Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

12 posts / 0 new
Last post
fritzroy15's picture
fritzroy15
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 4 2008
Posts: 14
Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

This link was posted in the "Stay Current" section and it really stunned me, can you really buy a house in detroit with less then 100$ which are the latest page of this site:???

http://www.realtor.com/search/searchresults.aspx?srcnt=230&sid=0a04b8c82...

 There has to be a catch, right? 

Morpheus's picture
Morpheus
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 27 2008
Posts: 1200
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

Median home price in my hometown Buffalo, NY is under 100K. Gorgeous homes for 150K. Honest.

In fact, the housing bubble as I understand it never took root there. The city is economically depressed and has been for 35 years or so.

In fact folks, that's a well kept secret, Buffalo. "The City of Good Neighbors" (cited in USATODAY) because it is one of the few remaining significantly sized regions where neighbors mean something.

It's not unusual to see a 15 year old kid shovel his frail elderly neighbors driveway at 7am after finishing his. And only ask for a cup of cocoa in return.

Not a bad hideout for a crash. They are really good folks up there and they are used to hardship so they'll roll with it better than almost anyone. And team together to get through it.

Just don't be self-centered and rude. Because then people in the neighborhoods won't want anything to do with you. Seriously. Like Norman Rockwell America.

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?
MGhandi wrote:

Median home price in my hometown Buffalo, NY is under 100K. Gorgeous homes for 150K. Honest.

That's because in the winter they're all igloos!  Wink

bwk's picture
bwk
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 26 2008
Posts: 7
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

 

eh, buy the house, and the lot next door, you'll want to build a large multi level greenhouse for the winter months. Doesn't Buffalo get like 2-4 ft of lake effect snow in winter?

 I already chimed in on the Detroit thread - http://www.peakprosperity.com/blog/daily-digest-dec-30/10866

 Good news, Detroit doesn't get lake effect snow, bad is high insurance, high taxes. I did read about Urban Farming where in some spots such large blocks of land have become available some of the ravaged communities left behind are trying mini-farms.

 

 

bruin36's picture
bruin36
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 4 2008
Posts: 48
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

I think Buffalo and the entire upstate New York "Rust Belt" recieved unprecedented snow two years ago, over six feet fell in a week.

I agree that Bufalo was never involved in the housing bubble, in fact my friend just sold a house there for nearly full asking price in less than 2 weeks. The housing stock in Bufalo is incredible and I love the City - the one thing that concerns me about the area is all the contaminated brownfield sites - a lot of military labs, atomic and chemical stuff went on there.

 

fritzroy15's picture
fritzroy15
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 4 2008
Posts: 14
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

Is it just me or did everyone miss out on the question? Like the prices right there are not 100 grand, they are 100$, like one hundred dollars. That's really what I was asking, is that price real? Can you really buy a 3Bed. 1 Bath house with 100$?

 Furthermore there are even some that are listed for 40$ and such that why it's a bit mind boggling for me?

emdiaz's picture
emdiaz
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 23 2008
Posts: 25
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?

The idea is that you buy the house for $1 but you have to make it livable and approved by the city. In one of the pictures you can see that most of the houses in the same block have the windows and door cover with plywood. 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
The future has arrived in Detroit

Farms Take Root in Detroit's Foreclosures

by Charla Bear

 
Boarded-up house in Detroit
Charla Bear/NPR

Urban Farming helped turn this empty lot in Detroit into a garden with neat rows of collard greens and tomatoes.

 
 
 
Eric Parrish
Charla Bear, NPR

Eric
Parrish has lived in Detroit for more than 15 years. He says he
recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn
things around in his city.

 
 

Morning Edition, June 11, 2008 · Wayne County, Mich. — home to Detroit — has been hit especially hard by the mortgage crisis.

The
county has inherited thousands of unwanted properties, leaving plot
after plot of vacant land. So a nonprofit group pitched an idea: Take
that unused land, and grow food for the needy.

This year, the
group — called Urban Farming — will take 20 derelict properties in
Wayne County, then pull weeds, lay fresh topsoil, and plant fruits and
vegetables.

The gardens aren't fenced off, so anyone can wander
through and take their pick — for free. Any leftover produce is donated
to food banks.

'A Huge Boon'

Neighborhoods
in Wayne County are littered with boarded-up homes and vacant land
that's covered in knee-high grass. Demolished apartment complexes have
left empty lots the size of football fields.

