dehydrated potatoes (scalloped potatoes). Place them in boiling water and they will rehydrate, then cook them anyway you want. I fry them up for breakfast hash browns and love them. Tricky at first, but you'll get the hang of it.

I also stock chicken and beef base  (a paste that lasts a long time for meat flavoring. You can get those bases in vegetable and clam as well. Heck, thoses bases are what the commercial restaraunts use on a daily basis. When it comes to meats I think we will have to become more like the Asians--meat is for flavoring.

Even though I live in the city, planters will be going in on my back terrace this spring for planting greens and fresh spices.

If you stock what you like, then begin to eat it and replace with the same thing but rotate the stock by eating the oldest first this gives you a several month stock in reserve.

Also, don't forget to stock up on toilet paper.....*wink*

Finally, yes dried beans bought at the supermarket will sprout in nothing more than a paper towel kept moist.

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Thanks, folks, all helpful posts.

 

SG

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...
Septimus wrote:

Here's a basic question:

Can the dried beans bought in the typical grocery store be  sprouted? (Such aspinto, lima,black, etc.)

Thanks,

Bruce

 

 

Yes they could if they weren't pasteurized and haven't been stored in the wrong conditions long enough to make the seed non-viable. However, my preliminary trials sprouting dried beans were disappointing... I had a germination rate less than 5%.

pamcake20's picture
pamcake20
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 1
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

I totally agree, Rule #1= eat what you store!

I would always buy gross food and store it and it just goes to waste. Then I found a company called Shelf Reliance. They have dried foods that are SO GOOD!! You guys should look at their website (shelfreliance.com) because they have tons of products that taste amazing and have long shelf-life time.

Its great because I keep my food storage fresh by using it to cook! Nothing goes to waste anymore and they even have other things like food storage shelves and emergency survival kits! Go check it out!!

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2367
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Would you... by chance be in their employee?

No offense, but that's a HORRIBLE way to make your entrance. Your first post should probably have been in the "Reader Survey" thread. File that away for the next time you post only to peddle wares.

Note the method of StPaulMercantile, who links to his products in the course of casual conversation.  

CapeSurvivor, To your question... have you tried oats, barley or corn?

All of those can be dehydrated and reconstituted, and I imagine they have less salt, through possibly more starch. Not really my field of study. heh. If you're looking for a way to essentially "only" eat fresh... well, the only options are to either buy it, or find someone who can supply it.

With regards to dying before eating it... I think the old adage "Hunger is the best spice" fits nicely.

Cheers!

Aaron

SkylightMT's picture
SkylightMT
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 30 2008
Posts: 125
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...
Septimus wrote:

Here's a basic question:

Can the dried beans bought in the typical grocery store be  sprouted? (Such aspinto, lima,black, etc.)

Thanks,

Bruce

 

 

Lentils are probably the best for sprouting, and do so quite readily. Plus, as sprouts, they are a complete protein, while as beans alone they are not. Here's an easy method:

Rinse several times, soak beans in warm water for about 8 hours.

Rinse again, wrap in a wet towel, let sit overnight. Most will have sprouted by the morning.

Rinse twice daily, keep in wet towel; they're ready to eat within 48 hours.

http://onehotstove.blogspot.com/2005/06/primer-on-sprouting-lentils.html

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 4 2009
Posts: 2606
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...
capesurvivor wrote:

I'm trying to decide (quickly, LOL) on the best 3 month food storage for spouse and myself. Some type of prepared foods will be the best route for me. Spouse cannot eat "wheat, rice, beans" program and my reading of anecdotal reports suggests that many people have a hard time with this "diet" anyway. Most of us don't eat this way daily and, for many, digestive systems are not happy with it. My problem is that both the dehydrated and freeze dried foods that I find all have unacceptable amounts of sodium, not only bad for hypertension, but also increasing water needs following the meals. One major freezedried food purveyor told me they were developing a "low sodium" version but it turned out they were only trying to get under 1000 mg/serving...still a large amount of salt. Have any of you solved this dilemma?

 

SG

SG -

Check this link - Cat and I have ordered from them (their employees aren't surly and insulting).  You'll have to do a little label reading to figure out sodium content.

http://beprepared.com/category.asp_Q_c_E_60_A_name_E_Food%20Storage%20-%20Freeze%20Dried%20Foods

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

Thanks again for all advice..oats are a good thought, She eats oats (no, she does not have 4 legs!).

I will check out shelf reliance; have looked at beprepared, unfortunately their stuff is as salty as rest but will recheck to be sure.

