The Definitive Firearms Thread

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Tycer wrote: FAlley
Tycer wrote:
FAlley wrote:

I own a Winchester 1894 in .30-30. It shoots beautifully, and I am quite comfortable in shooting it. Eventually I'd like an Springfield M1A/M14 clone, but that's far down the line when I can have something that works decently for a fourth of the price.

I'm curious what you lot would think of a single-action Ruger blackhawk for home defense. I own a beretta 92 9mm that works fine and I enjoy, it doesn't shoot on point, always a few inches below from 10'. I think the trigger is heavy, and that throws my shots off. I'm wanting something that points easily and intuitively at close range, and is reliably accurate at longe range.

Thoughts on single-action revolvers for intuitive one-handed pointability and long range accuracy?

Thoughts on the 1911 .45 for the same?

Why not get a trigger job and have the sights regulated for the ammo you use if you still shoot low with it. I would not choose a SA for HD. The 92 is a good gun, but if it does not make you happy, trade it for a different gun of similar capacity that puts 'em where you point it. That's how I chose the XDm - it was the one that shot where I pointed.

I have the Beretta 96, which is effectively the 92 in 40 cal. All in all I'd call it a "good gun" but not a great gun. 

Personally I think it's easy to field strip, but damn near impossible to disassemble for comprehensive maintenance. Also a little heavy on the trigger. It just doesn't seem to have that crisip break that I like in a good pistol. 

I am looking to trade it in and get a Springfield xDm 40 as a companion to my xDm 9 mm. 

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Pistol

FAlley,

I have both a .45 Gov't ACP and a Glock 30 (also  a .45), both excellent pointing and shooting weapons. If you are going to limit yourself to one pistol, you could either handload as Morpheus does (I haven't gotten into it) or buy a .22 conversion kit for either the Colt or the Glock, which will allow you to practice for less $$ and improve your handling skills. The old M1911 conversion unit I have was designed to INCREASE .22 recoil to try to mimic the .45. I know they make a conversion unit for the G30 but I don't think they designed it to do the same, though you can still shoot cheap (er).

JM 2 cents.

CS

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capesurvivor
capesurvivor wrote:

FAlley,

I have both a .45 Gov't ACP and a Glock 30 (also  a .45), both excellent pointing and shooting weapons. If you are going to limit yourself to one pistol, you could either handload as Morpheus does (I haven't gotten into it) or buy a .22 conversion kit for either the Colt or the Glock, which will allow you to practice for less $$ and improve your handling skills. The old M1911 conversion unit I have was designed to INCREASE .22 recoil to try to mimic the .45. I know they make a conversion unit for the G30 but I don't think they designed it to do the same, though you can still shoot cheap (er).

JM 2 cents.

CS

An additional note on handloading Cape. I can also store 10,000 rounds of ammo if I choose, and the supplies needed to do so take up the area of a medium sized box. The advantages of that are obvious in addition to 30-70% off on ammo and superior to factory ordnance performance. 

The real nice part is being able to practice with self-defense handloads (hotter hollowpoiints) for pennies on the dollar. For instance, three of my favorite factory loads are the Corbon +P 115 grain 9 mm JHP, Buffalo Bore +P+ 124 grain, 9 mm JHP, and the Federal 357B 125 grain 357 mag. These ammos are approximately $25, $30, and $22 for a box of 20. I can handroll nearly equivalent copies for about 8-10 bucks or so a box. 

Cape

I'm gonna make a bold statement here while I'm at it. I'll put those three loads up against any big bore pistol; caliber anyday of the week. Statistically, according to FBI ballistic records, the Fed 357B is considered the "gold standard" for takedowns, with Massad Ayoob claiming that FBI data supports the notion of it being the King of the Manstoppers, and also the Corbon load exceeds the energy of most 115 grain 357 mags, and comes within a hair of the 125 grain 357. The Buffalo Bores are just plain insano. Muzzle energy isn't everything though, but when you combine the brute force of these rounds with their individually notorious high expansion ratios you get some darn good manstoppers. 