That's why Urban
Farming founder Taja Seville says Detroit was the perfect place to
start working on farming projects. The city has long suffered from a
glut of available property, and last year it topped the nation in
foreclosures. Wayne County now has about 7,000 idle plots. Seville saw
that as an opportunity.

"I've lived in L.A., N.Y., Connecticut,
London, Minneapolis, and been around a lot, seen a lot of cities. But
I've never seen these long stretches of unused land," says Seville.

Under the 20-plot pilot program, volunteers will tend the garden, and the city of Detroit will pitch in water.

Wayne County Treasurer Raymond Wojtowicz says that's a huge boon.

"It
won't cost the county anything. We're donating the land. If a person
wants to purchase the lot, it will be for sale. Perhaps it will be an
inducement," says Wojtowicz.

'I Want to Garden There'

Wojtowicz
says the biggest benefit, though, is less blight in the neighborhood.
And residents say that, unlike abandoned houses, the gardens aren't
targeted by vandals.

Detroit resident Eric Parrish says that
those who live around the gardens respect the farming projects. "They
see we're doing something to help the community," he says.

Parrish says he recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn things around in his city.

"You can tell people are struggling. So when I do see these plots of land it makes me say, 'I want to garden there,' " he says.

Parrish says most people are grateful for the gardens, although at first a few were concerned they would attract pests.

Turns out that urban farms do
attract people, says Gail Carr, one of Detroit's city managers. She has
houses boarded up nearly every day and sees what a dramatic difference
the gardens have on communities.

"People are coming out of
their homes who wouldn't come out under other circumstances because
they didn't think there was still a community or a neighbor or a
friendly person nearby," she says.

Wojtowicz says the county is watching the program and hopes to expand it.

Seville isn't waiting to expand. She plans to plant hundreds of gardens in at least a dozen other struggling cities this season.

bwk's picture
bwk
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 26 2008
Posts: 7
Re: The future has arrived in Detroit
Yeah, that's it! 
 
There's also a movement in the St. Paul, Minn area, Milwaukee, Chicago, and the Growing Power collective. 
 
http://www.gardenworksmn.org/ 
 
http://www.growingpower.org/about_us.htm
 
Nice to see children can finally re-connect with where food comes from, and that people are seeing a return the earth as source. 
 
Thank you for digging them gem up!
 
 
bwk's picture
bwk
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 26 2008
Posts: 7
Re: Can you really buy a house for less than 100$?
Yep, there's so much blight, and many of these homes have been empty for years, decades, suffering all the environmental and weather damage, vandalism one would expect.
 
For $100, $40, or $1, expect to get a structure and re-do *everything* from plumbing to roof. It's doable, the problem is critical mass - in a neighborhood filled with empty lots, vacant homes, having the only fixed up one is not necessarily a good thing. I saw homes in Detroit stripped of aluminum siding and anything not (or) nailed down. I think Buffalo is better re: crime rate though.
 
 
 
Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
The future has arrived in Detroit

Farms Take Root in Detroit's Foreclosures

by Charla Bear

 
Boarded-up house in Detroit
Charla Bear/NPR

Urban Farming helped turn this empty lot in Detroit into a garden with neat rows of collard greens and tomatoes.

 
 
 
Eric Parrish
Charla Bear, NPR

Eric
Parrish has lived in Detroit for more than 15 years. He says he
recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn
things around in his city.

 
 

Morning Edition, June 11, 2008 · Wayne County, Mich. — home to Detroit — has been hit especially hard by the mortgage crisis.

The
county has inherited thousands of unwanted properties, leaving plot
after plot of vacant land. So a nonprofit group pitched an idea: Take
that unused land, and grow food for the needy.

This year, the
group — called Urban Farming — will take 20 derelict properties in
Wayne County, then pull weeds, lay fresh topsoil, and plant fruits and
vegetables.

The gardens aren't fenced off, so anyone can wander
through and take their pick — for free. Any leftover produce is donated
to food banks.

'A Huge Boon'

Neighborhoods
in Wayne County are littered with boarded-up homes and vacant land
that's covered in knee-high grass. Demolished apartment complexes have
left empty lots the size of football fields.

That's why Urban
Farming founder Taja Seville says Detroit was the perfect place to
start working on farming projects. The city has long suffered from a
glut of available property, and last year it topped the nation in
foreclosures. Wayne County now has about 7,000 idle plots. Seville saw
that as an opportunity.

"I've lived in L.A., N.Y., Connecticut,
London, Minneapolis, and been around a lot, seen a lot of cities. But
I've never seen these long stretches of unused land," says Seville.

Under the 20-plot pilot program, volunteers will tend the garden, and the city of Detroit will pitch in water.

Wayne County Treasurer Raymond Wojtowicz says that's a huge boon.

"It
won't cost the county anything. We're donating the land. If a person
wants to purchase the lot, it will be for sale. Perhaps it will be an
inducement," says Wojtowicz.

'I Want to Garden There'

Wojtowicz
says the biggest benefit, though, is less blight in the neighborhood.
And residents say that, unlike abandoned houses, the gardens aren't
targeted by vandals.

Detroit resident Eric Parrish says that
those who live around the gardens respect the farming projects. "They
see we're doing something to help the community," he says.

Parrish says he recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn things around in his city.

"You can tell people are struggling. So when I do see these plots of land it makes me say, 'I want to garden there,' " he says.

Parrish says most people are grateful for the gardens, although at first a few were concerned they would attract pests.

Turns out that urban farms do
attract people, says Gail Carr, one of Detroit's city managers. She has
houses boarded up nearly every day and sees what a dramatic difference
the gardens have on communities.

"People are coming out of
their homes who wouldn't come out under other circumstances because
they didn't think there was still a community or a neighbor or a
friendly person nearby," she says.

Wojtowicz says the county is watching the program and hopes to expand it.

Seville isn't waiting to expand. She plans to plant hundreds of gardens in at least a dozen other struggling cities this season.

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
The future has arrived in Detroit

Farms Take Root in Detroit's Foreclosures

by Charla Bear

 
Boarded-up house in Detroit
Charla Bear/NPR

Urban Farming helped turn this empty lot in Detroit into a garden with neat rows of collard greens and tomatoes.

 
 
 
Eric Parrish
Charla Bear, NPR

Eric
Parrish has lived in Detroit for more than 15 years. He says he
recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn
things around in his city.

 
 

Morning Edition, June 11, 2008 · Wayne County, Mich. — home to Detroit — has been hit especially hard by the mortgage crisis.

The
county has inherited thousands of unwanted properties, leaving plot
after plot of vacant land. So a nonprofit group pitched an idea: Take
that unused land, and grow food for the needy.

This year, the
group — called Urban Farming — will take 20 derelict properties in
Wayne County, then pull weeds, lay fresh topsoil, and plant fruits and
vegetables.

The gardens aren't fenced off, so anyone can wander
through and take their pick — for free. Any leftover produce is donated
to food banks.

'A Huge Boon'

Neighborhoods
in Wayne County are littered with boarded-up homes and vacant land
that's covered in knee-high grass. Demolished apartment complexes have
left empty lots the size of football fields.

That's why Urban
Farming founder Taja Seville says Detroit was the perfect place to
start working on farming projects. The city has long suffered from a
glut of available property, and last year it topped the nation in
foreclosures. Wayne County now has about 7,000 idle plots. Seville saw
that as an opportunity.

"I've lived in L.A., N.Y., Connecticut,
London, Minneapolis, and been around a lot, seen a lot of cities. But
I've never seen these long stretches of unused land," says Seville.

Under the 20-plot pilot program, volunteers will tend the garden, and the city of Detroit will pitch in water.

Wayne County Treasurer Raymond Wojtowicz says that's a huge boon.

"It
won't cost the county anything. We're donating the land. If a person
wants to purchase the lot, it will be for sale. Perhaps it will be an
inducement," says Wojtowicz.

'I Want to Garden There'

Wojtowicz
says the biggest benefit, though, is less blight in the neighborhood.
And residents say that, unlike abandoned houses, the gardens aren't
targeted by vandals.

Detroit resident Eric Parrish says that
those who live around the gardens respect the farming projects. "They
see we're doing something to help the community," he says.

Parrish says he recently started gardening with Urban Farming because it helps turn things around in his city.

"You can tell people are struggling. So when I do see these plots of land it makes me say, 'I want to garden there,' " he says.

Parrish says most people are grateful for the gardens, although at first a few were concerned they would attract pests.

Turns out that urban farms do
attract people, says Gail Carr, one of Detroit's city managers. She has
houses boarded up nearly every day and sees what a dramatic difference
the gardens have on communities.

"People are coming out of
their homes who wouldn't come out under other circumstances because
they didn't think there was still a community or a neighbor or a
friendly person nearby," she says.

Wojtowicz says the county is watching the program and hopes to expand it.

Seville isn't waiting to expand. She plans to plant hundreds of gardens in at least a dozen other struggling cities this season.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments