The Definitive Firearms Thread

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kaman's picture
kaman
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phecksel wrote: Funny story,
phecksel wrote:

Funny story, firearms are absolutely forbidden at my employer, including in my personal car.  I had to drive from one side of Detroit to the other side.  Normally, freeways would have been taken, but I left later than I desired and made the bad decision to stay on surface streets.  Not an environment I wanted to be in without my carry :(

 

Decision made - your job is worth more than your life.

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gun purse update

I'm in the Deep South, and it gets really hot here most of the year: not an environment I'd want an on-body carrry in and I wanted a year-round method of concealed carry. I always have my purse with me when I am not home. I therefore chose a gun purse as my means of carry, and y'all sent me to The Cornered Cat's website since Cornered Cat reviews them. Others of you sent me links to various gun purse manufacturers. I looked at all the choices and in general I was not real happy with the selection of gun purses online. They were mostly not the style I carry--shoulder bags--and since I have carried a shoulder bag for over 40 years that would be a hard habbit to break. Plus the online gun purses were incredibly expensive, and we are prepping on a budget (who isn't?)

On the practical side I was not pleased with where the desgins put the the openings for the guns on the purses. I will not have TIME to unzip an outside gun pouch if I need it, and I did not want the noise of either a zipper or velcro if I need to get my revolver out quietly.

My step-daughter is a professional costumer. I showed her what I wanted. "Oh," she grinned, "that's easy!" She made me a custom gun sleeve for inside my existing purse, which she then attached with extra-heavy button thread (one could use either rivets or snaps that are fused into rivets to attach something like it). A simple elastic band holds it in the sleeve and the purse closes with a quiet magnet. It's comfortable to carry now, very easy to reach, and hidden. I think it is very natural-looking to reach into my nomal cross-carry shoulderbag for my piece with this arrangement. It might not be for everyone, since my revolver has a two-step trigger, but it really works for me.

I really I like the potential for quietly reaching into my purse to hand a would-be robber what he extects to be my "wallet."  Should that happen, won't he be surprised!

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Handgun retention (in a purse)

 Safewrite:

Sounds like you've come up with a workable solution. You may also have come up with a marketable product!  I too have noticed the not-so-great choices in "gun purses" and in some of the breathtaking prices. As you probably already know, one of the most important issues with "off-body carry" (such as in a purse, brief case, etc.) is handgun retention.  One of the oldest crimes in the book is for a thug to rip your purse off your shoulder or out of your hands while running past you. Anyone who's going to carry in a purse HAS to have a workable plan for that eventuality. Cross-carry (as you mentioned you do) seems to me to be the beginning of any such plan. This means the strap over your dominant side shoulder (right shoulder if you're right-handed) and purse on non-dominant hip (left hip for right handers). Most thugs will not bother to try to snatch a purse carried this way because it will guarantee a bit of a struggle AND the use of enough force to upgrade the crime from misdemeanor theft to felony robbery. However, some thugs are inexperienced or intoxicated enough to try it.  Also, if a thug nearby sees you put a wad of cash or a new diamond ring still in the box inside the purse he may take the chance in spite of your cross carry. That means you need to have a plan for such an attempt. I don't remember ever reading or seeing a handgun retention expert  give training on this particular subject, except for those who say never to carry a handgun in a purse.  Just off the top of my head here's what I would say:

1. Your non-dominant hand/arm must always be kept draped over the purse so that if you are surprised by a take-away attempt the hand and arm can clamp down on the purse instantly keeping it pinned to your hip and closed. Your first line of defense is keeping the purse pinned to your hip. I say "instantly" but the fastest anyone can react is about 1/4 second.  You should have a training partner stand behind you while you are blindfolded and try to snatch the purse away so it isn't pinned to your hip anymore.  I think you'll see the immense value of seeing the attempt coming even if you have only 1/2 second to react, and that keeping it pinned there is a lot harder than it might seem before you try doing it.

2. The strap on the purse has to be very robust so that it WILL NOT break in a real life struggle with a determined thief.  If the strap breaks he will probably have the leverage to get it away from you.

3. Some percentage of thieves will give up if you successfully pin the purse to your hip in the initial take away attempt. You have to prepare for those who will continue and ESCALATE the violence.  Your next step, while keeping your purse pinned, is to use your dominant hand to reach across for your gun. It may be possible to remove the gun during a struggle.  If so, let go of the purse and prepare to fire. (Letting the purse slip off your shoulder on purpose without getting dragged down the street is another skill worth developing in training.)

