Definitive Post-Oil Thread

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Aaron M's picture
Aaron M
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2373
RE: Rihter

As Roger said, I'm not looking at a rigid timeline, but rather the process itself.

Maybe it'd be best to think of it like this:
Let's say we're living 200 years from now - similar to how we look back on resource depletion in the Early American Colonization of the West...

What things could we do (have done, for the exercise) to make the transition from plenty of oil to oil scarcity as productive as possible without wasting resources?

So, like NOT killing off millions of bison - which we can equate to the rampant abuse of fossil fuels, we can start subbing out by getting into vehicles that do not require gasoline. We can ride bikes (which I for one think are significantly better than horses, for the most part).

My main goals are:
a. Consistency across categories - I like Biodiesel, because I can potentially use it in Trucks, Generators, tractors and make it from waste products. This gives it a tremendous advantage over things like Ethanol, which I view as a total bust.

b. Feasibility - I want to avoid the "unlimited resources" conundrum - a person on a budget should realistically be able to set these goals and achieve them incrimentally.

c. The solutions should be things that function equally well now (in contemporary western society) as they would in a "Post-Oil" society. To elaborate on "post oil", let's not assume it's all gone, just scarce and expensive, as is the most likely outcome.

d. The discussion should proceed with the understanding that we all can agree that less consumption is generally a given. 

I'm not talking about having a diesel so I can trapse all over hell and half of Texas while everyone else is bemoaning their lack of mobility. I view it as a security issue, more than anything. It can be strategically advantageous to have a vehicle that relies on energy that you can produce yourself, even if not in great quantity.

So as far as what constitutes "the interim" - we're in it. 
It may end next week, it may take 100 years - but what can we do now to benefit ourselves presently and in the future.
An analogous discussion might be like Thc0655's recent thread on identifying threats and addressing them systematically, based on your particular situation.

Cheers,

Aaron 

Dutch John's picture
Dutch John
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 50
Not biodiesel

I would not go for biodiesel, since you also need methanol. And it has a bad EROI. Better to adapt the hardware and use the crude (bio)oil. Big problem can be filtration. You need reusable filters.

Then there is the place you live. Can you grow canola? Or do you live in a forest? Then I would take wood and convert a petrol car. In a sunny desert solar power could be the best option. For all options count that you need to take a truck, car, tractor, generator that is very common.

Regards, DJ

elsinga's picture
elsinga
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 8 2008
Posts: 34
In the Netherlands in WW2,

In the Netherlands in WW2, they ran cars on gassed wood. The same process as is now considered "green" energy. This however requires cars to be around and working. ;)

I think the best way to use less oil is to use as much renewable enrgy as possible: sun, wind, water, fast growing plants/trees. And use the energy as locally as possible, to avoid losses in transport.

So: solar panels on your house to generate energy, use that energy for a pump that uses the warmth of the earth to heat your home (which ofcourse is properly insulated) and for any electric stuff you have lying around. Use the most efficient means of transport to get to where you need to be: walk, bike, car, train, whatever.

stoneman's picture
stoneman
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2010
Posts: 13
Cars running on wood gas

Cars/trucks  running on "wood gas" have been around since at least the great depression.  I personally saw them in operation in North Korea on a recent visit (they have almost no oil to speak of - what few resources there are go to the military).  It works by heating/burning wood in a furnace, in for example the flat bed of a truck, under low oxygen and the heat decomposes the wood and  drives off volatile chemicals that can burn somewhat akin to coal or natural gas. This is definitely a very do it yourself proposition. Unfortunately there is little power (although in the absence of other fuel that may be acceptable) but the main problem is the concentrated production of carbon monoxide. This is a health hazard and grave risk. Thus you really need to know what you are doing and take proper precautions to avoid getting sick, hurt or even killed.

Ready's picture
Ready
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 30 2008
Posts: 917
Why not?
Dutch John wrote:

I would not go for biodiesel, since you also need methanol. And it has a bad EROI. Better to adapt the hardware and use the crude (bio)oil. Big problem can be filtration. You need reusable filters.

Then there is the place you live. Can you grow canola? Or do you live in a forest? Then I would take wood and convert a petrol car. In a sunny desert solar power could be the best option. For all options count that you need to take a truck, car, tractor, generator that is very common.

Regards, DJ

Ready's picture
Ready
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 30 2008
Posts: 917
Well, I tried to post a

Well, I tried to post a reply to DJ, but the site zapped it when I sent it because I didn't put a title. Figures.

 

I spent a lot of time on that which I don;t have right now to replicate. Sorry.

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