Be Responsible! ;-)

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SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
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Be Responsible! ;-)

investorzzo's picture
investorzzo
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

David A. Roberts, Culpeper
Published: February 22, 2009

Throughout
this whole foreclosure fiasco, it appears there has been complete blame
put on the purchasers who bought homes they knew they could not afford
and the bankers who granted the loans.

But throughout the process, there are others who share
responsibility, and yet no mention seems to be made of those people. I
have to wonder why.

I see this as no different than many people who go to a car
dealership to purchase a used auto, and through the slick talk of the
salesperson and their power of persuasion the prospective buyer — who
knows full well what he can reasonably afford to buy — is talked into a
vehicle that is out of his financial reach.

By putting the buyer in a car that is financed for six years —
making the monthly payment close to what they would have paid for the
used car financed for three years — the dealership makes more money,
the salesman makes more money and the buyer pays the price.

In the case of real estate, I suspect there are many good people who
approached real estate agents to inquire about purchasing a home that
was within their financial means.

But the agents, knowing that they could get them in a more expensive
home and thus make a larger commission, persuaded them that the bigger
and better home is what they would be most happy with.

In turn, there was also the attorney who was involved and who was
supposed to represent the buyer. When the papers came across his desk,
did he not see that his client was not going to be able to afford this
home? Did he then discuss this with them and try to put a stop to it?

You can bet that didn’t happen very often, if at all.

The fact of the matter is that real estate agents refer people to
certain lawyers for settlements, and you can bet your bottom dollar
that had the lawyer put the brakes on the deal he would never again be
referred by the agent.

This may be a fact, but it still does not alleviate the lawyer from his responsibility in representing the client he serves.

And I have to think that perhaps the reason the lawyer in this
scenario has not even been discussed by Congress is because many of the
congressmen in Washington who are pointing the finger are themselves
lawyers. So if they point the finger, they have three fingers pointing
at themselves. And lawyers tend to look out for each other. It’s just
another good-old-boys club.

And as for real estate agents, well, there’s another whole bucket of worms.

 

I didn't post this to be cute. I posted it to let everyone know that anyone can find themselfs in a fix in life. It is always easier to find blame in the party you know nothing about. Where was that persons head at the time. I doubt most thought what has happened would happen. I remember my broker saying, "you sure ask more questions than most of them". I now realize I didn't ask some all right ones. The ones I didn't know. And the other parties involved aren't really interested in your welfare, just making the sale. Life is full of lessons. I really believed I would or could make it when I bought.

What really is funny is how those who know how the system is run, will still come back and blame the buyer! When the whole system is one big Ponzi scheme. So many are angry at the home owners, but I ask you where were the Bankers, lawyers, real estate agents, brokers, appraisers in all this? I have learned one big lesson; man has little tolerance for error's not of his own making. I know for myself, I thought if I didn't buy now, the cost was going to go out of site for good. Little did I know just how much I didn't know. Financal planning should be manditory in every class room.

caroline_culbert's picture
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

Tragedy of the Commons foreseeable.

strabes's picture
strabes
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

investorzzo, I agree with that.  I have zip respect for realtors, lawyers, bankers, etc. SOME of whom are non-thinking leeches that go along with economic cycles and charge a toll for their non-value-add services.  However, this problem is not their fault either.  This entire problem is a result of living in a debt-based monetary system run by the Federal Reserve, which in turn is run by the richest people in the world who use this sytem to enslave all of us.  Until that system ends, inflation/deflation cycles like this will never stop.

End the Fed!

 

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caroline_culbert
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)
strabes wrote:

investorzzo, I agree with that.  I have zip respect for realtors, lawyers, bankers, etc. SOME of whom are non-thinking leeches that go along with economic cycles and charge a toll for their non-value-add services.  However, this problem is not their fault either.  This entire problem is a result of living in a debt-based monetary system run by the Federal Reserve, which in turn is run by the richest people in the world who use this sytem to enslave all of us.  Until that system ends, inflation/deflation cycles like this will never stop.

End the Fed!

 

YES YOU ARE SO RIGHT!

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

I am proof positive that car dealers will try and get you in the car you can least afford. In mid-December, my '05 Jeep Liberty that I bought with 26,000 miles on it in '06 was totaled. Now I had full insurance, and after the original 36,000 mile warranty expired, went online and bought extended warranty coverage. It wasn't until the wreck that I found out that I didn't have gap insurance, something that in hindsight being 20/20 it was something I should have insisted on, but the dealer didn't offer it, I wasn't aware of it, so there I was. The insurance paid roughly $10,000 and I still owed $4,000 on it. When I had traded in my used car, there was still $2,000 left owed on it that was rolled over into the Jeep Payments. My interest rate was 18.99 but after a year and a half was able to refiniance down to 12.99. I had been trying to make arrangements to lower the payments on the now totaled jeep, so I could afford to make payments on another car so I could drive, and this is what hapened:

 I went to the same dealership that I had got the Jeep in '06 and the Chevy Cobalt I co-signed for my daughter in '08. I was offered gap and extended warranty on that car, and of course bought it. The interest was an ungodly 23.99 percent, and I was told it will probably take another year before I can get that lowered the last time I checked.

 When I went to the dealership, I said that I wanted a small colorado pickup truck (as that one would be going to my son when he graduates. They said the only way they could help me would be to get me into an equinox, since there were rebates, and they would also be able to roll the four grand I still owed on the Jeep into it. HOWEVER...I could not get gap insurance on this one there either. I had the salesman hard selling me, trying to tell me that it would be no problem at all to get gap coverage through a car insurance salesmen...the guy even made a point of calling a friend of his that was an insurance salesman who reassured him (and he reassured me, natuch) taht getting gab would be no problem at all.  The payments would be $661 a month (far higher than my previous jeep payments of $387 a month), I would need to put down a grand within two weeks, and the interst was 24.99.

 ack!

 I went outside to smoke a cig and the salesguy joined me and I said that as much as I hated not being able to drive a car home, I just couldn't do it.It was just one thing on top of another..the car wasn't the original one I wanted, the interest rates were stky high, and there was no gap coverage. So I left it and went home.

Two days later went to a used car dealership. Was still looking for a truck for my son, but then decided to try a few cars, and really liked the way an 03 mitsubishi galant handled. Looked up on the net, and the main problems with them are the automatic windows will go out and need replacing, which of course this one did. No biggie, I pay 200 bucks, they put it in for free. The interest is 16.99, payments are $361 for two years and it's owned. If any major engine problems come up, I get to bring it in, they will count my payments towards another car, and I drive off with that one. Not exactly a warranty, but close enough for me. Sucker has a lot more pickup than I thought it would and gets incredible gas mileage!

Oh but not quote done with the other dealership yet. I waited two days and then on the third day bought the galant at the used car dealership. I am driving on my way home, and they say they now have a colorado I am approved for and it will have gap insurance. I said thanks but no thanks you snooze you looze.

 I know that I will never get the best interest rates or prices because my credit is shot to hell and back (much like me, lol!), but that doesn't mean I have to be a complete doormat about it, you know?  Now I was at one point three years ago offerd a decent deal on a house but wasn't able to get the deal closed....so there was this eager beaver realtor that showed me my dream home, lakefront property, four bedrooms, fireplace, storm cellar nearby...only I couldn't afford it. She said that I could afford it and showed me how and I said sure I can afford it now but if the interest rates go up what then? She said taht it wasn't likely to hppen and if it did we could do some 'creative financing'. Well my kids were pissed we didn't get the house...I didn't even make an offer. I would rather rent forever and pay what I know I can afford then take a chance on losing everything.

 But please don't think that people that took these loans aren't using their noggin, they are just being swept along in the spur of the moment, and a wink and a nod that evrything will be okay. I feel bad for them. They were hornswaggled, plain and swimple.

 

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sunson
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)
investorzzo wrote:

In the case of real estate, I suspect there are many good people who
approached real estate agents to inquire about purchasing a home that
was within their financial means.

But the agents, knowing that they could get them in a more expensive
home and thus make a larger commission, persuaded them that the bigger
and better home is what they would be most happy with.

Read Freakonomics? The author argues, Agents don't really bother to get a slightly higher commission and instead focus on selling more houses. So if you wanted a given house sold at $X, chances are they'll end up trying to close a deal at a lesser price because they get more deals by moving on to the next house. Especially so when real-estate is booming.

So... I don't buy into that argument of yours.

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

i think the truth is both: some are lke the feakonomics author points out but some are not. A  real esate friend of mine says he knows this for a fact.

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

Investor I'm sorry your going through this. Debt is a four letter word. It is a cuss word. The rule of life especially these days is live well below your means and save every dime you can even when times improve. That is the trap we all can have a tendency to fall into is that when times are good we think they are going to continue to be good. That will never be the case.

Your money either works for you(savings) or you work for your money(debt).

You are mad and want to blame someone else but no one else can make you sign a contract borrowing money. It is your decision and while we on this board feel for your situation what keeps going through my mind is you want the gov't to help you but the gov't is us. It basically means they are taking money from us and our own personal financial struggles to help someone who made a bad decision. We all make them and need to solve them ourselves. It empowers us. 

Bottom line it is just money and it is just a house. The sun rises every morning and that is one of the things that keeps occuring to me every morning is I walk outside and it is a beautiful morning. I don't need money to experience a lot of the joys that this world gives freely. Feel free to disregard but this is an opportunity for you to start over get educated and take control of your life because your gov't will not help you. Only you can help you. The freedom that gives you is incredible.

Good Luck. 

 

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Ken C
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

 

 

"The interest was an ungodly 23.99 percent,"

 

I would ride a bicycle or take the bus or WALK before I would ever pay 23.99 percent interest for anything.

 

 

 

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investorzzo
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

Buzztatom, I'm mad, but not at losing my house. I am angry that I learned to late about what was really going on in this country and world. When I bought the house, I had some idea's of the criminal doings of government and the markets. But had no idea of the Fed and the ponzi scheme in play.

 So, yes I'm angry, as now I really know I wouldn't have bought the house and would have made much different decisions about my life and my goals. I am also angry that the people depending on me will suffer for my decisions and the way the system is taking us all into slavery. Economic, civil, spiritual, dead zone slavery. That is why I am spreading the word far and wide. Thats why I'm here and some tell me to get on with life. But what will the future be? If we do not stand up now, then will we be able to when the last pieces of the puzzle are put into place. So my first priority now is to wake up as many as I can. In numbers we have strength.  

 This is why we need to educate our kids and to not white wash the world, saying they are to young to really know the truth. If we ever get our country back, I would say this knowledge should be manditory in every classroom in America! 

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strabes
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)
investorzzo wrote:

 This is why we need to educate our kids and to not white wash the world, saying they are to young to really know the truth. If we ever get our country back, I would say this knowledge should be manditory in every classroom in America!

Yep, but the school system is run by the same elitists who are serving the interests of the rich trillionaires behind the Fed system.  They have a very strong interest in keeping the kids ignorant.

I got out of the corporate world and am now providing psychological counseling on the side for kids in lower income schools.  The crap I see in those schools is unbelievable.  They're all being trained to worship our political leaders, specifically the Dems.  They are obama robots.  The Repubs are no better, so I'm not one of those popular talk show hosts who says the goal should be defeating leftism and replacing it with republican crap...they're 2 sides of the same coin.  Training little kids to cheer for either worthless political party shows how bad this country is going to get.  There is no substantial energy behind breaking free of the left/right political paradigm and seeing what's really happening...how both parties are killing this country, the world, and serving the interests of the banking oligarchy.  Kids aren't being taught reality.  But the adults don't know reality either.  In the end, the whole idea of school being a place run by government-certified professionals to train your kids in "proper" thought is another symptom of the problem...creates serfs and subjects, not free-thinking citizens.

I'm seriously becoming more convinced that leaving this country is the best option, just like our founders left England. Enjoying a place like Costa Rica where community still exists, love still exists, people aren't racing around trying to make a W2 to pay their 1040, sounds like a far far better option to me than fighting an impossible battle against 100 million robots and their elitist oppressors.  Chris' efforts will take us back to that type of society, but as our current empire crashes the robots might blame people like Chris for their problems and...we all know what happens then....

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

Investor I understand. I think the hard lesson we all have to learn painfully is no one can take care of us like ourselves. Govt's while started with good intentions are horribly inefficient and overwhelmingly corrupt for the most part. The education part I think comes from the family and how they live as an example. It would be nice if the school system taught something but then you are dependent on the curriculum, the teacher and whether the student pays attention. That being said most high schools have several electives that can help. I think everyone should have to take an accounting class.Family is where it's at.

My minister once told me if you are looking to another human being for your salvation, knowledge or well being the majority of time they will fail you. That is human nature we are imperfect beings. 

 

 

 

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Re: Octuplets' Mom On Welfare, Spokesman Confirms
SamLinder wrote:

somewhat related....

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,490269,00.html

The Southern California mother of octuplets receives $490 a month in food stamps and three of her first six children are disabled and receiving federal assistance, her publicist confirmed Monday evening.

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

I get so damn mad when people put the majority of the blame on the consumer for policies and practices specifically put in place to entice the consumer to do exactly what blame is being put on them for.

I don't remember voting for government to pass laws to "force" (according to banks of course) financial institutions to open up a sub-prime lending strategy.

I don't remember voting to give financial institutions the right to sell my agreement with them to someone else at a profit and with whom I may not trust.

I don't remember voting to make my mortgage an investment vehicle for the masses......

I personally think it should be illegal for anyone to "sell" someone else's loan without the consent of the person the loan has been taken with.  That's my opinion of course.  And yes, I know it's in the fine print of the mortgage and that I don't have to "enter into the agreement" if I don't want to.  However I challenge you to find a mortgage lender who doesn't give themselves the right to do these things.

Peace!!

 

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strabes
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)
Craig wrote:

I get so damn mad when people put the majority of the blame on the consumer for policies and practices specifically put in place to entice the consumer to do exactly what blame is being put on them for.

I hear ya Craig.  Blaming consumers (many of which are admittedly sheep and/or ignorant, so it's not like I'm totally absolving them) unfortunately reveals that people don't understand the massive nature of the systemic fraud we've lived under for a while.  This was a massive massive fraud led by 1) the Fed and 2) all the massive institutions that feed off the Fed system (Wall St, other central banks, hedge funds, etc...the collective power of these institutions is inconceivable...the idea that individual people can fight it is delusional), not to mention the govt, the media, the regulating bodies, the "expert" economists, the banks, the appraisers, etc etc etc etc etc etc etc.  

Somebody on this thread used a Colin Powell quote to support the notion that we're all supposed to be responsible and not be sucked into a fraud.  Well anybody remember Colin trying to convince the UN that Iraq had WMD?  He was sucked into the systemic fraud where every institution out there thought they had WMD.  It's hard for him to claim people should be above such activity....he was suckered just like the masses.  And a lot of the masses weren't necessarily suckered.  They were just existing...living in a fraudulent system by its very nature means you will eventually be a victim of it if the fraud becomes so massive that it brings down the entire system.  No I guess I'm being irresponsible by saying that individuals should have been able to predict the Great Depression 2.0, which hasn't even really hit yet, so they shouldn't have taken out any loans. Please!  This foreclosure problem goes way beyond the stupid sub-prime types that were using their house as a bank.  This depression is going to eventually suck in almost anybody living in a house with < 33% equity in it.  It's inevitable.  

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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)

Hi Jessme,

'Woodman' put up this thread :-

Anyone Making Changes...

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/anyone-making-changes-their-car/14362

...I wrote my take on it but will add more for you here.

When I was a teenager growing up in the UK, finance was just for the very rich to afford. People made do with what they had and 'scrap yards' were the places you visited to keep your 'old hack' roadworthy. People of all ages kept their cars serviced and in full fettle in the best ways they could, sharing knowledge as to what goes where and how. I learnt how to swap a gearbox over from watching and not reading technical books. Suspension re-fits, brake rebuilds, electical diagnostics, grinding and welding, re-paints, cleaning and polishing - kept old cars travelling long trips for those once a year holidays to the coast, after a year-long wait in preparation and being land-locked.

At 16 I was teaching friends how to service an engine. Points, condensor, distributor cap, rotor arm, high tension leads, spark plugs, air-filter, oil and filter - gaps cleaned and gauged, electrical contacts emery sanded and lightly greased with vasaline - brake linings adjusted for pedal travel; all of this completed in an hour and a half and guaranteeing your chariot remained reliable for the journey ahead and that you'd past this knowledge onto keen on-lookers, who in future would do the same for another crowd.