4. Your next objective (which can be started while reaching for your gun) will be to go to the ground, on your back, with your feet up and pointing toward your assailant (while keeping your purse pinned and your gun in your dominant hand, if possible). Being on your back with your feet facing your assailant is a pretty good defensive position.  Just keep kicking him away while trying to get your gun out.  This, of course, should also be practiced in the gym on a padded mat.

Remember, your first objective is to retain possession of your gun.  This is so you can defend yourself if the attack continues, and so you can deny a low level criminal possession of a handgun which will almost always graduate him into an armed robber, and possibly a murderer. Gun first, purse second.

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Firearms Finish

I'm wanting to cheaply (and effectively) color a few parts of one of my handguns (Taurus 92) to stainless steel. I've never messed with firearms finishes before. I'm aware of finishes such as GunKote, Cerakote and Duracoat. Would I be able to simply spray on some engine paint (available at any automotive store) and have something that works? Will I need to sand off the existing blued finish in order to make any new finish stick?

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firearms finish reply

 you can get a Duracoat kit so affordably from Midway USA or other that I'd opt that way vs high temp engine paint ... you might save $15 with engine paint BUT I'd be suspect of its ability to last

we live in, essentially, a Pacific N'West Rain Forest and have used Duracoat and love it in these harsh conditions

so, in my opinion, for something as essential as defensive firearm I'd eliminate doubt and spend the extra $15

http://www.lauerweaponry.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&categ...

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/522878/lauer-duracoat-firearm-finish-se...

I hope this is of service

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have you considered

 Safewrite

have you considered something like these?  (women's cut coming soon)

http://ccwbreakaways.com/index.html

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kaman wrote: Decision made
kaman wrote:

Decision made - your job is worth more than your life.

Well,when you put it that way :)

Jobs in Detroit area are difficult to come by.  I pull out of my attached garage, park fairly close to a somewhat secure door, work in an obscure office (think broom closet between restrooms, LOL).  I normally don't worry too much about my travels to and from work, there are a lot of higher value targets.  So yea, my job is pretty important to me... besides that, I really enjoy it.  Outside of my work hours, I'm seldom without a firearm either on me or within reach.

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Pistol packin' granny

 

Maybe this shoulda been on the HUMOR thread, but it fits here too! 

http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/lewrw/archives/104666.html

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Food for thought
thc0655 wrote:

2. The strap on the purse has to be very robust so that it WILL NOT break in a real life struggle with a determined thief.  If the strap breaks he will probably have the leverage to get it away from you.

And if he is prepared with a sharp knife he just cuts it before you know you have a problem.

If the purse is not on your body at all times  when away from home you also have the safety issue of someone getting into it and handling a loaded gun, particularly children.  Women leave their purses sitting on the floor in all kinds of places.  I'm just saying ...

Travlin 

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Yeah, and if you manage to

Yeah, and if you manage to retain your weapon, don't forget NOT to shoot, in the back, that scumbag running away with your custom-gifted purse.  We've all read- or re-read- Massad Ayoob's "In the Gravest Extreme", right?  Don't want someone of your "caliber" behind bars for such an event, Safewrite.  Aloha, Steve.

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Travlin wrote: thc0655
Travlin wrote:
thc0655 wrote:

2. The strap on the purse has to be very robust so that it WILL NOT break in a real life struggle with a determined thief.  If the strap breaks he will probably have the leverage to get it away from you.

And if he is prepared with a sharp knife he just cuts it before you know you have a problem.

If the purse is not on your body at all times  when away from home you also have the safety issue of someone getting into it and handling a loaded gun, particularly children.  Women leave their purses sitting on the floor in all kinds of places.  I'm just saying ...

Travlin 

Both good points, Travlin. There are a lot of disadvantages to off-body carry, and these are two more. I guess that's why many (male!) retention experts just say, "Don't do it!"  Of course, there are IMO even more disadvantages to NOT carrying concealed in most cases. On the other hand....

In my law enforcement career I've never heard of or been involved in a case where a thief used a knife to cut a purse strap (I know it does rarely happen).  I am however familiar with uncounted instances of a robber brandishing a knife and demanding a purse, money, etc. If he has a knife he'll probably skip the snatch-and-run, and just demand what you've got.

If a woman is going to carry in her purse, you're right, SHE CAN NEVER EVER LET THE PURSE LEAVE CONTACT WITH HER BODY (keep the strap over her shoulder, sit with it on her lap, wedge it between her feet while sitting on a toilet, etc.). Even setting it on a counter to retrieve a wallet or something else makes it more vulnerable to a quick grab (learn to pull the purse around to your front and fish through it while the strap is still on your shoulder). That takes a lot of new mental discipline, but it can be done by any determined adult. My wife carries in a purse a few times/week and follows these precautions. If she thinks these precautions will be impossible or draw attention where she's going, she either carries a different way or not at all.

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cut straps and prototypes

Oh, I've had my purse strap cut so I know about that one. It really helps to have a piece of wire rope inside the strap (that foiled my would-be robber, who fled) or a not-only-decorative chain on the strap leather. FYI the chain sort of warns them off, being visible.

Keep it on me at all times? Easy, even when I drive. It fits on my lap: it's not piece of huge pseudo luggage like some ladies carry.  I have a revolver child-safe lock that fits through an open chamber for when I see my grandson, the only child I normally am around. Plus after working/rail commuting in NYC I don't put my bag down anywhere short of a safe or my bedside.( Side note:  I reallly am uncomfortable with air travel since I started carrying, and tend to use my car for longer trips now - with all due consideration for various state laws and agreements.)

I know our gun purse sleeve might be a marketable product but I want to do some more field testing of the prototype before I send one off to The Cornered Cat for a review.

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pacsafe

If these folks were smart, they'd make CCW bags for women and men but they haven't yet. I own one of their male laptop-type bags that I carry in cities or overseas because the bag is lined with stainless steel mesh and the strap has invisible wire cable in it. The tops also lock so the zipper can't be unfastened and picked, not helpful for CCW but good for wallets, passports, etc.  

You could order  a bag from zappos.com, free postage to buy and return, and  see if you think one is modifiable by for CCW. I've carried a G30 in mine just inside when even an IWB holster was not possible. Not fast or ideal but better than being unarmed. I've considered sewing a holster in there but haven't tried it yet.

http://www.pacsafe.com/www/index.php?_room=3&product_status=New

SG

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FAlley wrote: I'm wanting to
FAlley wrote:

I'm wanting to cheaply (and effectively) color a few parts of one of my handguns (Taurus 92) to stainless steel. I've never messed with firearms finishes before. I'm aware of finishes such as GunKote, Cerakote and Duracoat. Would I be able to simply spray on some engine paint (available at any automotive store) and have something that works? Will I need to sand off the existing blued finish in order to make any new finish stick?

I'll second Aaron's recommendation of Duracoat.  I've done 5 pistols in varying colors over the last 4 months and am very happy with the results.  It's not only easy to do, but very durable.  One of the guns I've done got a complete coat of Coyote Tan including the barrels, lugs and all.  After around 300 rounds, the finish is only worn on the extreme surfaces and has held up at least as good as the factory coatings on several other guns I've had.  The best thing to do if you opt for Duracoat is buy the reducer at the same time, to make airbrushing a bit easier.  Then, buy a cheap toaster oven.  You can probably find one second hand for around $5 or $10.  Mine was free, but works well enough for what I wanted it to do.  Then, after you spray the firearm, let it airdry for about an hour while you clean the airbrush.  Then pop it in the toaster oven set on the lowest setting which should be between 110 and 150 degrees.  After an hour, pop it out and reassemble the gun.  No need to wait after that point, as it's ready to shoot.

If you do Duracoat, you don't need to remove the bluing.  In fact, the bluing will help with adhesion as long as it's been thoroughly degreesed.  One gun I've done is a TZ 75 that was in a matte blue.  I scrubbed the frame using Simple Green, then hosed it off with a non-chlorinated brake cleaner.  The toaster oven comes in handy to warm the parts before painting as the brake cleaner left the parts ice cold.  The ice cold parts started to condense moisture when I brought them into the house, but a couple of minutes in the toaster oven while mixing the paint had them at the perfect temp to be sprayed.

Tim

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(No subject)

1984

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Never, Always

Aaron,

I did not read every post, so I don't know if this was addressed or not, but I use never and always in this context: Never point a gun at anything or anyone you do not intend to shoot. Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. I believe you would agree with this use of these words. I don't mean to be confrontational, it probably just got missed.

I was shot through the midsection when I was 13 by a friend who violated both these rules. It was not fun.

I would encourage first time shooters to start with a 22 caliber gun to learn the fundamentals. It is very easy to develop bad habits with for example a 9mm pistol, and very hard to unlearn. I know this is not possible for everyone,and not absolutely necessary for everyone, just a suggestion.

I have taught several people, men and women to shoot and safety is the first thing I teach. Another rule I have is, there are no surprises. I shoot the gun before they do in their presence so they know what to expect. I would never hand a beginner a 357 to see them shocked by the noise and recoil. That is not funny, it is childish. I want people of all ages to want to shoot and enjoy it. I once had about seven young people from my church come to my home to learn how to shoot. As far as I know, everyone had a good time and learned some fundamentals. I live in Eastern Washington with my wife on 20 acres and shoot in my backyard. Very convenient, and I am always open to teaching folks how to shoot. Thanks for starting this thread and the good advice you have given, and thanks for opening it up for general comment.

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redfir223 wrote: Aaron, I
redfir223 wrote:

Aaron,

I did not read every post, so I don't know if this was addressed or not, but I use never and always in this context: Never point a gun at anything or anyone you do not intend to shoot. Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. I believe you would agree with this use of these words. I don't mean to be confrontational, it probably just got missed.

I was shot through the midsection when I was 13 by a friend who violated both these rules. It was not fun.

I would encourage first time shooters to start with a 22 caliber gun to learn the fundamentals. It is very easy to develop bad habits with for example a 9mm pistol, and very hard to unlearn. I know this is not possible for everyone,and not absolutely necessary for everyone, just a suggestion.

I have taught several people, men and women to shoot and safety is the first thing I teach. Another rule I have is, there are no surprises. I shoot the gun before they do in their presence so they know what to expect. I would never hand a beginner a 357 to see them shocked by the noise and recoil. That is not funny, it is childish. I want people of all ages to want to shoot and enjoy it. I once had about seven young people from my church come to my home to learn how to shoot. As far as I know, everyone had a good time and learned some fundamentals. I live in Eastern Washington with my wife on 20 acres and shoot in my backyard. Very convenient, and I am always open to teaching folks how to shoot. Thanks for starting this thread and the good advice you have given, and thanks for opening it up for general comment.

Welcome! You'll find that the four rules are stressed here time and again when talking with new shooters. The 22 is definitely my go to for new shooters.

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rules violation

 Never point a gun at anything or anyone you do not intend to shoot. Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

 

....who violated both these rules.

 I'm thinking this is the same safety rule.  I'm bettin' your friend also violated several others including don't load the gun until you want to use it, and don't put your finger on the trigger unless you intend to fire the gun.  'Course, being 13 years old, I hope it wasn't "don't play with guns".  Aloha, Steve.

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Kimber

 What do you folks know about the Kimber ultra carry II?  Also, have any of you bought from Proguns?  They have good prices but I have never bought a gun online and don't know all the problems that could occur.

Thanx

Doug

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online firearm purchase
Doug wrote:

 What do you folks know about the Kimber ultra carry II?  Also, have any of you bought from Proguns?  They have good prices but I have never bought a gun online and don't know all the problems that could occur.

Thanx

Doug

Doug,

I don't know anything about the Kimber or Proguns.  The Proguns site makes me a bit uneasy though by overtly calling the AK-47s and AR-15s "assault rifles".  Also, they seem to have nothing in stock (that I checked) or available for sale (including the Kimber you mentioned).  It may be nothing but something just seems "off".

FWIW, I've bought numerous guns online and never had a single problem of any type with the dealer on either end, the shipping, or the merchandise.  However, from a legal and regulatory point of view, I don't know how things are in the state you live in.  I've used gundealeronline.com and tannersportcenter.com.  They'll talk you through the process.   

 

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Doug wrote:  What do you
Doug wrote:

 What do you folks know about the Kimber ultra carry II?  Also, have any of you bought from Proguns?  They have good prices but I have never bought a gun online and don't know all the problems that could occur.

Thanx

Doug

I currently own and often carry a Kimber Ultra II.  It has been a very good gun in the two years I've owned it.  My round count is around 600 right now and the gun has been very reliable once I replaced the factory magazine with a pair of Wilson Combat mags.  The only other thing I've done on mine is to add night sights and very thin grips.  My gun came with a good set of rubber grips, but I replaced them to make the pistol as thin as possible for IWB CC.

The gun carries well, has been reliable and is accurate.  There is not much more I can ask for in a gun.

