Criteria For Rural Living Location

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Morpheus's picture
Morpheus
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Criteria For Rural Living Location

Folks. I could use some help here. And I'm willing to bet that other's have pondered this question too.

I am looking to buy some off-grid rural land to eventually relocate to, plant a garden, raise some chickens and hogs, and live off the grid (via solar energy).

But where??????????

 

Here are some of the criteria that I have developed:

Arable land

Available water

Away from large metro areas (mass exodus could happen)

Politically favorable local politics (for example, Montana has a rich history of strong state's rights and federal defiance)

Price.

Taxes

Tolerable weather

Decent growing season

Away from military bases and/or major federal operations (I have no idea what a SHTF scenario will be like but I don't want to be near these centers of power).

What else? What other criteria should I consider? And are there any regions that you'd recommend? 

I'll bet that I am not the only one pondering this question.

Thanks folks.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

HI Pete,

 

I have been thinking along the same lines. As you point out taxes could be a real issue with the location. Even if you are able to find a good spot that meets the other criteria state and local taxes could be a problem. If taxes went up substantially and you were unable to meet those expense you could lose your property. I have been thinking about states with no income tax. There are a few ; Alaska, Nevada, Wyoming, Texas and a couple others.

I will be following this thread also,

 

Ken

 

 

 

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

In fact, when I read Pete's criteria, the word Texas came front and center in my mind.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

 Just a few thoughts on some of your bullet points:  

Arable land -- throwing out the obviously non-arable (i.e., Brooklyn [et alia] and serious desert areas) most soil can be made to grow edibles.  Some areas of course are better than others (here in the NEast our soil is often quite rocky)  but with raised beds / greenhouses / (or if you want to get hardcore) hydroponics seems to me one way or the other you could raise food.  Which lowers this down the Scale o'Importance (SoI) a couple notches.

Available water -- Again, certain areas are right out (Death Valley, Las Vegas [these days one can be forgiven for confusing the two]) but again with the right (clever) setup, you can probably make do nearly anywhere

Taxes -- factor in that taxes will be changing radically (a) as we get further into economic nightmare and (b) when it becomes clear that having land to grow food, etc., is a popular strategy, property taxes will likely go up-up-up.  And I bet the non-income-tax states make up for that in higher property taxes. 

Tolerable weather -- I'll leave up to you what is tolerable [wry grin]...

Decent growing season -- again, with the right strategy/setup you could make pretty much anything work...

Away from military bases and/or major federal operations (I have no idea what a SHTF scenario will be like but I don't want to be near these centers of power) -- my knowledge here is lacking.  I leave it to others to clue us in.  

The folks at Survivalblog.com have plenty to say on this subject.  But something tells me you're already aware of Mr. JW,R.  

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

 I know of  a place for sale  in North East , Ks .  House , 5+ acres ,well water .  Not solar .. Hooked up to electricity now but  you could pull it. Can not sell back the extra electricity at this time in Ks.    Nearest neighbors about every mile ... town pop 700 people  approx 8 miles...  next town is the  county seat  pop  3300 , 12 miles  .  I bedroom  and bath down stairs  the three up could use updated  last price I heard was $80,000.  not sure what the taxes are  less than $500 I am sure  .   Down falls   are    65 miles from  Army base ., I did not see fruit trees established  nor a creek on the place.   Set up for hogs and chickens .  Maybe a fixer-up barn .   House is getting new roof now.

  I can get you more info .   maybe  Google 1846 2nd rd. Waterville Ks 66548

  Maybe this is not the kind of ifo you wanted  on this site but  maybe otherrs need this sort of Idea what things are going for .

 Diana

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Well Sager here were my success criteria in selecting a location for our hidey-hole in AK

