Best areas in NC to set root? And other NC questions

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Best areas in NC to set root? And other NC questions

 I have some family that has been migrating to North Carolina, and I'm wondering if any of you know whether NC is a decent spot to set up shop. Although I believe it has a pretty long growing season, I think there are some downfalls:

1. Prone to hurricanes?
2. Water can become short?
3. Growing population?
4. Not as much hunting/wildlife as northern forests?

I'm not sure on any of these points, they are my completely uneducated and possibly unfounded impressions. So if you can give me your thoughts on these issues, and recommend any particular counties/towns in NC I'd be much obliged!

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NC

answers imho

  1. Only if you're near the coast, more inland the 'canes relieve the summer drought

  2. The eastern sandy loams don't hold water as well as the peidmont clay,but they get more 'canes

  3. Its growing,in largepart,  due to the influx of folks who don't like the northern hunting and the restrictions that accompany high density              pops. and short seasons.

  robie, i like Carolina cuz it gets Yankees to keep going and not stop in va. :-)  welcome to CM

       

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NC
  1. Like Robbie says, really only near the coast.  I guess Hurricane Hugo did some damage inland in 1989 but probably not as bad as a midwestern tornado, albeit in a much wider area.
  2. It depends.  A few years ago there were water restrictions but there are many man made lakes to draw water from.  Seems to have gotten plenty of rain this year.
  3. Definately growing but that can be avoided by choosing a more rural area.  Lots of Northern transplants (including me) in the cities that are sick of cold weather and are looking for a slower pace of life.
  4. Probably true but I really don't know.  You can always move to Manitoba if that is your top priority. 

If these are your top priorities, I would look into western NC, somewhere in the Murphy/Hendersonville/Boone triangle, with Asheville being the most important city to investigate.  I think we have some users in that area.  Maybe they can comment futher.

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 If you come through

 If you come through Asheville I'll be happy to be your guide. PM me for contact info.

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Relocating to NC

We recently bought a small farm in Western NC between Murphy and Hayesville.  It's like stepping back into the 1960's.  It's only a 2 hour drive from our current residence in Atlanta.

We love it, however, we are not trying to make a go it economically.  it serves more as a retreat and long term legacy location.  We have plenty of water and the electricity is from TVA (hydro), a little nuclear and several solar farms that have popped up recently.

There are wonderful pockets throughout the western part of the state that would be excellent for putting down roots.  It just kind of depends on how you want to derive your income, if needed.

 

Thanks,

Lindell

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 If you don't mind me

 If you don't mind me asking, how many acres was your farm and how much did it cost? I'm trying to get an idea how much it would cost to relocate.

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Ashe County

If I was going to move to NC I would move to Ashe County.  I have spent a lot of time there over the last 15 years and it is really a great place.  Better take some money with you - there is not much to do there.  The biggest industry is Christmas Tree growing.

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 I see there's a transition

 I see there's a transition town near Chapel Hill. Is that too close to Raleigh for consideration?

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fiorgodx wrote:  I see
fiorgodx wrote:

 I see there's a transition town near Chapel Hill. Is that too close to Raleigh for consideration?

I lived in Richmond VA for a few years.  It is incredibly hot there.  I used to have to go out and start my car at 7:00 in the morning and run the AC to cool it off before I left for work or I would sweat through my shirt before I could get to work.  If you like hot weather then NC on the east side of the mountains will make you happy.  If you do not like hot weather then you should head for the NC mountains.

 

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 Hmmm well I do like warmer

 Hmmm well I do like warmer weather for longer crop season and avoiding too much snow hassle, but the mountains do probably have the benefit of more wildlife, more water (?), and sparser population...North Carolinians, what are your opinions on this??

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I just moved from SJ CA to a

I just moved from SJ CA to a rural area just west of Chapel Hill. I like it so far. There is a serious effort here to support local farms and the cost of living is far lower than where I was. There are three farmers markets per week in town, and some great restaurants supplied by local growers.

I am so new here that I can't compare it to anywhere else in NC. I'm waiting for the leaves to fall so I can actually have a look around!

If you have $$ and are retiring, there are some very nice homes not far from working farms. If you are working there are modest homes and it's not a long communte to Raleigh or Durham. I love mixed-use, mixed-value properties!

I haven't decided that this is my permanent home. I have moved enough times to realize the absurdity of that. But if the SHTF right now I think we'd fare better than most places. In the mean time I'll be doing some aquaponics - seems like a great place for it.

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Welcome

Welcome to the forums Dinglenuts.  You’ll find many interesting people and thoughts here.

Travlin 

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welcome

to the forum Dinglenute(it tickles just to say it) alot of the mid-atlantic is as you describe.  I'm at peace here in south-central VA.

 

robie,husband,father,farmer,optometrist

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DIAP, goes, cover your eyes, the following is a rant on ENC
fiorgodx wrote:

 Hmmm well I do like warmer weather for longer crop season and avoiding too much snow hassle, but the mountains do probably have the benefit of more wildlife, more water (?), and sparser population...North Carolinians, what are your opinions on this??

The Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill the "triangle area" as it is known, is, or rather has become rather "yuppie". And, a stark contrast of "haves and have-nots". (Think - McMansions abound) It is in the middle of the state. goes211 is in Charlotte from what I understand. I am in OZ - I mean Eastern NC. I think the triangle area is much more progressive because of UNC, Duke, NC State etc. I moved here because of all of the progressive published work on alternative energy. I haven't seen it out here. So the following is my impression of eastern NC, sorry I can't help with the western area.

The weather is wicked hot!!! in eastern NC (2 years) down from New England. I am in the "coastal plains" as it is called and the air gets so still in the summer you could cut it with a knife. The humidity here is crushing in the summer, lets up in the winter, BUT it is ALWAYS humid here. Now, as for the haves and have-nots out here, the contrast is even greater. I am talking abject poverty right aside of planned community, Stepford wives, manicured lawns in a golf course setting.

As for the longer growing season, -eh, I will let you know. I am going to build several raised beds this weekend (temps finally cooled off enough to work outside in the humidity). You would think that since it is humid there would be less need for watering but there is no cool down at night for there to be a significant dew settling. This summer has been so hot that it has required twice a day watering of the garden to keep the plants from withering. Last summer I tried watering like I did back home and the plants became so stressed that the yield was poor and the bugs/disease loved munching on the stressed plants. Oh, this summer, I had horned-tomato worms (tobacco worms) on my pepper plants so big I thought about saddling one and riding it to work!

Eastern NC is also all about the military. I am being "enlightened" about the term "military-industrial-complex". Oh boy - was I naive. If it wasn't for the military in eastern NC, the entire economy out here would collapse.

Lastly, the "natives" here are still fighting the "war of northern aggression". Yeah, really, that's what they call it - even in the public schools. Even in the progressive private school that my kids attend, there are discussions of whether-or-not Lincoln was a traitor, the war was only about greedy northern cotton mills trying to force the "south" to sell its cotton only to them and not to England... the diatribe goes on and on. And, if you can speak in complete sentences, don't sound like you have a mouthful of marbles when you speak, you are called a "Yankee". Personally, I don't like the Yankees either I am a Red Sox fan! :-P

As for the farms, I think they have been so mono-cropped (cotton and tobacco) that if you were to buy a farm you would have a long way to go to restore it. I have only seen one small area in the county where I live that the soil does not look just dead.

Maybe western NC is better. Maybe the soil is better, some break from the oppressive heat in the summer due to the altitude, I just don't know. What I would be willing to bet is the "native" culture would be the same.

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welcome to the forums, dinglenuts

Yeah, you're right,  the mixed-use properties in the Carolinas are the best. People are actually allowed to make a living on their property! 

I moved to the Columbia SC area from Long Island NY and it was quite a shock ( a pleasant one) to see how much cheaper the cost of living is here and more entrepreneur/business-friendly this area is.

Good luck with the aquaponics. There is a great section on that in the "What Should I Do?" (WSID)  section of PeakProsperity.com

Safewrite

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East vs. West Carolinas.

RNcarl has a point, BUT I have experience with the Western part of both states. My brother in law is a professor at Clemson University and we visit a lot. It is cooler in the SC Appalachian mountains. Drier, too. Same goes for the NC Appalachians: last winter my girlfriend had to put off a vacation in the NC mountains for weeks due to snow and ice.

As to monocropping, it depends. The farmers near my inlaws, near Sumter SC if you want to look for it on a map, at least rotate their crops. They grow hay in the winter, and two crops in the summer: lots of soy (which enriches the soil), a little cotton, some corn if they have enough water, tobacco (not so much as years ago), and vegetables. Two crops a year, plus hay. You also have a number of pecan groves and peach orchards. But the biggest crop is sustainable southern pines, for lumber and paper.

If we ever start growing perrennial switchgrass for biodiesel we just might take over the world.

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I've been reading some good

I've been reading some good things about Asheville, and some bad stuff. It seems like good temperate weather (not as hot as out east), a good city presence but possibly an over reliance on tourism and maybe too many Northern transplants. I'd be a northern transplant so I guess it's hypocrytical for me to judge against that but I'd like a place with good community ties and some sort of industry where people could survive post-collapse.

How does Asheville stack up?

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 Asheville. Great views,

 Asheville.

Great views, great weather. Currently, work is found in govt.,health care and hospitality. Travel out of here for work is challenging. Yankees are tolerated in the rural areas, welcomed in Asheville. It is the bible belt. It is the South. Huge retirement community. Large "alternative lifestyles" presence (hippy, gay, goth....). Great restaurants. Great alternative health practices. Great natural groceries. Farm to table is growing rapidly.

Future.

It is mountainous so in a time of liquid fuel shortage, it will hit here harder. Our Honda gets 30mpg here where flatlanders are getting 37mpg. Public tranportation (busses) is poorly run. Buncombe county is broke and has too many social programs and recipents. NC and Asheville are broke too. Buncombe county and Asheville work with Agenda 21 counselors. Battle coming there. IMO, both the county and the city governments will tax citizens out of town rather than shrink. Battle coming there. The region is historically one of the poorest in the nation and to get to the nice neighborhoods in the country you'll drive past trailers and poverty. Plenty of pesticides have been used in apple and tobacco fields. The water system in Asheville is old and the blueprints were lost. Oops. There is plenty of water here. Many homes use oil for heat and natural gas is not in all neighborhoods. 

As with all places, it's a mixed bag. Too much for me to write. If you come up with specific questions PM me.

With regards to the OP:

1)Hurricanes can bring flooding around rivers and streams.

2)Lots of water in springs and creeks. Use caution when purchasing as some are dry in drought.

3)Population growth is not strong, young, productive Americans. There is little draw for them here.

4)Small game - squills, skunk, coon, opossum are plentiful. Deer are few and small, nothing larger. Not a huge game bird population.

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 Thanks for the lengthy

 Thanks for the lengthy reply. From your assessment, it seems like Asheville is a pretty nice place now but post collapse would be difficult for those many factors you listed, is that correct?

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I lived in N.C. for four

I lived in N.C. for four years and am personally considering returning to it to make of a go of it during the transition period.  It seems like Western NC is a good blend of wild areas and mild weather.  Asheville is a great little town, and maybe the outskirts of Asheville would be a good location.  I know very little regarding the arability of the land, but it is a fairly moist environment so I would think it would be pretty good.  I'd probably suggest staying away from some of the more developed regions in Central and the coast in Eastern NC...

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have lived in NC since 1987

My husband and I have lived in the Raleigh-Durham area since 1987, when he started his graduate studies at UNC. At various times, between the two of us, we have been involved professionally in the commercial real estate, K-12 education, information technology, state government, university and nonprofit sectors. A couple of my former positions took me to all parts of the state working with renewable energy and sustainability issues. Although I may be echoing some of the previous posts, here's my take:

Politics/Religion/Culture
Disclaimer: I'm a life-long registered Independent, and at this point feel that the entire political process is broken and clueless in the face of the deep systemic challenges we are facing. However, the Republicans currently make my blood boil more than the Democrats, so apologies up front for letting my personal views show through as I describe the political/cultural landscape.