 Sometimes there's just no quick and dirty way. Maybe I should start a "healthy" freezedried food business catering to organic or hypertensive survivalists. Could call it "youseasonit.com.

 

SG

jerrydon10's picture
jerrydon10
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 442
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

I have a salt problem too. Blood pressure is creeping up in my mid-fifties. My girlfriend constantly scans the supermarket shelves for low sodium products and there are a ton of good canned ones out there now for our type.

Another problem is that food is so bland for me without salt that I don't enjoy it. I make my own substitute: potassium cloride, L-lysine; I then add 25% sea salt. Tastes great and doesn't seem to affect my BP.

Be sure and carry my product when you open your food business.....:-)

EndGamePlayer's picture
EndGamePlayer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 2 2008
Posts: 546
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

I saw a refrigerator turned into a solar/wood food dryer on MyBackAchers.com

They are also storing the dried food in home-made ice houses for keeping longer on the shelf since home-made dried food doesn't have gasses  to preserve it or excess salts.

But, fresh is best!

 EndGamePlayer

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...
jerrydon10 wrote:

I have a salt problem too. Blood pressure is creeping up in my mid-fifties. My girlfriend constantly scans the supermarket shelves for low sodium products and there are a ton of good canned ones out there now for our type.

Another problem is that food is so bland for me without salt that I don't enjoy it. I make my own substitute: potassium cloride, L-lysine; I then add 25% sea salt. Tastes great and doesn't seem to affect my BP.

Be sure and carry my product when you open your food business.....:-)

Yes, Potassium Chloride (still a salt) and Sea Salt (a combination of chlorides) seem to have less impact on your BP than Sodium Chloride (normal table salt). I often use the minimum amount of KCl/NaCl blend when I can veggies and cure meats rather than using pure NaCl. Of course, you have to be careful not to overdo KCl just like NaCl, because it can cause other health problems.  Everything in moderation :) 

It took me a while to slowly retrain my taste buds to less seasonings, but now I find that I enjoy and appreciate the flavors and subtleties of the actual food now than I'm not just tasting the spices I put into it. Having fresh, organic food really makes a difference in that regard... you can really tell the difference of flavors between two varieties when you picked them out of the garden a few minutes ago.

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: Food Storage Dilemmas-Freezedried Vs. Dehydrated-both ...

In addition to drying, I also throw one of those dessicant pouches in before I vacuum-bag the food. Keeping anything dried and sealed this way in a cool/cold dark place greatly increased their storage time. Keeping them in the freezer until the electricity runs out could probably extend their life even more.

Another thing with meat, and meat dishes, that works well is to can them with a steam pressure canner. The high temps kill off the anaerobic microbes and the vacuum kills off the aerobic microbes, so you don't need to add any/as much salt, acid or other preservatives to keep things safe to eat.  Unfortunately, metal can canners on the consumer market are only water bath canners so you need salt, acid or preservatives to make low-acid foods like meats and dairy shelf-stable. Otherwise you're talking about a lot of glass jars, which can break during storage and transport, etc.

Maybe you could start a business freeze-drying and metal pressure canning a whole bunch of foods in their pure form, or at least with less sodium, additives and artificial preservatives. I'm sure people with food sensitivites would be very very happy to find someone who did this... it's nearly impossible to find gluten-free, additive-free, low sodium, non-Texturized Soy Protein, etc grocery store items, much less survival rations!

stpaulmercantile's picture
stpaulmercantile
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 19 2008
Posts: 87
Store What You Eat --- Eat What You Store

I want to reiterate and expound a little on what I said way up at the top.

STORE WHAT YOU EAT, AND EAT WHAT YOU STORE.

I speak with a bit of experience here.  Along with my other survival products, I sold long-term storage food (year supply, month supply, individual cans of dehydrated fruits and vegetables, etc.) for almost two years - I sold about $500k of the stuff.  I've talked to hundreds of customers about it, I've been to many preparedness shows where I sold products, and I have read just about every opinion about the subject, so am aware of all the arguments.

If you think that you will continue to eat MacDonalds every day for breakfast, eat at the company cafeteria at lunch, then go home and have beef, mashed potatoes and green beans . . . . then, when TSHTF, suddenly switch to dry beans and rice and canned tomato powder and dehydrated peas, you will have a very tough transition. 

I don't recall what year it was, but the USA parachuted pallets of MRE's into a country where people were starving.  The starving people had primarily been on rice/bean/flour(bread) diets.  The MREs (by the way, MRE is Meal Ready to Eat) were wonderful dishes like noodles with meat filling and zesty tomato sauce, crappy meatloaf with gravy and instant mashed potatoes, etc.  News crews recorded the starving people running toward the boxes, taking them away, then turning their noses up with disgust.  Many people would not eat them even though they were starving and threw them to the ground.  Many ate them and vomited because the food was so foreign to them they couldn't digest it. 

