Cancer Cure gets small coverage

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jneo's picture
jneo
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Cancer Cure gets small coverage

I was listening to a local talk show that brought up this story and I was amazed by it.  I was also shocked how it got NO MAINSTREAM coverage, but no real surprise there.  

If it does turn out to be a Cure, will they let it out or will it be put on the shelves and collect dust?  One caller made the comment that, they do not want people living an extra 2-3 decades, that means they are gonna collect social security.  

What are the downfalls of people living longer was another issue attached to the show based on the Cure being put into practice.

My answer was.  We are willing to let people die of cancer for the sake of saving a failing monetary system?  How inhumane.  

 

Dr. Kalafatis laboratory is actively involved in cancer research.  Over $5 billion is invested annually by the Federal government alone in research to cure cancer,  and a significant number of researchers are working tirelessly to think about what to do with these abnormal cells.  How do they develop?  Are we born with them or do they grow over time?  Can you get rid of them?  Can you stop them from turning deadly?  The questions are endless.  Dr. Kalafatis believes he has found an answer and that it is possible to kill abnormal cancer cells without damaging the surrounding healthy cells.  Dr. Kalafatis has discovered a unique application for a substance he calls CancerX, that has consistently shown promise in extinguishing cancer.  Initially, Dr. Kalafatis tested his hypothesis on seven different types of cancer cells in vitro:  leukemia cells, breast cancer cells, skin cancer cells, renal cancer cells, brain cancer cells, and prostrate cancer cells.   In all seven cases, CancerX killed the abnormal cancer cells.  He then moved to in vivo testing (using laboratory mice).  In collaboration with scientists from the Taussig Cancer Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Kalafatis has achieved reduction and eradication of seven different types of human cancer cells implanted in mice (xenografts).  More recently, experiments using glioblastoma cells, demonstrated that the brain tumor growth was substantially reduced in mice xenografts within 20 days of administering the drug directly into the tumor. In all cases CancerX killed the cancer cells, but it did not kill the mice and did not affect the surrounding tissues. This means that the synthetic chemical is non-toxic, killing the cancer cell but not impacting healthy cells.   

Dr. Kalafatis, who has been researching cancer antidotes for the past four years, submitted his findings to the Developmental Therapeutic Program (DTP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the NIH to independently substantiate his evidence.  The first two rounds of tests achieved successful results on 52 different strains of human cancer cells.

idoctor's picture
idoctor
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ccpetersmd's picture
ccpetersmd
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Posts: 799
Re: Cancer Cure gets small coverage

The following link will take you to a patent by Dr. Kalafatis in 2009 that I suspect details the substance, CancerX, mentioned in this report:

http://www.faqs.org/patents/inv/350564

If my assumption that the above patent relates to CancerX is accurate, this is simply another in a fairly long line of kinase inhibitors that have already found use in the treatment of some cancers. The following link will take you to a scientific review of kinase inhibitors for the treatment of cancer:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/586304

If my assumption is correct, it is possible that Dr. Kalafatis' discovery may prove very useful, but will likely not be a "cure". Even if my assumption is not correct, and that CancerX is an entirely different type of medication, it is still not likely that it will prove a "cure". Cancer is not one thing, amenable to a single type of treatment. Cancers differ greatly depending upon tissue of origin, degree of loss of normal differentiation from their tissue of origin, etc.

I am not a cancer researcher or an oncologist (although I do perform surgery for some types of cancer), but I would be extremely skeptical of any claim of a single "cure" for a disease that is in fact not one disease, but many.

ccpetersmd's picture
ccpetersmd
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 12 2008
Posts: 799
Re: Cancer Cure gets small coverage

Sorry, I forgot that not everyone has Medscape access, so here is a short review article on kinase inhibitors:

http://www.cancerquest.org/index.cfm?page=404

And, a longer article that discusses some of the therapeutic kinase inhibitors (albeit from 2005):

http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/315/3/971.full

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