Making the engine in a Mini reliable isn't rocket science. The engine was developed by Alex Issigonis and became the main variant in many British cars. This was the A series engine and grew from 1948 as an 803cc engine, right upto 2001 as a 1275cc engine; all much the same, with added pipework and electronic ignition and injection instead of carburettor to mix the air and petrol.

These abilities were common knowledge and expected of you as wrote. Books for every marque of automobile were thumbed regularly with oily fingers with the best of them made by Haynes. But I noticed something terrible happening toward the begining of the 1990's, and that was easy finance to buy newer cars. This brought a generation up on giving their basic repairs to garages, with the hourly rate rising from £30 an hour to over £80 an hour with Volvo and GM in the UK. The Haynes manual has had sales of its books more than halved since this time.

This generation of fathers and mothers have instilled in their offspring that 'specialists' do the repairing of everyday items, or you throw them away and buy new with the current batch of imported built-in-obsolescence. Credit = No Basic Knowledge = Built-In-Obsolescence = Buy New...

I now live in Hungary where people patch up and make do. They have a mirriad of tools to hand for just such fixes. My brother inlaw has a 23 year old 340,000 mile Mercedes 190 diesel that threw its clutch two weeks ago. A quick visit to a parts shop and we had it up and running by evening light. A garage here would have charged $80 just to sniff the car; we fixed it for that much.

Davos has put up pictures of all the newly imported cars that sit at the docksides of the USA and the UK. Car companies around the globe are crashing for the lack of finance that people cannot get. Friends with garages in the UK are finding older and older cars are being brought to them to fix because people just can't afford to trade them in. The shock when they realise they can get another 100,000 miles out of these cars with simple maintainence is surprising many.

I travelled for years and came back to the UK in 2000. When I finally needed a car, I went to a scrap yard and offered £60 for a little Citroen with a dented door. A second-hand door was sitting on the back seat. I painted the door the same colour as the car, fitted 2 brake pipes on the front and a pair of front tyres and the car sailed through the government test to allow it back on the road. I polished it until the black paint gleamed like a new pin and treated it to wheel trims and a good clean inside and out. The next year it went through the same test again without turning a bolt. I put 18,000 miles on the car over 4 years before I gave it to a friend, and she's still using it to this day!! Not bad for something that was going to be crushed?

We need to get back our survival skills again, the way things used to be when we added up what change we had in our pockets and made do with what we had. In my signature below, you'll find John Taylor Gatto has written a piece called 'The Six Lesson School Teacher'. This part here is specific to what I've written above :-

"  This is another way I teach the lesson of dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. This is the most important lesson of all, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. It is no exaggeration to say that our entire economy depends upon this lesson being learned. Think of what would fall apart if kids weren't trained in the dependency lesson: The social-service businesses could hardly survive, including the fast-growing counseling industry; commercial entertainment of all sorts, along with television, would wither if people remembered how to make their own fun; the food services, restaurants and prepared-food warehouses would shrink if people returned to making their own meals rather than depending on strangers to cook for them. Much of modern law, medicine, and engineering would go too -- the clothing business as well -- unless a guaranteed supply of helpless people poured out of our schools each year. We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know any other way. For God's sake, let's not rock that boat!  "

None of what I've written above is directed 'At' you, my reasoning is that it is the way things have developed over the past few decades. If we're truly going backward in our lifestyles in the future, then this is another facet requiring our collective attention...

Best,

Paul

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britinbe
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Re: Be Responsible! ;-)
Vanityfox451 wrote:

Hi Jessme,

'Woodman' put up this thread :-

Anyone Making Changes...

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/anyone-making-changes-their-car/14362

...I wrote my take on it but will add more for you here.

When I was a teenager growing up in the UK, finance was just for the very rich to afford. People made do with what they had and 'scrap yards' were the places you visited to keep your 'old hack' roadworthy. People of all ages kept their cars serviced and in full fettle in the best ways they could, sharing knowledge as to what goes where and how. I learnt how to swap a gearbox over from watching and not reading technical books. Suspension re-fits, brake rebuilds, electical diagnostics, grinding and welding, re-paints, cleaning and polishing - kept old cars travelling long trips for those once a year holidays to the coast, after a year-long wait in preparation and being land-locked.