  1. Proximity to population centers and strategic facilities. minimum 90 miles with large rocks between us and them (Denali 20k feet and Murphy Dome 2.2k feet ) prevailing westerly wind towards Fairbanks. I leave it to your imagination(s) as to why this was a criteria
  2. Less hospitable climate (but not too inhospitable), while this makes food growth slightly more difficult, it does make people learn to depend on one another. They're also living a mostly subsistence life, so impact of collapse will be minimal.
  3. Alaskan Native proximity, there are at least 2 tribes of native Alaskan's within a couple of day's walk, they've survived in this area for generations, if things get sticky or we need to fall back to more traditional survival methods.
  4. Degree of security, travelling 120 miles (by trail) in the winter in average -40F temps is not for the faint of heart, and gives a huge deterrence benefit.
  5. Unincorporated land, no property taxes, sales tax is in Alaska, but for staples we'll be self sufficient, also annual dividend for resources taken from AK to the lower 48th amounting to $3000 per person.
  6. Large enough land area to feed many mouths, intiially two, but enough land so that if needs be, we can feed a number of people from 80 acres
  7. Water access, both rainfall, ground and well is available on site. There is potentially a higher than healthy arsenic content in some of the water, so filtering is a must. Water in the winter is not an issue as we get on average 60 inches of snow.
  8. Edible fauna, hunting fishing and local wildlife was a must for supplementation of food supplies
  9. Low overall population, communities must be small to survive, but not too small. Also knowing your neighbors allows you to spot possible interlopers easily.
  10. I like the place, this may seem trivial, but its actually incredibly important, you'll likely be spending the rest of your life there.
  11. Building materials available on site, the lot, and surrounding areas are forested, providing two advantages, cover, and building materials on site so minimal import of lumber and other supplies needed.
  12. Heating fuel locally available, wood heating standard, for carbon neutral heating.
  13. High Sun availability, in the summer southern facing Sun is effective (with trackers) for power generation for 7-8 kW at an affordable price, wind only in winter will drop this to about 4kW. Although I am considering steam water expansion through a turbine power generation too for additional power in the winter
  14. Just down the road there are volcanic hot springs, which currently grow grapes in the summer, while this might be nice, post collapse, this can be used for early starting of tomatoes, and possibly all year citrus growth and maintenance, also we could leverage these for hot water, and potentially power generation too..

I'm sure there are other things too, that I've missed out, if I remember I'll add them to the list.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

sorry double post

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

the southeast is the ideal location.

in imho arkansas is the best .

anyone interested can back channel me

i have lived here for 34 years.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

I agree with most of the criteria with variations for location.  

My only caution about this is that it takes some time to be able to become self sufficient.  This is no quick fix.

When a new garden is planted,  it necessarily upsets the environment for a while and it takes a lot of watching and learning before one becomes very efficient, and you don't get something for nothing.

People ask me to show them how to grow vegetables, and I can,  but it isn't an exact science and takes a lot of learning   (read about permaculture here    http://www.holmgren.com.au/html/Writings/essence.html#principals     and click on 12 permaculture principles)...  it is all time consuming, though very rewarding.  

Subsistance farming,  for that is what we are talking about,  is quite hard work.  Growing enough for yourself (alone) is one thing,  but for a family is a lot of work.  That is why young people had to work harder in the past. 

It depends upon how urgent the situation is as well as how perfect the venue... and there is no such thing as the perfect place.

I wish everyone well in their adventures, for that is what we are living... in interesting times.

 

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Hi Pete-

 I had been thinking about what crieria were important for where one chose to live as well.   One criteria that came to mind  was:

- Receptiveness of locals to newcomers (the openess of the existing community to new members).

I was thinking how people moving to rural areas to get away from the city might not even think about this.  But it can be very different from one rural place to another.

E.g.,  I live in a fairly rural area, and I have observed new people move in and get accepted fine, based on their personal merits.  A continuous inflow and outflow of people over the years has been normal, as well as there being a large subset of people whose families have been around for a couple of generations. People know this person's mother or father, or went to school with that person's uncle.  I have always felt the building and existence of those kinds of ties was a positive family-oriented aspect of my area. 

On the other hand, I have a friend who lives in a small town in another state that is mostly composed of families that have lived there for multiple generations.  Even after living there for many, many years, and raising a family there, I was surprised to discover she still feels like an outsider.  She's accepted and treated well, because she is a good person, and has been a strong member of the community, and has raised a family there.  But she is still not a "local". 

So if you want to become part of a rural community and not just move to one, this may be a criterion that you want to take into consideration, investigate and assess.

 

Another criterion that I think may be worth considering is:

- A community that has demonstrated it has heart and cares about others.  E.g., our local community takes pride in being strong supporters of various annual events for good causes, and does so with a big heart, well beyond what one might expect from a small community.  It can't be a bad thing to be a part of a such a community when neighbors find that they truly need to pull together and help each other, either.

Finally, I think Chris mentioned a number of criteria that he and Becca took into consideration when they moved to their current location.  If someone knows where they are listed, they would make a good addition to this thread!

 

 

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Excellent stuff. I knew that I wasn't the only one twisting my brain over this.

Keep it coming!!

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Typically igneous rocks produce better soil than sedimentary. Go for granite rather than sand stone.

Gungir said it, trees. Firewood and lots of it. Get a lucas bushmill and if you have hardwood then you have an awesome supply of building materials.

Cattle country as a neighbour doesn't hurt. You can use the manure as fertilizer. If you really want to produce your own natural gas you can make methane from the manure.

Move somewhere that has established farms. It's easy to trade / barter if your neighbours actually produce something.

Fencing is a long and hard task. It is expensive to pay someone to do it. Getting a place that is already fenced is a bonus.

If the summers are hot, get a place that has a swimming pool / swimming hole.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
nigel wrote:

Typically igneous rocks produce better soil than sedimentary. Go for granite rather than sand stone.

Gungir said it, trees. Firewood and lots of it. Get a lucas bushmill and if you have hardwood then you have an awesome supply of building materials.

Cattle country as a neighbour doesn't hurt. You can use the manure as fertilizer. If you really want to produce your own natural gas you can make methane from the manure.

Move somewhere that has established farms. It's easy to trade / barter if your neighbours actually produce something.

Fencing is a long and hard task. It is expensive to pay someone to do it. Getting a place that is already fenced is a bonus.

If the summers are hot, get a place that has a swimming pool / swimming hole.

Great stuff. Firewood did cross my mind. What about well water? I'd think that one would not want to have to drill 600 feet to find potable water.

Also, can you elaborate more on soil quality? I am gardening my condo patio to gain practice. Growing up we had a 60x60 ft garden in Western NY where the soil was a few feet of high grade topsoil followed by 4 feet of clay. I know that soil quality is critical.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

  I would be looking at a place that already has the good old boy system intact .   One where you can go to the local Coop , coffee shop or hardware store and find out any info you might need .    For instance if you buy grain for your animals by the bag you spend $7 for 40 pound bag ... if you go to a coop that delivers you can get it for $4 a bushel  ... depending on price of each  grain.   If you have a neighbor harvesting he can stop by your place and fill the grain bin  for trade of another favor  .   They will plow your garden  bring you manure and provide the straw if you bake them cinnamon rolls  .

 A well can be dug for under $4000.   but a natural spring would be a bonus in my book .  

  In rural areas you can get as involved in the community as you want  or stay to yourself and people will leave you be .  However do expect to be the topic of conversation at the coffee shop and everywhere as you are something new.

   If you do not plan to home school  check out the school systems .. they vary .   But as a rule the country ones have better  academics  and teacher to student ratio.   Any  place you need to know your kids friends .... A lot of pressure on them to join in on Partying .

 Anytime you can get a place that has established out buildings will save you time and money .  The house is not quite as important because you need to make it your own anyway .

 When you get  to your new place get the County paper  .. look for auctions . When the elderly pass on the family sells their old things this is where you pick up cheap tools , crocks, woodstoves most anything  any homesteader needs .  Be willing to take a whole box of junk for $.50  just to get the one garden tool  you want .  Do not come in city clothes .. Key overalls are widely accepted .. any Jeans will work .

 Mostly try to fit in . Be willing to pull the neighbor kids truck out of the mud ... and chase his bull back home .

  I would be finding a place as soon as you can afford it .  Jobs would be the only thing  holding me back right now .. even then I would  consider getting  the family  there and commute  if need be . Good luck all ...

Diana

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Pete,

I live in western NY.  Our well is about 25 ft deep, but there are springs all over the place that can be useful.  Soils maps show my property being mostly covered with "gravelly loam" which turns out to be good garden soil.  The entire area was glaciated so there is a lot of glacial till, meaning you get a variety of kinds and sizes of rocks.  Depending on concentrations, digging and tilling can be problems unless you have heavier machinery than I have. 

There is a low area on my property that, as it turns out, was tiled a few generations ago, but still supports wetland vegetation.  The soil in that spot is clay, created by millenia of being covered with water.  I dug a spring fed pond there.  It never goes very low.  A neighbor's pond that isn't dug in an already wet area went down about 8 ft during a recent dry spell while mine went down about a foot at most.  The pond in near the garden if I should need water in really dry times.

Other considerations, particularly if you're in a forested or hilly area, are exposure to the south for sun and satellite, and to the west for prevailing winds.

Oh yeh, about firewood.  I don't know how old you are, but I'm 62 and cutting, hauling, splitting and stacking firewood is hard work.  I was getting most of mine out of my woods, but it was taking a toll not only on me but my garden tractor as well.  So, this year I've compromised and spent the money to have a load of logs delivered.  For about $700 a load provides about 20 face cords, enough to heat my house for at least 2 years.  The logs were delivered next to my wood shed, so I can cut, split and stack it with little transportation required.  With the price of firewood going up, it may be wise to get a few loads to be prepared for several years into the future if you have the room.

Of course New York, as I'm sure you're aware from living here, is a high tax area.  But living in a poor rural region of the state helps as property and local taxes aren't as high as in other areas, and we have an Amish community nearby where you can barter for agricultural goods and a variety of services such as construction and sawmilling.  We are in the lee of Lake Erie, which, in addition to delivering a lot of snow, also tends to moderate temperatures in both the winter and summer.  The climate is very mild with few extremes except snow, for which most people are prepared.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Hi folks,

This topic has occupied much of my thought for many years so please let me add my 2 cents worth.

Water, soil, community, and available daylight/sunlight are pretty important. One issue with much of Texas is the amount of available water in areas where land prices aren't very high. I guess it all depends on how much food raising you think you will need to do...west of Austin and just north of San Antonio and to the west, they have been experiencing a 50-year drought. This is a cyclic pattern that seems to be intensifying. (Not to mention there are probably 15 million or more people in an area reaching from Austin to San Antonio to Dallas/Forth Worth to Houston. That is a LOT of people. What are they going to do when the Edwards and Oglala Aquifers run too low to pump??)

When you have to drill a new well through granite bedrock, (that may be 1000 ft. or more down to water (no guarantees)) that can be very expensive. Look for live water (creeks and springs) and surface water (ponds, preferably spring-fed) or get yourself a decent windmill with spare parts. Again, preferably on a hill or higher ground so you can gravity feed that water to your house or to livestock tanks or ponds.

We farm, and you may think soil is not that important, but the health of the soil dictates the health of your plants, which in turn has a lot to do with animal/human health. If you are interested in an area, check out the soil trace mineral content. If it's low in selenium or boron, for example, (or waay too high) you may have some livestock and plant health issues. In the U.S. I highly recommend ATTRA (Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas) as a source of information (it's free--they will research a topic for you-- and it's one of the best uses of taxpayers' money I know of).

So any decent amount of soil you can start with is a blessing, no matter how big your place is. And think first about amending that soil with whatever it needs as soon as you get there. Especially as some soil amendments like the rock dusts take time--can be expensive and who knows how long transportation will be available to ship bulkier items? Also look for local sources of soil nutrients. I had a friend who used to get lake weeds dumped on her small farm acres. Took a while to break down enough to turn under and the flies were a bit of a mess, but it was free and made great soil additions. And plant perennials first (grapes, berry bushes, fruit trees, nut trees, perennial herbs...) Sounds simplistic but they do take a couple to a more than a few years to produce. Who knows how long we have?

Here is ATTRA's site  http://attra.ncat.org/

James Wesley, Rawles on survivalblog.com has put together a listing and rating of states using very similar categories that Pete in Florida listed at the beginning. You can see the ratings on his web site -- which attracts people not a whole different from many here at the Chris Martenson community. Little like stumbling on Aaron's gun thread first, but that doesn't bother me at all. I have acted on advice and info regarding gun purchases from both Aaron's Definitive Gun thread as well as survivalblog.

The comments already made about community are well-stated and important. No matter how far away you can get, you will still need other people at some point. Preferably they will be neighbors you can work with and in a community that cares. 'Nuff said. You all already nailed that one down.

Sunlight--hard to grow plants without it. You need as many growing degree days as you can get without torching yourself and your plants (i.e. someone mentioned Sonoran desert?) Sunlight is also useful if you invest in photovoltaics or wish to heat with passive solar.

I have to side with joe2baba. The Southeast has a lot of characteristics that seem pretty good. Watch the prevailing wind and weather patterns, though. Tornado Alley is not much fun. Montana also has a lot going for it. Parts of Texas...cheap land in parts of Kansas no doubt about it. Upstate and western NY looked really good, too, till I looked at property taxes...my goodness! I am sure there are pockets of places and communities in a lot of states and locations that meet a lot of the criteria.

We have been looking for a number of years for a place that meets most of the criteria Pete mentioned. We've made a detour or two--have an existing family farm in the wrong location that does throw a monkey wrench in the works but we are working through that one.

Best of luck to all of us. At least we are keeping ourselves engaged and are learning from each other.

There are communities of place, communities of interest, and communities of affliation/values. Best of all worlds is when those come together. Seems like there are a lot of like-minded people here in Chris's site. Best path to community.

cheers,

Juli B

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Nice post Julie.

The better soil is in areas formed by volcanoes. An old dormant volcanoe is usually the best type of soil. Look for granite / blue metal / basalt rocks. Sandstone and limestone can be ok.

I would go to a second hand book shop and look for a geology book for the area you want to buy in.

Having said all that, one farmer with the wrong practices can damage soil. Get soil sample tests of the land you want to buy. I had a cousin who bought land that was unusable due to the heavy chemicals in the soil.

It is possible to regenerate the soil and land. Certain plants and trees will replace nitrogen, eg nettle, and wattle. I am next to a cattle farm( and I have a few). So I get an unlimited supply of manure which can fertilize my garden.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

My first criteria would be not in the USA......

Mike

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
Doug wrote:

Pete,

I live in western NY.  Our well is about 25 ft deep, but there are springs all over the place that can be useful.  Soils maps show my property being mostly covered with "gravelly loam" which turns out to be good garden soil.  The entire area was glaciated so there is a lot of glacial till, meaning you get a variety of kinds and sizes of rocks.  Depending on concentrations, digging and tilling can be problems unless you have heavier machinery than I have. 

There is a low area on my property that, as it turns out, was tiled a few generations ago, but still supports wetland vegetation.  The soil in that spot is clay, created by millenia of being covered with water.  I dug a spring fed pond there.  It never goes very low.  A neighbor's pond that isn't dug in an already wet area went down about 8 ft during a recent dry spell while mine went down about a foot at most.  The pond in near the garden if I should need water in really dry times.

Other considerations, particularly if you're in a forested or hilly area, are exposure to the south for sun and satellite, and to the west for prevailing winds.

Oh yeh, about firewood.  I don't know how old you are, but I'm 62 and cutting, hauling, splitting and stacking firewood is hard work.  I was getting most of mine out of my woods, but it was taking a toll not only on me but my garden tractor as well.  So, this year I've compromised and spent the money to have a load of logs delivered.  For about $700 a load provides about 20 face cords, enough to heat my house for at least 2 years.  The logs were delivered next to my wood shed, so I can cut, split and stack it with little transportation required.  With the price of firewood going up, it may be wise to get a few loads to be prepared for several years into the future if you have the room.

Of course New York, as I'm sure you're aware from living here, is a high tax area.  But living in a poor rural region of the state helps as property and local taxes aren't as high as in other areas, and we have an Amish community nearby where you can barter for agricultural goods and a variety of services such as construction and sawmilling.  We are in the lee of Lake Erie, which, in addition to delivering a lot of snow, also tends to moderate temperatures in both the winter and summer.  The climate is very mild with few extremes except snow, for which most people are prepared.

Clarence NY born and raised for my first 24 years. (I'm 42)

I know WNY. What town are you from? 

Go Bills!

 

BTW. I have handguns and evil looking carbines with politically incorrect cosmetic features (i.e AKM-47).

I'd be burned at the stake in WNY for that. So, that region is ruled out. Otherwise it's a beautiful place with great people.

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Pete,

You lived in the wrong neighborhood.  Clarence is refined and has money.  I live in Cattaraugus Co., otherwise known as the north end of Appalachia.  Your guns would fit in real well here.  Shoot as many deer as you want, the damn things want to share my garden.

If you get back to the area, look me up.  It'd be nice to have a beer and discuss some of this stuff that the locals seem to be oblivious to.  I try to share, but most of them just think I'm a little wierder than they thought I was before, which is saying something.

I hope you find some place nice.

doug

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Of course. Pete could buy 500 acres, sell 5 acres to a hundred of us on here, we could have our community with a cute town square and a public park. I would run for mayor, lose by a landslide and be pi*sed at all of you.....

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
jerrydon10 wrote:

Of course. Pete could buy 500 acres, sell 5 acres to a hundred of us on here, we could have our community with a cute town square and a public park. I would run for mayor, lose by a landslide and be pi*sed at all of you.....

Or...win by a landslide, and be pi$$ed at all of us...

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
Doug wrote:

Pete,

You lived in the wrong neighborhood.  Clarence is refined and has money.  I live in Cattaraugus Co., otherwise known as the north end of Appalachia.  Your guns would fit in real well here.  Shoot as many deer as you want, the damn things want to share my garden.

If you get back to the area, look me up.  It'd be nice to have a beer and discuss some of this stuff that the locals seem to be oblivious to.  I try to share, but most of them just think I'm a little wierder than they thought I was before, which is saying something.

I hope you find some place nice.

doug

My uncle lives on Franklinville. I LOVE Cattaraugus County. Doug, I'm in Ft. Lauderdale now but would love to get away from the cattle and live among cows. LOL

BTW. I lived in the rural portion of Clarence.We were the unrefined with not a lot of money folks. ;) Clarence became really rich after I moved away.

Is it still shotgun only in Catt Co.? 

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

I am a licensed real eatate broker in arkansas. have been since 1985. I specialze in rural property.

if any of you are serious about a piece of property that meets all the above criteria back channel me. i have a piece that is 275 acres with 2 miles of  kings river frontage bluffs and incredible views. soil you can grow anything in and plenty of pasture. hydro power is very possible. water is supplied by springs. so off the grid can be a reality. it is breathtaking and magical.

it is an ideal place for a community.

i can provide a dvd to serious inquiries

om shanti

joe

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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
joe2baba wrote:

I am a licensed real eatate broker in arkansas. have been since 1985. I specialze in rural property.

if any of you are serious about a piece of property that meets all the above criteria back channel me. i have a piece that is 275 acres with 2 miles of  kings river frontage bluffs and incredible views. soil you can grow anything in and plenty of pasture. hydro power is very possible. water is supplied by springs. so off the grid can be a reality. it is breathtaking and magical.

it is an ideal place for a community.

i can provide a dvd to serious inquiries

om shanti

joe

What kind of price does a piece like that go for? And do you accept Federal Reserve Notes?

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Farmer Brown
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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

 

Pete wrote:

 And do you accept Federal Reserve Notes?

You just made me laugh out loud.  That doesn't usually happen to me when there's nobody around - thanks!  

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ccpetersmd
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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Pete,

For what its worth, I'd recommend considering the midwest. I grew up in Kansas (wheat country) and currently live in Iowa (corn and soybean country). Much of the midwest has great soil, abundant water, and a great growing season. The winters can be harsh in the northern zones, but that is the time to spend reading and playing cards (Euchre, here in Iowa) if you are a farmer, like my father-in-law. The people here are generally very nice, welcoming to outsiders, and practical by nature. I've lived in a lot of places, to include Hawaii, Georgia and Colorado, to mention a few. While I miss the ocean and the mountains, there is something very comfortable about living in the midwest.

Christopher

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Doug
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Posts: 3159
Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

Pete,

Yeh, Catt Co is nice.  BTW, there are several CSA's in business within easy reach these days.

They began allowing rifles in the past couple years.  I gotta say it makes me a little nervous.  I live on the shoulder of a pretty big hill, within rifle range of a gun club (these days euphemistically called conservation clubs) on top of the hill.  But, everyone I know still hunts with shotguns and/or bows.

Vacant land prices around here run about $1,000/acre, up from $300 dollars 17 years ago when I bought.  We're beginning to see more homes springing up particularly on land with a nice view.  I've got a feeling when water woes begin affecting the southwest, people will start migrating back here.

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joe2baba
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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location

as i said if you are interested back channel me.

 

when i bought my 142 acres in 1974 we came across a guy who would only take gold or silver for his land. check the charts and see how much it appreciated since then

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pinecarr
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Re: Criteria For Rural Living Location
SagerXX wrote:
 
jerrydon10 wrote:

 

Of course. Pete could buy 500 acres, sell 5 acres to a hundred of us on here, we could have our community with a cute town square and a public park. I would run for mayor, lose by a landslide and be pi*sed at all of you.....

 

 

Or...win by a landslide, and be pi$$ed at all of us...



Too funny!  I'm with SagerXX abd voting for jerrydon10!

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