Tim

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Anybody with Kriss Vector experience?

I had the opportunity to shoot the Kriss SBO/SO .45 ACP a few weekends ago and I was very impressed.  It took some time to get used to the recoil management and fact that 60% of the felt recoil energy was gone.  Muzzle climb was essentially non-existent.  Once I got used to it, reacquisition was darn near immediate and I managed more than a few double taps in the same freakin' hole!! 

Standard Glock 21 .45 mag - cross compatability strikes me as a plus if you also carried a Glock sidearm?  Nothing like a force multiplier to make things more attractive.

My exposure was very limited, but I'm more than a little curious and wondering if anyone out there has more experience or thoughts?

Thanks in advance.....

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controlled bump fire

I seen this demonstrated online but a friend told me he had a chance to try one out and was very impressed.

http://militarygunsupply.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=57&products_id=1082

www.slidefire.com

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Necessity

ao,

Just offering up an opinion here, but unless you have a  dedicated suppressive fire rifle, that $350 would be better spent on mags and ammunition. As to automatic fire... Im of the opinion that there is nearly no situation we may face that'd require it, or couldn't be solved with semi automatic fire.

proper automatic fire requires a good deal of discipline and control... The devices that simulate it require you split your attentions even further leading to further degradation in accuracy and effectiveness.

Hate to say it, but if you want automatic rifle capability, save get an NFA rifle. There's really no substitute.

Cheers,

Aaron 

I'd steer clear and put that money into something you can't overcome with more training and practice.

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Aaron Moyer wrote: ao, Just
Aaron Moyer wrote:

ao,

Just offering up an opinion here, but unless you have a  dedicated suppressive fire rifle, that $350 would be better spent on mags and ammunition. As to automatic fire... Im of the opinion that there is nearly no situation we may face that'd require it, or couldn't be solved with semi automatic fire.

proper automatic fire requires a good deal of discipline and control... The devices that simulate it require you split your attentions even further leading to further degradation in accuracy and effectiveness.

Hate to say it, but if you want automatic rifle capability, save get an NFA rifle. There's really no substitute.

Cheers,

Aaron 

I'd steer clear and put that money into something you can't overcome with more training and practice.

Thanks for your thoughts Aaron.  I think if I obtained any more ammo now, I'd probably be in violation of some BATF, fire, or insurance law and if I got any more mags, I probably should be getting belts instead.;-)  Right now, disposable income is going into other areas but if I were to channel it back into the firearms category, it would go into developing additional night vision capability.  Equipment wise, I think that is the area that most people I talk to are lacking.

With regards to automatic fire, I've always been an advocate of a well placed shot as opposed to "spray and pray".  On the other hand, depending upon how much TSHTF, there may come a time and a situation when it might be advantageous.  I think the fact that militaries of the world have been reliant upon automatic weapons fire for a hundred years attests somewhat to its efficacy.

With regards to an NFA rifle, the real deal is indeed better than a somewhat gimmicky device but (1) I wouldn't want to put the governmental bullseye on my back by getting one (which is also part of my reluctance to obtain a CCW), (2) I don't want to pay the premium for one, (3) I don't want to pay the taxes for one, and (4) I don't want to get involved in the legal responsibility of owning one. 

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Semi auto shotgun for home defense?

I don't recall seeing much of a discussion on the use of a semi-auto shotgun for home defense, but have to admit to being too lazy to search the 280 pages in this thread to verify that.  I recently picked up a Mossberg 930 SPX 12g semi-auto shotgun to compliment a Mossberg 500 that has lived under the bed for years.  Last weekend, I ran 100 rounds of 12g through the thing without a single problem.  I am truely amazed at how quickly this thing will tear up whatever is in front of it.  How many others have opted for a semi-auto shotgun for the home defense role?

The benefits are that it can put out a truely huge amount of lead pretty quickly, does not depend on the users familiarity with it for follow up shots, has a softer recoil than a standard 12g and it's cheaper to practice with than an AR or AK.  The downside is fewer rounds on board and the need to practice reload drills to keep it running beyond the first 9 rounds.

In about the same amount of time it takes to fire 3 or 4 rounds of 9mm, you can deliver 27 pellets of about 32 caliber.  The thing is truely impressive in it's ability to throw lead.

Tim

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semi-auto shotgun
Tim_P wrote:

I don't recall seeing much of a discussion on the use of a semi-auto shotgun for home defense, but have to admit to being too lazy to search the 280 pages in this thread to verify that.  I recently picked up a Mossberg 930 SPX 12g semi-auto shotgun to compliment a Mossberg 500 that has lived under the bed for years.  Last weekend, I ran 100 rounds of 12g through the thing without a single problem.  I am truely amazed at how quickly this thing will tear up whatever is in front of it.  How many others have opted for a semi-auto shotgun for the home defense role?

The benefits are that it can put out a truely huge amount of lead pretty quickly, does not depend on the users familiarity with it for follow up shots, has a softer recoil than a standard 12g and it's cheaper to practice with than an AR or AK.  The downside is fewer rounds on board and the need to practice reload drills to keep it running beyond the first 9 rounds.

In about the same amount of time it takes to fire 3 or 4 rounds of 9mm, you can deliver 27 pellets of about 32 caliber.  The thing is truely impressive in it's ability to throw lead.

Tim

Tim,

Check the archives.  I had a discussion with Aaron related to the subject some time back.  Here's one quote:

"In terms of firepower, a semi-auto shotgun with a 9 round capacity like a Mossberg 930 SPX or FN SLP loaded with 2 3/4" #4 buckshot, can put 189 projectiles down range in less than 2 seconds.  That's not only kinetic energy, that's firepower."

The Mossberg is a lot cheaper than the FN SLP, especially now, but I liked the quality of the FN SLP better.

   

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Tim_P wrote: I don't recall
Tim_P wrote:

I don't recall seeing much of a discussion on the use of a semi-auto shotgun for home defense, but have to admit to being too lazy to search the 280 pages in this thread to verify that.  I recently picked up a Mossberg 930 SPX 12g semi-auto shotgun to compliment a Mossberg 500 that has lived under the bed for years.  Last weekend, I ran 100 rounds of 12g through the thing without a single problem.  I am truely amazed at how quickly this thing will tear up whatever is in front of it.  How many others have opted for a semi-auto shotgun for the home defense role?

The benefits are that it can put out a truely huge amount of lead pretty quickly, does not depend on the users familiarity with it for follow up shots, has a softer recoil than a standard 12g and it's cheaper to practice with than an AR or AK.  The downside is fewer rounds on board and the need to practice reload drills to keep it running beyond the first 9 rounds.

In about the same amount of time it takes to fire 3 or 4 rounds of 9mm, you can deliver 27 pellets of about 32 caliber.  The thing is truely impressive in it's ability to throw lead.

Tim

What a person needs to do is train with their weapon. This is more important with a shotty. The lack of sights, length, weight and low magazine capacity make it more challenging to move through a home. In addition, shooting and reloading one handed should you be injured or have a phone or flashlight in one hand takes even more training. The pattern of 12ga shot is fist sized at home distances, they are more like a horizontal string of pellets than a flat round platter.

That looks like an excellent gun BTW

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Jim H
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 8 2009
Posts: 2391
opinions.....?

I am considering purchasing a semi-auto 12G....   have a Mossy 20G pump now.   I am attracted to the Beretta TX-4 storm... and the Benelli's as well.  Not sure if they are worth the extra bucks vs. the Mossberg.  One of the issues as I see it is shell capacity... most of these in a home defense barrel length end up being 5 + 1 or even 4 + 1 designs...  I think at least the Benelli has some aftermarket longer tube options.. but then you get into the laws (922r) regarding modifying non-US made long guns, whereby you have to make a whole bunch of (US-made) mod's... right?  Nothing is ever simple in gun land..., especially when you live in NY or CA. 

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Tim_P
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 23 2009
Posts: 298
 The Mossberg 930 SPX has a

 The Mossberg 930 SPX has a 7 round mag tube and with ghost loading, can run with 8+1.  It is definitely different than my 500 and we'll need to practice loading drills to make sure I can keep it fed under stress.  I have gotten pretty good at pulling a shell from a side saddle carrier, dropping it into  the open chamber and racking the slide forward on my 500, but the 930 will take a bit different technique.

One of the things I liked about the 930 SPX was the ghost ring sights.  One of the things I don't like is that it definitely is not the highest quality gun I've ever bought.  It's run flawlessly so far and I have every confidence that it will work when I need it to, but it's not a weapon that you marvel at the beautiful machine work on.  With 12g being as cheap as it is, I intend to exercise the heck out of the thing to see how well it holds up.

Tim

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