At 16 I was teaching friends how to service an engine. Points, condensor, distributor cap, rotor arm, high tension leads, spark plugs, air-filter, oil and filter - gaps cleaned and gauged, electrical contacts emery sanded and lightly greased with vasaline - brake linings adjusted for pedal travel; all of this completed in an hour and a half and guaranteeing your chariot remained reliable for the journey ahead and that you'd past this knowledge onto keen on-lookers, who in future would do the same for another crowd.

Making the engine in a Mini reliable isn't rocket science. The engine was developed by Alex Issigonis and became the main variant in many British cars. This was the A series engine and grew from 1948 as an 803cc engine, right upto 2001 as a 1275cc engine; all much the same, with added pipework and electronic ignition and injection instead of carburettor to mix the air and petrol.

These abilities were common knowledge and expected of you as wrote. Books for every marque of automobile were thumbed regularly with oily fingers with the best of them made by Haynes. But I noticed something terrible happening toward the begining of the 1990's, and that was easy finance to buy newer cars. This brought a generation up on giving their basic repairs to garages, with the hourly rate rising from £30 an hour to over £80 an hour with Volvo and GM in the UK. The Haynes manual has had sales of its books more than halved since this time.

This generation of fathers and mothers have instilled in their offspring that 'specialists' do the repairing of everyday items, or you throw them away and buy new with the current batch of imported built-in-obsolescence. Credit = No Basic Knowledge = Built-In-Obsolescence = Buy New...

I now live in Hungary where people patch up and make do. They have a mirriad of tools to hand for just such fixes. My brother inlaw has a 23 year old 340,000 mile Mercedes 190 diesel that threw its clutch two weeks ago. A quick visit to a parts shop and we had it up and running by evening light. A garage here would have charged $80 just to sniff the car; we fixed it for that much.

Davos has put up pictures of all the newly imported cars that sit at the docksides of the USA and the UK. Car companies around the globe are crashing for the lack of finance that people cannot get. Friends with garages in the UK are finding older and older cars are being brought to them to fix because people just can't afford to trade them in. The shock when they realise they can get another 100,000 miles out of these cars with simple maintainence is surprising many.

I travelled for years and came back to the UK in 2000. When I finally needed a car, I went to a scrap yard and offered £60 for a little Citroen with a dented door. A second-hand door was sitting on the back seat. I painted the door the same colour as the car, fitted 2 brake pipes on the front and a pair of front tyres and the car sailed through the government test to allow it back on the road. I polished it until the black paint gleamed like a new pin and treated it to wheel trims and a good clean inside and out. The next year it went through the same test again without turning a bolt. I put 18,000 miles on the car over 4 years before I gave it to a friend, and she's still using it to this day!! Not bad for something that was going to be crushed?

We need to get back our survival skills again, the way things used to be when we added up what change we had in our pockets and made do with what we had. In my signature below, you'll find John Taylor Gatto has written a piece called 'The Six Lesson School Teacher'. This part here is specific to what I've written above :-

"  This is another way I teach the lesson of dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. This is the most important lesson of all, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. It is no exaggeration to say that our entire economy depends upon this lesson being learned. Think of what would fall apart if kids weren't trained in the dependency lesson: The social-service businesses could hardly survive, including the fast-growing counseling industry; commercial entertainment of all sorts, along with television, would wither if people remembered how to make their own fun; the food services, restaurants and prepared-food warehouses would shrink if people returned to making their own meals rather than depending on strangers to cook for them. Much of modern law, medicine, and engineering would go too -- the clothing business as well -- unless a guaranteed supply of helpless people poured out of our schools each year. We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know any other way. For God's sake, let's not rock that boat!  "

None of what I've written above is directed 'At' you, my reasoning is that it is the way things have developed over the past few decades. If we're truly going backward in our lifestyles in the future, then this is another facet requiring our collective attention...

Best,

Paul

I remember these kinds of sessions with my dad.  We fixed everything incl rebuilding the engine of my first car.  Recently, I seviced our own car because I objected to spending €300 on an oil ad filter change change; it cost me €55 and 30 minutes broken up by lunch on Saturday 

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