While solidly Bible Belt, North Carolina is one of the most progressive states in the southeast on many issues and is far more complex than the usual stereotypes of the South portray it. I'm originally from Atlanta, GA and have relatives in Columbia, SC - my take is that both of those states are far more conservative than NC. That said, the Republicans gained control of the NC state legislature this year and have been hell-bent on enacting as much of their agenda as quickly as possible...everything from a state constitutional ban on same-sex marriage to cutting education and health services to gutting environmental protections. Even the business community is opposing some of their proposals as being too extreme and damaging to recruiting the types of companies and creative professionals they want to attract to the state. The swiftness with which these changes are being made has surprised many people and is a red flag that you can never count on public policies remaining consistent anywhere, especially as people react in all sorts of irrational ways to the unprecedented sea change on the way.

Despite the perception that we're all Southern Baptists (nothing against Baptists...I was raised in that church), there is a diverse religious community in North Carolina including Catholics, Jews, Unitarians, Muslims, Buddhists, and even humanists and atheists. We're quite proud of the NC Council of Churches, which is comprised of churches from all faiths to address issues of common concern. (FYI, many, many churches across the state have some out strongly and publicly against the proposed gay marriage constitional amendment.)

The Chapel Hill/Carrboro area on the western side of the "Triangle" (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill) in the piedmont region is considered the most liberal area. (I heard it said that Jesse Helms, infamous former "Sentator NO" from NC, used to want to put a fence around Orange County and expel it from the state.) Just south of there is Chatham County, with a vibrant community-based focus on sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, and small entrepreneurial endeavors. Actually, you will find people working toward these goals in every part of the state. I personally know of active, creative sustainability efforts in Wilmington, Greenville, Durham, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, Boone, Asheville, Charlotte and even Fayetteville (home to Ft. Bragg). Surprisingly, Ft Bragg has been a leader in adopting sustainability for the past 10 years. Yes, that seems like an oxymoron and I was skeptical at first, but they have taken serious steps in renewable energy, energy conservation, waste reduction, wildlife/ecosystem preservation and supporting local business.

As others have said here, Asheville is a pleasant town in the mountains with an active arts, music & sustainability culture. The area tends to be a mix of younger progressives and older Bible Belt conservatives. Boone is another interesting mountain town. It is home to Appalachian State University, which has an appropriate technology degree program. There is a heavy reliance on tourism throughout the western part of the state, and much of the land has been carved up into 10-acre parcels with vacation homes. The lament there is that you can't get anywhere in the summer because the roads are packed with cars with Florida plates (likely to change when it's no longer cheap & easy to travel). On the other hand, there is a rich tradition of mountain crafts and herb lore that has not been entirely forgotten. There are schools teaching skills such as blacksmithing, basket weaving, wood carving, furniture making, pottery and more. And if you really want to get off the beaten path, there are still some extremely remote pockets in the western tip of the state...likely with an interesting and eclectic group of residents!

My feeling is that the majority of people in every part of the country are oblivious to the broader trends, and at the same time, there are individuals & small groups with a different worldview who are trying to forge new lives in widely scattered places. The larger culture within which we are all embedded to some degree is falling apart and that process will be messy whatever regional culture we happen to live in. I grew up on one of the last small farms just outside of Atlanta with grandparents who survived the Depression farming there, and appreciate the positive traits of this culture at the same time that I acknowledge and am saddened by the aspects that have led to narrow-minded views and injustices. But is there any place on earth that does not have roots in exploitation and injustice to some degree? I prefer the devil that I know.

Climate/Agriculture
OK, this is the South, folks! Anyone from most any other part of the country is going to think that it's hot and humid, because...well, it is. Naturally, it's cooler and dryer overall in the western mountains, and the sea breezes on the beaches make those areas more pleasant. Here in the piedmont, winters are relatively mild with occasional light snows (except for the freak 20" storm we had back around 2000), spring and fall are absolutely gorgeous, but the summers are increasingly miserably hot. This past summer, we had several multiple-day stretches with temps over 100 degrees, and yes, the humidity DOES make it feel worse. It's not quite as bad as central Florida, where I lived for a few years, but I feel certain that our summers are trending warmer. All but one of my prized rhododendrons, which were marginal here anyway, have died within the past couple of years. At the same time, my warm weather plants, such as the gardenias, are suddenly getting huge.

We do have hurricanes in North Carolina, and not just on the coast. Pull up a map of the east coast and then look at how often hurricanes turn northward from the Carribeans. If the steering currents don't take them out into the Atlantic (or up the east coast like Irene), they come straight through the middle of the state...e.g., Hazel in the 1950's, Hugo in 1989 and Fran in 1996. Here in Raleigh, we had hurricane force winds from Fran. Hundreds of homes had serious damage from falling trees and power was out over large areas for a couple of weeks.

Also, North Carolina is near the top of the list for tornadoes and deaths from lightening. I think that the incidence of tornadoes less in the mountains, but I'm not sure. I can say without hesitation that we definiely have droughts throughout the state, and those seem to be coming more frequently. We were in a severe drought  a few years ago, and the water tables are getting low again now.

That said, the climate is still relatively mild compared to many other areas of the country and generally good for agriculture.  The soils in the middle of the state are predominantly clays and clay loams, and as would be expected, become more sandy the closer you get to the coast. The broad coastal plain has good soils and a rich agricultural heritage. However, as tobacco waned as a cash crop, many farmers turned to hogs and that industry exploded here in the 1990's with the result that there are currently more hogs than people living in NC, most of them concentrated east of I-95. This has resulted in a huge environmental issue as the waste is flushed into large open "lagoons" and then sprayed onto fields. Each hog produces four times the volume of waste as a human, so imagine the equivalent of sewage from 40 million people sitting out in open ponds! When Hurricane Floyd came through in 1999, the ponds overflowed into the floodwaters and rivers. Depite 10+ years of lawsuits and research into alternatives, it's still an unresolved issue, but one that has largely disappeared from public discourse.

Farming in the western part of the state focuses more on crops such as apples and christmas trees. A wide variety of fruits and vegetables are also grown, and a good bit of the land is in small pastures. I think that there is ample opportunity for small, diverse, sustainably-managed farms in the region. As in any mountainous area, though, there are dangers from flash floods and landslides...just carefully analyze the geology and hydrology of any land you're considering purchasing.

This post is probably already too long, so I'll wrap up here. I hope that it is helpful in some small way to anyone considering moving to North Carolina. While we may move farther west, we plan to stay in state at this point. If anyone has other specific questions, please feel free to contact me privately.

 

 

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NC humidity overblown?

 

Katyan,

Thanks for that very informative post.

One comment I have is in regards to the humidity. I have been to NC one time (Raleigh/Durham) back in July '04 when my wife and I adopted our son. Being from California, we were warned repeatedly about the oppressive heat/humidity. Although it rained several times while we were there with temps in the high 90's, it didn't seem much different from summers here in Southern California.

North Carolina is a beautiful place, so much so that when the financial/banking crisis hit in '08 we seriously considered bugging out to the Ashville area. Loved it there.

Anyways, there's my ramblings for the day.

 

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NC humidity

The humidity level here can vary widely, and there are clearly other places that experience similar conditions. We've all heard so many bitter complaints from visitors and newcomers that we just assume it must be worse here. I once set up some meetings here for a guy from Colorado and he acted as if he was about to die. The other person in our little entourage was from SC and we were both talking about how pleasant the weather was that day! I did find some of the 100+ degree high-humidity days this summer really oppressive, but for the most part, you get used to it and stay indoors during the hottest part of the day.

Yes, we also love Asheville and the entire Smoky Mountain/Blue Ridge area.  I have an acquaintance whose family owns 1400 acres right off the Blue Ridge Parkway that they have turned into a retreat for nonprofit & community groups. Did you know that movie The Last of the Mohicans was filmed in NC? I didn't even realize any scenery that gorgeous was here until I saw it.

If you decide to come this way, I'll be happy to make introductions or provide additional info.

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Katyan thank you so much for

Katyan thank you so much for this detailed post. I had already researched much of this before I moved to the Carrboro area, but it's nice to confirm that I picked a reasonable spot within NC. Although I'm a libertarian myself, I do not find the liberal climate in town to be offensive at all. On the contrary everyone is wonderful and I really enjoy the educted people, good restaurants, and quality supermarkets that you don't find in right-wingy places. Coming from the SF bay area, I feel it has all of the little amenities I liked there and none of the things that I was fleeing from. This would make it harder for me to move further out to the country but I am looking forward to getting out and seeing more of the state. 

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 Thanks so much Katyan for

 Thanks so much Katyan for such a lengthy post! More than I could have hoped for. I'm going to visit these areas this fall, but right now I'm leaning towards either Asheville (rural area within half an hour) or New Hampshire. They are very different but here is my reasoning

Asheville Pros:

Good mild climate (less energy for heating)
Longer growing season
Asheville is widely regarded as a beautiful, fun, pleasant place
I have family living around Raleigh and friends interested in moving to Asheville
Decent gun laws

Asheville Cons:

Apparently city, county, and state are bankrupt
Unfavorable political climate
Potential drought and water issues
"Anti northern invader" sentiments by many natives
Southern bias against certain races, religions, sexual preferences, etc (not all southerners but many I hear)
Mountains could make travel difficult post-oil

New Hampshire Pros:

No state income or sales tax
Independent disposition (state motto: Live Free or Die, secessionist sentiments)
Liberty loving (freestateproject.org, other libertarian groups)
Good sustainability communities (including transition towns)
Small & weak government, little beauracracy
Extremely business friendly
Seemingly friendly and tolerant populace
Ample water
Safest state in the country (need source)
Good gun laws

New Hampshire Cons:

COLD! may be offset by ample timber for heating
Shorter growing season
High property tax
 

If you all have any thoughts on my pros or cons, whether you think any of them are unfounded or if you want to add your own please do!

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regarding NH

My parents retired to New Hampshire. You got one wrong about NH - long-time residents are not well-disposed toward newcomers. They actually have bumper stickers that say, "Welcome to NH. Now go home!" The're half-serious. And you are literally considered "new" for about 100 years.

That being said, it's no worse than the prejudice against "Yankees" in the south (I am one, I should know *grin*.) And my folks found a community to be a part of. In their case it was a church community; in your case it would be a transition town.

The southern NH Atlantic coast is very expensive - it's a series of resort towns and to be avoided for a prepper. And the bottom third of the state is comparatively densely populated: they're all refugees from high-tax  Massachussets (or, as New Hampshirites call their neighbor to the south, Tax-a-chussetts). Again, this part of the state is also more expensive.  Plus, if there is a sudden crash there will be an influx of city folk from northern MA to southern NH.  

One more thing to consider about NH. It is not racially diverse. I'm not saying they are prejudiced  (except against all newcomers), but a person of color or Asian of any stripe would stand out like a sore thumb anywhere but in a Univeristy town, like Dartmouth.

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perceptions of the south

You seem to have a well thought out list of pros and cons. My feeling is that some of your perceptions about the south are inaccurate, though. Yes, "natives" living in areas with heavy tourism get tired of the traffic, long lines at restaurants, and the inevitable weird behavior of some visitors...just like the residents of NH. But in general, people here are open and welcoming to newcomers. Sure, we make a few jokes at their expense, such as the adage that Cary (a town that has long been a bedroom community for the Research Triangle Park's many high tech companies) stands for "Containment Area for Relocated Yankees", but it's mostly good-natured ribbing. The influx of newcomers actually goes back decades, so we're pretty much used to it.

That said, we ARE a bit tired of the subtle and not-so-subtle putdowns of our food, accents, intelligence and supposed prejudices. I can recall that my mother's boss and his wife, New York transplants in the 60's, were so shocked that Atlanta had a symphony orchestra and that we weren't all running around barefoot using outhouses. The history of Atlanta during that period is quite interesting. The city's leadership was enlightened in its handling of the Civil Rights movement, largely avoiding the violence that marred other parts of the country (the north included). Not that it was all sunshine and roses, but given the climate of the times, a remarkable accomplishment.

I've spend a good bit of time in the Asheville area working with civic leaders and nonprofits there, and have found many progressive people with innovative ideas and a commitment to building a more sustainable community. There is a wide range of groups working on renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, alternative transportation, transition towns, etc. Of course, there are differing philosophical and political ideas...it wouldn't be the real world otherwise...but there also seems to be a dynamic civic discourse.

You can find prejudiced, narrow-minded, and unfriendly people anywhere in the world. The majority of states, counties and cities are facing serious ongoing financial crises. Reactionary, clueless politics seems to be the norm across the country these days. In truly difficult times, no one can predict exactly how people and governments are going to react, although we can speculate about various scenarios. My fear is authoritarian federal and state actions in response to the perceived "temporary" emergency. My personal preference is for relatively strong local governments and civic groups with the competence, openess and flexibility to work with its citizens to co-create appropriate solutions for the well-being of the entire community. (IMHO, every man/woman for him/herself with an arsenal of guns on 20 acres in the woods sounds like a recipe for violence and chaos.)

In summary, there is no perfect place. The "natives" in any area are likely to be hostile to newcomers who come barging in with their own prejudices, criticizing and telling them how "things were done back home", and expecting to take without giving back. Those who come with a respectful attitude, taking the time to get to know and appreciate their new neighbors, and making it clear that they want to contribute to the community, will most likely receive a warm welcome even if their views on some things are different.

However you imagine me, that is how I will appear to you.
~ The Bagadavida

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earthwise
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Joined: Aug 10 2009
Posts: 846
Katyan wrote re: perceptions of the South
katyan wrote:

 

 But in general, people here are open and welcoming to newcomers.

I'm not very well traveled, only been to the Southwest and Mexico so take this FWIW. One of the most enduring memories our our trip to North Carolina was the hospitality and politeness of the people we met. Maybe we just got lucky repeatedly, but my wife was so comforted by the exhibition of manners, southern charm and etiquette; quite different from having grown up in the Los Angeles area.

Doug's picture
Doug
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Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3125
Last of the Mohicans
Quote:

Did you know that movie The Last of the Mohicans was filmed in NC? I didn't even realize any scenery that gorgeous was here until I saw it.

I didn't know it at the time I saw the movie, but knew something was wrong.  In just about every scene they were running through forests of rhododendrons.  I'm pretty familiar with the "Leather Stocking" region of NY and knew there aren't that many rhodendrons there.  But, I will say the scenery in the movie is about as nice as most areas of upstate NY.

Doug

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Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3125
southern hospitality
earthwise wrote:
katyan wrote:

 

 But in general, people here are open and welcoming to newcomers.

I'm not very well traveled, only been to the Southwest and Mexico so take this FWIW. One of the most enduring memories our our trip to North Carolina was the hospitality and politeness of the people we met. Maybe we just got lucky repeatedly, but my wife was so comforted by the exhibition of manners, southern charm and etiquette; quite different from having grown up in the Los Angeles area.

For a number of years I was married into a southern family.  The rumors of southern hospitality are definitely true.  A kinder more generous and genteel group would be hard to find......as long as you avoid certain subjects.  If you don't, you can have a fight on your hands.

Doug

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joemanc
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 16 2008
Posts: 834
Doug wrote:  The rumors of
Doug wrote:

 The rumors of southern hospitality are definitely true.  A kinder more generous and genteel group would be hard to findDoug

+1.  Whenever I have been to the South, not Florida, I always have to put my "nice person hat" on. Being from the Northeast, there is very little of that Southern niceness. Everyone is in a rush up here!

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