Look at the reviews of the "Legendary Federal 357B"

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/125614/federal-premium-personal-defense-ammunition-357-magnum-125-grain-jacketed-hollow-point-box-of-20

584 ft-lbs of ME, Absolutely amazing. 

Look at the Corbon +P, 1350 fps. 

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/113438/cor-bon-self-defense-ammunition-9mm-luger-p-115-grain-jacketed-hollow-point-box-of-20?cm_cat=CheckoutConfirm&cm_pla=ProductDescrip

Buffalo Bores, 500 ft-lbs with flash suppressed powder

http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=118

These ammos are not cheap but can be loaded up if you know what the components are, which you can find with web searches, then you go to the manuals and load that bullet and powder to the velocities of those rounds. The savings are substantial. 

I also own 40 cal and 45 ACP, and even though the big bores are not my go to defense rounds, they are expensive at factory prices. A little smaller discount though as compared to the 357 and 9 mm. 

Don't get me wrong, I like the 40 and 45. Hell, I own them. But I'm a "placement counts first" guy, and with my xDm 9 mm I get 20 rounds in the gun, with as much smack as a 45 (using the right, albiet rather pricey factory ammo noted above), with less recoil. I figure not having to reload as much in a firefight is a extremely critical advantage. 

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 Speaking of 45's, this

 Speaking of 45's, this little xDm is a really nice gun. It's on my "list" too!

http://www.the-m-factor.com/html/specs_11.html

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Second the xDm
Morpheus wrote:

 Speaking of 45's, this little xDm is a really nice gun. It's on my "list" too!

http://www.the-m-factor.com/html/specs_11.html

Hear, hear!  In addition to my Sig P226 Navy 9mm, I have the xDm .40 and really like it. 

I am contemplating adding the CZ 75 P-01 Compact.  http://www.cz-usa.com/products/view/cz-p01/

If I could only have one firearm for carry it would be the Sig, but after a full day of shoulder holstered carry of that boat anchor, I'm glad to put it down.  I had it with me in Shenandoah National Park last fall (the mild summer and fall had pushed the black bear down frtom the higher elevations well into the populated areas) for a short two day trek up the Appalachian Trail and I had to somewhat rigorously load the right side of my pack a little heavier to compensate for balance.

Anyone out there have any experience with or thoughts on the CZ  75 P-01 Compact?  I am sold on the full size CZ 75 B, and will probably add that in the next few months...but I keep circling the bait on the compact.

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 I'm a big fan of the CZ

 I'm a big fan of the CZ family of pistols.  The CZ 75 (pre-B) is the standard in our family but I often carry a CZ 75B Compact if I'm out and about.  My primary carry around the house is a 1911, but when away from the house, it's a CZ.  My compact is very similar to the P-01 except it's not a decocker and is all steel.  If I could take only one gun with me, that would be the one I'd take.

Among the things I like about the CZ family is the ability for me to totally disassemble and reassemble the pistol without having to buy any tooling.  It's not quite as simple as taking a 1911 down completely and requires a pair of slave pins (made out of old drill bits cut to size) for reassembly.  The triggers can be tuned to be close to a 1911 in feel after swapping in a single action trigger.

One of these days, I'll probably add a 2075 Rami to the collection for deep concealment.  Right now, I don't have anything between a Compact size and a pocket pistol.  That's more of a want than a need though.  For anyone interested in a pre-B CZ 75 (no firing pin block), I found a good source of those to be Robertson's Trading Post via GunsAmerica.com.  I picked several up off of them and refurbished them into quite nice handguns.

Tim

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 Woo-hoo! Just bought this

 Woo-hoo!

Just bought this an hour ago. (like I don't already have enough shotties. LOL!)

Mossberg Cruiser 7+1 12 Ga, Buds Gun Shop special, $289 out the door. 

If interested you can find one (limited quanties at that special offer) at www.budsgunshop.com

I'm a regular here so this isn't spamming. It's related to this topic and for folks on a limited budget this might make an nicely priced home defense option for them. 

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   Never mind

 

HotspotHotspotHotspotHotspotHotspot
 
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Morpheus
Morpheus wrote:

 Woo-hoo!

Just bought this an hour ago. (like I don't already have enough shotties. LOL!)

Mossberg Cruiser 7+1 12 Ga, Buds Gun Shop special, $289 out the door. 

If interested you can find one (limited quanties at that special offer) at www.budsgunshop.com

I'm a regular here so this isn't spamming. It's related to this topic and for folks on a limited budget this might make an nicely priced home defense option for them. 

That will leave a mark!

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Low Recoil Sweet Spot?

Hi all.

I mentioned a while back that I am recovering from having injured the tendons around my elbow, which made it difficult to do a lot of things with my dominant hand. I'm getting better every day, but it got me to thinking...

While it's certainly important to train with my non-dominant hand, the thought came to mind that it would be important to think of a lighter, lower recoil gun that hits a sweet spot for weight and recoil, and still be able to mount a passable defense.

After all, we all age and some of us may become disabled or get arthritis. And you don't want to be popping Naproxen and guzzling it down with spit in the middle of a firefight.

I'm thinking maybe something like the S&W Bodyguard 380 with integrated laser sights (aim would be important if for a lower caliber round) and a couple of extra clips. (However, I understand that if you want to get one in California, you have to follow a complicated set of procedures.)

Anyways, I'd like to hear your opinion on a gun that might hit that sweet spot. Bonus for concealability, too.

Poet

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Poet, You might want to read

Poet,

You might want to read the uptdate on the review of this gun...

http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/smith-wesson-bodyguard-380-semi-auto-p...

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Poet wrote:Hi all.I
Poet wrote:

Hi all.

I mentioned a while back that I am recovering from having injured the tendons around my elbow, which made it difficult to do a lot of things with my dominant hand. I'm getting better every day, but it got me to thinking...

While it's certainly important to train with my non-dominant hand, the thought came to mind that it would be important to think of a lighter, lower recoil gun that hits a sweet spot for weight and recoil, and still be able to mount a passable defense.

After all, we all age and some of us may become disabled or get arthritis. And you don't want to be popping Naproxen and guzzling it down with spit in the middle of a firefight.

I'm thinking maybe something like the S&W Bodyguard 380 with integrated laser sights (aim would be important if for a lower caliber round) and a couple of extra clips. (However, I understand that if you want to get one in California, you have to follow a complicated set of procedures.)

Anyways, I'd like to hear your opinion on a gun that might hit that sweet spot. Bonus for concealability, too.

Poet

http://www.kimberamerica.com/1911/ultra-carry-ii

I recently acquired a Kimber ultra TLE II that pretty much fits my criteria for an easily concealable .45.  The upper part of the gun (slide, barrel, firing mechanism, etc) is about the same size as a Ruger LC9, but the handle is a little longer to accomodate larger rounds.  It fires smoothly with light recoil.  A friend had a ultra TLE II (LG) which is the same gun with laser.  He traded it for the same without laser because he found the way he handles the gun blocked the laser when his trigger finger wasn't actually inside the trigger guard.  It's a comfortable gun to handle, but with a 3" barrel, accuracy requires a little practice.

Assembling and disassembling is a bit of a trial as it requires a small wire that comes with the gun but is easy to lose.  But, by any standard breaking it down takes a while and some practice to get it right.  Another downside is price.  Also, the mag carries 7 rounds.  There may be larger mags available, but I haven't checked into that yet.  I tried a number of guns before settling on this one as the best compromise of ease of concealment, handling, quality of workmanship and firepower.  

BTW, I had a Ruger LCP, which is a small .380 comparable to the S&W TD linked.  I got rid of it because my hand is just too big to use it comfortably and I didn't like the trigger pull.  

Doug

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Recoil, Injuries and CCW

Poet,

First and foremost, best wishes on a speedy recovery.
This might sound uncharacteristic for me, but in your current state, I'd avoid doing a whole lot of live fire until you've healed successfully. 
Thoughts behind this being that you're going to have real problems if you exacerbate the injuries trying to practice, and then you run the risk of losing significantly more ground than you would if you just cut live fire out of your routine for a couple months.

Instead, you might strongly consider a dry practice regiment. I know I've posted one up before, but I do dry practice like I do exercise, and have two basic "full body" routines with some running. Dry practice is basically the same. I have rifle and pistol, and then movement drills.

For pistol work, I typically work:
10x trigger press - be as slow as you need to to make sure your front sight doesn't budge. Put as dime or a quarter on the bore to ensure you're not shaking. I do this with each hand, and sometimes increase to 15 or so.

10x reloads from concealment and retention. These are tremendously important to me, as I always carry my mags with retention.

10x drawstroke combos - during these, I draw my pistol, do a non-diagnostic stoppage drill, a reload and another trigger press.
I'll try and post a video of this later, but it's basically all the drills in the order you'd perform them.

5x support side reloads

This might take some of the strain off your tendons and give you a chance to heal, work on some of your biomechanics and even develop some skill while you're still laid up. 

As for the .380 in general, I've always found it to have recoil that is more crisp than the 9mm, and honestly, its characteristics are 'sharper' than the .45 in my way of reconing. The S&W Bodyguard is quickly earning a reputation like the Sigma did - they're NOT solid made, and after putting any significant number of rounds through them, you're going to have breakages. I'll try and find some articles to substatiate this if need be.

That said, the S&W Shield (and the M&P line in general) are top notch. In truth, if I didn't have so much time on the Glock platform (and if they offered a "mid sized", I'd probably be carrying an M&P. The shield is a touch bigger than the bodyguard, and doesn't have a laser, but it's been vetted by some folks I trust implicitly who are M&P afficianados. 

So, long story short? Dry practice, don't worry about replacing your CCW and heal fast!
Cheers,

Aaron

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 The recoil characturistics

 The recoil characturistics of a .380 can vary depending on the type of gun used.  Aaron's right about it being snappier in a light gun like a Bersa 380, but it is also quite soft when shot through a Walther PK380.  The PK380 is a pain to field strip though and if dexterity is an issue, cleaning could be a problem on that gun.

Others to check into, but that I have no personal experience with are the FN Five-Seven.  It's supposed to have almost no recoil yet still have useful ballistics.  A PMR 30 fires the .22WM round and would be pretty light in recoil, but you give up a lot of power in that round.  On the plus side, you have 30 of them to work with.

Tim

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regarding dry fire

In my experience dry fire, as Aaron said, is a recoiless exercise. But at the gun shop, and also by the instructor for my carry permit,  I was told that some guns can be harmed by dry firing. I was warned that 9mm pistols should not be dry-fired.  It can harm the gun due to the difference in how the hammer hits the ammunition, because of how the ammo is made. 9mm has the powder on the outside rim of the part of your ammo the hammer hits; other calibers have their gunpowder in the center.

So I have a .32 revolver that I was told by my gunsmith is not harmed at all if I aim it--carefully and completely checked as unloaded--at a target and practice aiming and firing dry. As I can only get to the range on the family farm every few months, it not only saves me on ammo costs but it keeps me in practice. It's no where near as strenuous either.

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dry fire

 I have a S&W 22A target pistol that the owner's manual warns against dry firing.  The same may be true of all rim fire 22s, but I'm not sure.

Doug

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safewrite wrote: In my

In my experience dry fire, as Aaron said, is a recoiless exercise. But at the gun shop, and also by the instructor for my carry permit,  I was told that some guns can be harmed by dry firing. I was warned that 9mm pistols should not be dry-fired.  It can harm the gun due to the difference in how the hammer hits the ammunition, because of how the ammo is made. 9mm has the powder on the outside rim of the part of your ammo the hammer hits; other calibers have their gunpowder in the center.

So I have a .32 revolver that I was told by my gunsmith is not harmed at all if I aim it--carefully and completely checked as unloaded--at a target and practice aiming and firing dry. As I can only get to the range on the family farm every few months, it not only saves me on ammo costs but it keeps me in practice. It's no where near as strenuous either.

[/quote

 

I don't mean to nit pick, but I think you are mistaken regarding your comments on 9mm ammo.

9mm has a primer in the center the same as other calibers.  It sounds like you are describing rimfire ammunition like .22.

As far as dry firing, I mainly know about Glock and I assume that other striker fired pistols are similar.

The Glock is dry fired as part of the field strip process.  I once asked Glock technical support if it was ok to dry fire a 9mm Glock and was told that it is fine to dry fire, but if you were going to practice heavily it would be good to use Snap Caps.

My understanding is that there is a chance that the firing pin can drive too far in the firing pin channel when there is not a round or something like a snap cap to stop the forward motion.  I think that the firing pin might in some cases be damaged if it hits the breech face from the inside.

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Close but not a bulls eye
safewrite wrote:

9mm has the powder on the outside rim of the part of your ammo the hammer hits; other calibers have their gunpowder in the center.

Safewrite

You are right in principle, but a bit off in application.

You should never dry fire a gun that uses a “rim fire” cartridge, which contains the priming compound inside the rim at the base of the cartridge. Without the soft brass cartridge in place the firing pin will strike the hard steel of the breech, and over time it will be mashed down our break. All .22 caliber ammo is rim fire and noted for duds that do not fire because the priming compound is not always evenly distributed around the rim.

“Center fire” cartridges have a small capsule in the center of the base with the priming compound. This is a later and more reliable technology. In addition, the brass case can be reloaded (reused) to save money, and have more consistent or custom ballistics. Most popular ammo is center fire, including 9mm. 

In both cases a small amount of priming compound is used to set off the much larger amount of gunpowder in the interior of the cartridge case.

It seems like it should be okay to dry fire a center fire gun since the firing pin would not hit anything. However, that depends on the mechanical design of the firing mechanism, and in some cases damage could result. The owner’s manual should answer this question, and most are available on line. They might warn against dry firing just because of liability fears, even if it won’t hurt the gun. Be sure you still follow all the gun safety rules when dry firing.

To the best of my knowledge, you can dry fire any gun if you use a “snap cap”. These are same size as a cartridge with a base designed to absorb the strike of the firing pen. You can buy them online for almost any caliber. People who reload sometimes make their own. If you have a semi automatic pistol you can have someone mix some in your magazine with live rounds. If your barrel moves down when you try to fire the “dud” you need to work to remove your anticipation of recoil.

 http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=5176/Product/AMMO-SNAP-CAPS

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=247/Product/DELUXE-SNAP-CAP

 Thanks for all your posts in the forums. You’ve shared a lot of good info.

 Travlin

PS  Joe was quicker to the draw. 

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safewrite wrote:  I was
safewrite wrote:

 I was warned that 9mm pistols should not be dry-fired.  It can harm the gun due to the difference in how the hammer hits the ammunition, because of how the ammo is made. 9mm has the powder on the outside rim of the part of your ammo the hammer hits; other calibers have their gunpowder in the center.

BS.

It's rimfires that have the powder in the rim. 9mm is exactly like every other centerfire.

I've heard not to dry fire .22s, but I've never broken a firing pin. I do keep an extra Smith & Wesson revolver firing pin and I have an extra for my Marlin 39A.

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This is why..

 I love this forum. 
Since Joe, Travlin and Tycer already knocked this one out of the park, I'll just throw out there that dry firing- and maintenance - are largely misunderstood because of how firearms were made pre-1950 or so.

I'm working on another contribution that will talk more about some of the myths we hear often, but in general, the above advice is spot on.
I've heard that dry firing is like slamming a car door, that it will wear your weapon out and all sorts of stuff, but the bottom line is that your weapon is literally made to perform this operation with ~25,000-75,000 PSI of pressure at the same time. 

You will not hurt your firearm. =)

Cheers,

Aaron

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 I don't dry fire my .22s

 I don't dry fire my .22s without a snapcap in there, but do wonder if this only applies to certain weapons.  My old Glenfield/Marlin 25 has been dry fired thousands of times over the years back before any of us knew any better, and still works fine with no deformation.  Still, I only dry fire 22s with snapcaps now days just in case.  Snapcaps are handy to keep around in any case though as they are good practice for reload and malfunction drills.  Also, I don't allow the slides in my 1911s to forceably close without a round or a snapcap in place.

Tim

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Tim - good point

Good to mention not letting your slide forcefully snap closed.  They need to have the friction of stripping a round from the magazine to reduce the force or else it might hurt something.

They mentioned this at the Glock Armorer Class that I attended.

On the other hand, with live rounds you need to make sure to not hold the slide back and let it slam with full force.

I was showing my uncle how to rack the slide on his G19 (using inert training rounds) and he created a type-3 malfunction (one round in chamber, new round with nose jammed against the first round) by babying his slide and not letting it snap forward properly.

It could not have worked out better if I had planned it.  A perfect "teaching moment".

Joe

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Aaron Moyer wrote:  I love
Aaron Moyer wrote:

 I love this forum. 
Since Joe, Travlin and Tycer already knocked this one out of the park, I'll just throw out there that dry firing- and maintenance - are largely misunderstood because of how firearms were made pre-1950 or so.

I'm working on another contribution that will talk more about some of the myths we hear often, but in general, the above advice is spot on.
I've heard that dry firing is like slamming a car door, that it will wear your weapon out and all sorts of stuff, but the bottom line is that your weapon is literally made to perform this operation with ~25,000-75,000 PSI of pressure at the same time. 

You will not hurt your firearm. =)

Cheers,

Aaron

Agreed Aaron. The "dry fire" concern came about a long time ago, before advances in metallurgy reduced the brittleness of modern firing pins. I have a S&W 19-4 357, circa 1970's that I would not dare dry fire for fear of shattering the firing pin. 

In the same token, I don't hesitate to dry fire my Sig, my xDm, Berretta, or Glocks, but I use a rule of thumb that I can safely dry fire if they were manufactured post 1990. 

I don't know the exact era when the metallurgy improved on firing mechanism, but I use that as a rule of thumb for me. 

It will not hurt your (newer) firearms. 

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cc permits

I'll throw this out fwiw.  About two years ago I applied for my CC permit.  The woman who runs the program for our county told me it would take about two months to get it.  It took a little less than that.  My wife just applied for her permit.  The same woman told her it would take about six months.

That's anecdotal, but it is consistent with what I hear from local gun shops.  Business is way up, particularly in assault type weapons.

Doug

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...

Greaaaaaat.
Not that I'm anti-gun, and it may be surprising, but I really hate the idea that sales of fighting rifles are up while training is at a standstill.
Training in and of itself isn't even my main concern. The margins for error are just getting wildly out of control. Between face-eating psychopaths, desperate social outcasts and drug-running criminals, it's just a matter of course that these things are falling into some pretty irresponsible hands.

I used to support the 2nd Amendment more strongly than I do now... because I used to believe in America, and American's ability to handle responsibility. Now, all I see are angry, spoiled children who're losing their trust fund. *shudder*

Community and community defense is all I can say on this. 
Cheers,

Aaron 

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Aaron Moyer
Aaron Moyer wrote:

Greaaaaaat.
Not that I'm anti-gun, and it may be surprising, but I really hate the idea that sales of fighting rifles are up while training is at a standstill.
Training in and of itself isn't even my main concern. The margins for error are just getting wildly out of control. Between face-eating psychopaths, desperate social outcasts and drug-running criminals, it's just a matter of course that these things are falling into some pretty irresponsible hands.

I used to support the 2nd Amendment more strongly than I do now... because I used to believe in America, and American's ability to handle responsibility. Now, all I see are angry, spoiled children who're losing their trust fund. *shudder*

Community and community defense is all I can say on this. 
Cheers,

Aaron 

+308. 

Interesting that you said this. Just yesterday I was talking with one of my shooting buddies, yapping about the new shotty that I built, and he looked at me and said "you gettin' training for that?", to wit I replied, "nah, I've gotten plenty of training with the AK, and plan on some more, so that'll keep my time (and money) tied up for a while. I'm sure some of that's gonna transfer". 

He chuckled. 

He then replied, "then why'd you get it?". Why not get a hunting shotty instead?

To make a long point short, we talked for a bit, and he (a former Marine Recon guy) shot my argument to pieces, and today I'm calling my instructor and inquiring about defensive shotgun training. 

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3243
Training

 I just discovered a training/competition group in my area that is associated with the International Defensive Pistol Association (IDPA).  I had a good conversation with the owner and am looking forward to beginning training the end of the month.  Does anyone have experience with IDPA?

Doug

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Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
regarding dry fire - thanks

Hey thanks for all the (correct) info on dry-firing. You will note, in my original post. I was VERY CAREFUL to state where i got this information, and not state is as "gospel" fact past what I had been told.

You guys rock. I knew if my informants were wrong you'd correct me and you all did not dissapoint.

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joesxm2011
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 16 2011
Posts: 259
IDPA
Doug wrote:

 I just discovered a training/competition group in my area that is associated with the International Defensive Pistol Association (IDPA).  I had a good conversation with the owner and am looking forward to beginning training the end of the month.  Does anyone have experience with IDPA?

Doug

I have been a member of IDPA and participated in several of the club-level matches.  IDPA is a good way to get some pistol experience in a more fluid format than the normal square range.

The club that I attended would set up three separate ranges each with a scenario that you would have to shoot.  One person goes at a time and they time you and also add seconds if you fail to hit the target well enough.  Each person gets one trip through each scenario, so I would get to shoot three times per night.

The people that ran it were very friendly and made sure that I was taken care of when I first showed up.  They assigned an experienced member to show me the ropes on my first night.

The scenarios involve moving and shooting and shooting from behind cover.

Once a year they require you to complete a "classifier" test that puts you into a category so you you can compete with people at the same level.  Everyone shoots with each other but you compare your score to others in your category.

There were some very good shooters at the events I attended.  If you get better you can attend state and national events, although they have some entry restrictions for the more prestigous events.  One guy at my club won the National in the Revolver category.

One thing to keep in mind is that IDPA is considered a "game" by most of the participants.  Because of that they do some things that go faster but are not really tactically correct.  You can probably Google some gun forums that discuss this aspect of IDPA.

One example is that when shooting from behind cover you should be standing four to six feet back and working the angle ot keep the cover between you and the enemy.  At IDPA people stand right up at the barrier and due to safety and space limitations it may even be frowned upon to do it in a tactically correct manner.

They also have a rule that when shooting from behind cover at least 50% of you must be covered.  In real life this would be far to much exposed.

All said, IDPA is a great deal of fun and will inject some stress into your shooting run.  I highly recommend you give it a try.

Joe

 

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3243
joesxm2011

 Thanks, I was wondering if the game aspect might crowd out correct tactics.  The guy I talked to pretty much agreed with your observations, but said he preferred to not worry about time and just work on accuracy.  At least in the beginning, that's how I'll take it.

Doug

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