So don't assume that you can just change your diet over night from fast foods and store-bought foods to rice/beans and dehydrated foods.  They DO have their place, but this is something you need to start working into your diet NOW, gradually, to find what you can stomach and what you can't.  I don't know how many people bought cases of TVP (textured vegetable protein) in such marvelous flavors as beef, chicken, chile, etc., then threw it away after they tried to eat it.  It is an acquired taste, for sure, and yes, I think many people would choose to starve rather than eat it.

Since I sold the stuff, we sampled a lot of it.  The dehydrated fruits are marvelous, especially banana chips and dried apples.  There are also several flavors of dehydrated apple flakes that have MANY uses - they are great for snacking, adding to cereals, muffins, breads, etc.  At the shows, the kids would keep coming back to my booth for the apple flakes.  Most of the soup mixes are pretty good and the ABC Soup Mix (tiny alphabet noodles mixed with split peas) was a big surprise - it was great when flavored with some bouillon and salt/pepper.  Add a little chopped chicken or beef and it's a great, filling and nutritious meal.

After Y2K, most of the companies who manufactured long-term storage food went out of business.  The best place to buy has always been Walton Feed:

www.waltonfeed.com

You can download their PDF catalog.  They have the best prices, largest selection, and many products are available in #10 cans as well as 5-gallon buckets and even 25-lb bags.  The buckets and cans are packaged with oxygen adsorbers to increase shelf life.  By the way, I am not affiliated with Walton Feed in any way, other than the fact that they may someday carry my kerosene cook stoves - not yet, though. 

But if dried and dehydrated foods is the route you choose to go, you MUST start incorporating these foods into your diets now, then use and rotate and restock what you like.  I have trouble adapting to many of these foods, which is why I stock lots of canned meats, soups, vegetables, fruits, etc.  in addition to rice, beans, noodles, sugar, flour, spices, etc.  Canned foods from the grocery store typically are stamped with about a 2-year lifespan.  The actual lifespan can be much longer than that, especially if you keep them in a cool place.  Lifespans assume a storage temp of 70 degrees and the maintaining of a certain percentage of the nutritional value on the label.  If you keep a can for 5 years, it doesn't mean that it will be spoiled, necessarily, but its nutritional value will have deteriorated somewhat.  If you have a 60-degree corner in the basement, that will almost double the storage life of anything you put there.

Changing eating patterns is tough.  I am very accustomed to running into town for breakfast many days a week.  I like fast food and we eat a lot of processed foods.  But our family preparedness plan has goals for 2009 that include many more meals each week that will be made from foods stored in the basement - including cans from the store, canned meats I've purchased, plus long-term storage cans of rice, beans, fruits, etc.  It will take time to find delicious recipes for dried kidney beans - it will require experimentation, so that's why we're starting now.

In addition, we will be gardening and canning this year, and I've almost finished building the chicken coop, so we will have chickens in a few weeks, then fresh eggs.  Next year, maybe we'll start killing/cooking/canning chickens.  Dietary changes take time, so store what you eat and eat what you store.

 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: Store What You Eat --- Eat What You Store

Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I remember the problem with the MREs overseas.

I can eat almost anything except lots of sodium. I had occasion to buy a lot of genuine MRE's at a surplus store and ate them for lunch at my job daily for a month or two. Aside from sodium content, I thought they were fine and I ate them all cold. Unfortunately, even sodium aside, they are too expensive to stockpile for more than a week or two, even if you can get genuine ones.

My wife will not eat any of the "traditional"LDS type foods so I am going slowly trying to figure out how to translate what we eat daily into LT storage stuff. Oatmeal is on my list, though it isn't the highest protein grain. I'll check out waltonfeed.

I'm afraid my wife is too citified to have chickens, though she will cheerfully eat cellophane wrapped birds slaughtered by distant chicken farmers (growers? ranchers?) I grew up in the city and burbs but when I was a kid, I used to spend summers driving around southern NH with my grandfather, one of the original recyclers. Not only was he a junk man, but summers we visited farms, picked up their empty burlap chicken feed bags, stacked, counted, tied, and delivered them back to the grainery to be refilled. It was a great experience for me, though I have to say, after seeing dozens of chickens farms, zillions of (then) free range chickens, coops, and lots of egg production setups, I never had the desire to raise chickens.

 

SG

 

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments