Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

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cstone's picture
cstone
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Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

Home schooling is not an option for us because we both work. We are implementing many of the "What Should I Do?" suggestions, but what about preparing our children with the skills and knowledge they will need in a world greatly different from today? Any suggestions on topics and skills we can develop inaddition to the reading, writing and arithmetic our children receive from the public schools?

Poet's picture
Poet
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Posts: 1891
Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

Some of your questions were addressed in the thread "Dealing With a Reluctant Partner" started by Becca Martenson:
http://www.peakprosperity.com/blog/dealing-reluctant-partner/49618

Woodman had a good comment on kids, which I'll quote:

Woodman wrote:

With kids, I generally find the right time to educate them is to give accurate information when they ask, up to the amount that satisfies their current level of interest.  Mine are still young, but they are regularly involved in the lifestyle I am trying to develop of more simplicity, frugality, and self reliance.  Will they still get up at 6AM to run out in 15 F weather to open the chicken coop when they are teenagers is still to be seen, but at least they getting a sense of the energy and effort that goes into necessities of life others might just take for granted.

Tom

Full Moon, also has written good information with details as well:

Full Moon wrote:

 The children I have left at home are 13,14,16 ,&19   .    We do not sugar coat anything .  I tell them they are learning to garden and raise animals because it is cheaper and they will need to know it well enough to teach it to their children .

 We study history and the other countries collapsing .  We  teach fishing , hunting,  survival skills and can shoot  better than I .They know how make soap , can and dehydrate food  , make  butter ,yogurt  & cheese . To make herbal medicine and Identify the plants . They know how to shear the sheep , wash the wool, card it spin ,  felt ,and crochet it .  They know how to care for the animals and to butcher them .  They care for the bee hive and harvest the honey  . They cut the wood , take care of the stove, and run the generator .  They know how to ride their horses like the wind .   Hey they even cut each others hair ! They know that they will not be going to college .  My library is full and for now the Internet is available .

 They Know they may well have to depend on each other .   If I do not have patience they have grandparents  down the road that help teach some things . They have helped teach their nephews to bake pumpkin seeds and make baby food for the little sister .

   They have no fear or anxiety ... they are  young .  They have very few needs .  If you do not have much  you can not loose much .  They know how to get to town on Sat. night and have a good time with their friends .

 Honestly  Kids just want  to spend time with you . They will learn from doing . The younger you start the better.

In the end, it's not about scaring them into preparing and learning. It's teaching by doing, and "doing self-reliance" in skills so they learn to be confident in themselves and their ablity to tackle whatever life throws at them.

Poet

aggrivated's picture
aggrivated
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Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

If you are in farming country, the 4H clubs do offer hands on training for kids and adults.  Also, in the city,getting involved in an urban gardening project or just a back yard/ patio/ balcony garden is great training.  I took one of my god children to an agricultural fair not long ago where he got to milk a goat.  The thing that surprised him the most was that the milk was warm!  Sometimes we don't have a clue how deep the basic assumptions run for those of us raised in our insulated world.

akamai mom's picture
akamai mom
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Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

cstone:  How old are your kids?  The grade school ages are a really receptive age to teach skill building in the garden, the kitchen or in nature. There are a host of films that teach the limitations of the earth's resources that can be grasped at 9, 10, 11 like Flow, or Food, Inc.  Just shifting your own life intention away from the trappings of modern society, role models the most important lessons to a young child.  They learn best when you are teaching them in a happy way about putting fruit in the dehydrator or experimenting with making cheese from whole, plain yoghurt strained through cheese cloth.  (Amazingly easy.)  For any age, experiencing any aspect of self-sufficiency is the best non-threatening learning experience.  As you gain more knowledge, and rely on the doctor less; by extension, they do the same.

I run a small group home school, and have been highly involved in the public school process, so I may be able to give you a stronger answer if I knew the ages of your children and what environment you live in; urban rural, cold, warm, desert, etc.

My young teen sons have an easy time learning about the past or the virtual world without fear, and I use that as a platform to launch discussions.  They tune me out or get scared if I bombard them with too many Alex Jones films or the like about our impending collapse of an open society.  They are very much at an age to be fielding the political and economic discussions.  My experience is 12 years is the early threshold for understanding these themes.  I think the lessons for younger children need to be focused on skill building only in the context of joyful adventure.

With my teens, we intentionally watch a cluster of historic feature films like Amistad, Elizabeth, The Last Emperor, Princess Kaiulani,  (there are plenty of violent ones like Braveheart, Troy, etc.  for parents who can enjoy a harsh story.)  I prefer stories with young protagonists , so they can identify with the need to be responsible at a young age.  Empire of the Sun is a good story about the transition in China from the perspective of a young, spoiled boy.  I discuss the films and their implications, like what happens as a very young king or queen, with manipulative/guiding ministers all around them? What makes an effective ruler? What is common in these stories?  Civil wars are even more common than external ones.  ...Historically there is always a power struggle over resources and who has to do the hard work.  Almost always a win for peace for one community results in a greater amount of work with less resources for another.  This casual observation is hard to deny; the evidence is everywhere.  Boys video games have multiple opportunities to demonstrate the connection, especially the role playing games.

The present is no exception to this dynamic.  I let them know that power struggle is continuous and happening all around us.  Everything in the high tech world is accelerating  and so are the transfers of powers and the duration of empires.  I demonstrate how we truly do have an American empire.  For my video game enthusiast, I frame elements like airport scanners or internet monitoring as tools for one side or the other.  It is important to be vigilant to understanding what is really happening around them, and how do they strategize for their best success.

My older son is now attending a college prep high school that is a great preparation for succeeding in our dominant culture (as it exists today) in a responsible manner.  I wish it were more conscious of the Crash Course scenario.  (I have sent the links to key people and educators at the school.)  For that son, I regularly remind him of the importance of planning for a future right on this island with skills that are meaningful in our physical community.  My younger, home schooled son, is more my involved partner in resilience skill building.  He helps make PM decisions, and is helping build our ferro-cement, rain water fed fish pond for food this week.  I have to imagine the older son is grasping my message by just living in a household that is trying our best to help our own bodies, the island and the planet, by creating as much as we can for ourselves in our own backyard on ambient sun and rain.  The short version of our story:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjXfpJZGlog

I wish you all the best.  Let me know if I can help.

Poet's picture
Poet
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Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

Akamai mom:

I watched the video and visited your web site (www.akamaibackyard.com). Thank you for your inspiring words and the video and site. Mahalo!

Poet

akamai mom's picture
akamai mom
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Posts: 43
Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

Thank you, Poet.  Happy Holidays!

Rojelio's picture
Rojelio
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Posts: 38
Re: Children Preparation--knowledge skill requirements

I'm not sure about your situation with both of you working. But John M Greer had an excellent blogpost last year in which he suggested that the second job is often not worth the extra financial effort. Given all of the costs of commuting, child care etc...it may be more worthwhile for one of the breadwinners (wife or husband) to stay home and work on the "home economy." That is gardening, food preparation, cooking to reduce food bills and so on while at the same time decreasing the external costs required to maintain the outside job. Something to think about.....

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
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Posts: 3998
the Finnish school system

MUST WATCH......  This will blow your bubbles!

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
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Posts: 1258
unschooling

DTM  , In USA  we call it Unschooling .  Many do it and are very happy with it .

 FM

tictac1's picture
tictac1
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Joined: Sep 25 2009
Posts: 175
Conquer the fear, have the

Conquer the fear, have the parent that makes the least quit their job and homeschool.  Where there is a will, there's a way.

Barring that, teach your children reading comprehension.  Public schools fail at this miserably.

The whole world of knowledge is available to those with excellent reading skills.  With Google, an sharp kid can research almost any subject, at a college or professional level, without leaving their home.

Those who do not excel in comprehension are subject to legal problems and scams of all sorts (like fiat money!), plus they will be dependent on someone else teaching them if they cannot do it for themselves.

The other thing I think is important is developing a work ethic.  My kids have never gotten allowances, they pick chores from the "big board" and get paid for them.  We also do not buy them anything except food and clothing.  They buy their own bikes, helmets, games, etc.  My 10 year old just bought his own digital camera (he loves photography and Photoshop).  Not only do they not mind this, they seem to really enjoy going to the store with THEIR money.  My oldest (12 years) is fully aware this is not how the "other kids" do it, and she doesn't mind because she is aware of the value of work ethic.

If you want to see just how stupid public schooling has made our children, pick up a copy of New England Primer or the early McGuffey Reader, and see what they expected young children to read, understand and memorize.  I know adults that would struggle with the material.

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