California Drought

27 posts / 0 new
Last post
marshall61866's picture
marshall61866
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 7 2012
Posts: 1
California Drought

There the governor goes making things complicated again, which of course is how governments always seem to do things. If they want to reduce water usage by 25% raise everyone's rates by 25% !  This is simple and fair, no water police needed. Oh, but it will hurt the poor, you say. If they cut their water usage by the required 25% their monthly bill would not go up! Simple. They might also consider doubling the rates on any households that use twice the average household, simple! Makes common sense to me.                                                marshall 61866

 

jamster777's picture
jamster777
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 2 2012
Posts: 21
When I lived in Monterey, CA

When I lived in Monterey, CA I remember answering a survey from the water company about the number of people in the household and the amount of acreage so that they could compute the cut offs of the different rate tiers. The lowest tier was pretty generous and affordable but if you got into a higher tier the marginal cost went up really fast. I think I would reduce the amount of water charged at the lowest price tier to a bare bones minimum that would provide enough for cooking, cleaning and a little laundry but force you into the higher tiers for "luxury" high volume uses like lawn watering, pool filling, and long, non-flow-restricted showers.  

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
Time to Leave CA?

My wife and I moved out of Santa Cruz, CA about 4 years ago for economic reasons:  we were not finding good jobs and we couldn't afford to purchase a home.  Now the drought issue has come to the fore front.

Record low snow packs indicate that this summer will be even dryer.  (Snow pack is the source of summer water.)

Questions for California PP members:  

1.  How are you responding to this issue?  

2.  Are you considering moving away from California?

3.  If not, what specific information might change your mind?

Is it time for CA preppers and resilient livers to consider moving?

If we wait for the consensus opinion to swing fully into the need-to-move camp, you won't be able to sell your house.  And you will be emigrating WITH millions of others.  If moving is where you will ultimately end up, wouldn't it be good to figure this out BEFORE the masses?

 

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2247
Sand_Puppy said:"Questions

Sand_Puppy said:

"Questions for California PP members:  

1.  How are you responding to this issue?  

2.  Are you considering moving away from California?

3.  If not, what specific information might change your mind?

Is it time for CA preppers and resilient livers to consider moving?

If we wait for the consensus opinion to swing fully into the need-to-move camp, you won't be able to sell your house.  And you will be emigrating WITH millions of others.  If moving is where you will ultimately end up, wouldn't it be good to figure this out BEFORE the masses?"

Your last paragraph is where my thinking would be, Sand_Puppy.  I don't live in CA, but I had family who lived in Southern CA, and I was very relieved when they moved back east.  And that was a few years ago, even before the drought was as big a concern. 

It is possible the drought could end, and the water shortage would no longer be the risk it is.  But betting on that is a gamble.  And the downside consequences of taking that risk, if the drought does continue, could be huge.  So from a risk management perspective, I would have your exact same concerns.  

One of the lessons I try to teach my son (and live by, myself) is that the easiest way to solve a problem is to avoid it in the first place.  I would not want to find myself, in the future, in the parts of CA affected by the drought if it were to continue, trying to cope or get out at the same time as millions of others.  You have the advantage right now of time and foresight.  But I know, it is much easier said than done!

Good luck with your decision!

 

Time2help's picture
Time2help
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 2839
RE: Time to Leave CA?

It's always a good time to leave California.

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2008
Posts: 2247
Drought Number One Emergency in California-Ellen Brown

http://usawatchdog.com/drought-number-one-emergency-in-california-ellen-brown/

So, with just one year’s worth of water left in California, what is being done other than conservation?  Brown, shockingly, says, “There are no solutions that are happening right now.  We have had conservation and toilets that use less water, but I don’t see the government doing anything that will fix the problem right now. . . . The plan seems to be charge more for water, but that doesn’t fix the problem.  I have read that officials have said we have no backup plan.”

Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Ellen Brown, creator of the “Web of Debt Blog,” which can be found on EllenBrown.com.

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
California Drought: From the Ecological Outside in

It seems to me that the California drought offers a clear risk of ecological collapse.  Though California collapse is NOT a certainty, it is a real risk.  Some of the collapse principles discussed here on pp might apply.

One of the principles of collapse oft discussed is that collapse proceeds from the outside in.  Ecologically, the "outside" can include fishing villages, the edges of a suburban sprawl, South Dakota shale towns, and cities located in deserts.   

Another is that we are surprised when collapse happens--even when it was a process unfolding over time and leaving a visible trail of evidence--somehow we just don't get it. (World War Z "Tenth Man" quote.)   Another way of saying this, is that until A Possible future scenario becomes The Single Most Probable scenario, we reject it.  Then when it happens, we are shocked.

Another is that collapse happens gradually, then all of a sudden.

Another is that as complex societies fail, we will be turned back to a subsistence farming / small-town-business-craftsmen type of social order.  The local carrying capacity of a geographical area becomes important again.   Were it not for fleets of 18 wheelers bringing in food and hundreds of pumping stations delivering water, how many people could live in an area?

Another is to collapse early and avoid the rush.  (Thanks Dimitri)

Another is that human beings will fight over scarce resources.  An 300 mile long canal that carries water away from one water starved community to another is at risk for being disrupted or diverted even if the distant community legally owns the water rights. 

 

The California Aqueduct brings water from the Owens River to LA.  The Owens Valley was a lush farmland in the early 1900s.  After LA gained control of the water rights to the river it reverted back to desert.  Farmers fought for control of the river, but lost when federal troops were brought in to defend LA's water rights.

The Colorado River Aqueduct

If I were living in California right now, I would be exploring my options for re-locating.  At least starting the thought process.  If I needed to leave, where would I go?  What are property values like there?  How big a house do I want?  Is the extended family going to be living with me soon?  Do I want to garden and raise chickens myself, or should I look for an apartment/house in a smaller town surrounded by farmers?  

How would you expect the value of your current California home to fare should a mass exodus from the state begin?  Would I like to sell my home before or during the exodus?  

Collapse early and avoid the rush.

--Dimitri Orlov

 

lambertad's picture
lambertad
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 31 2013
Posts: 179
Interesting times

Sand_puppy,

I think your comments are spot on, but I just wanted to provide a little example to back up your view.

I'm living out here in SLC, Utah and a few months ago a local university released a report regarding our water situation. It turns out, that our most recent 50 years were the second wettest 50 years in a 1200 year span. They figured this out by looking at the tree rings of a certain type of tree (I forget the specie/s).

So, the problem isn't that our most recent 50 years were the second wettest on record, it's the fact that we built our expectations/future predictions on these most recent 50 years thinking it would persist. Some day soon reversion to the mean will happen and we'll swing the opposite direction and we are going to have a tough decade(s)/centuries. Things are going to have to shrink, and by things I mean lawns, shower times, the number of car washes, the size of gardens, the number of boats on the shrinking reservoirs, etc. There are literally no other options.

We plan on moving out of SLC as soon as my wife and I are done with grad school. She's going to be making at least $30,000/yr more than me unless I get an amazing residency, so I'm totally fine with working part time or not at all while getting our farmstead up and running. I'm used to hard work (grew up on a farm) and feel like providing for my family and putting in an honest days work on a farm is more fulfilling than just about any office job every could be.

I've got some areas in mind, but that could all change by the time we're done with school.

Great post and thanks for reminding us that things are always changing and we need to be ahead of the curve, even if the curve is only herd mentality.

 

Time2help's picture
Time2help
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 2839
William Shatner wants Seattle's water; proposes pipeline

William Shatner wants Seattle's water; proposes pipeline

"I want $30 billion in my Kickstarter campaign to build a pipeline, like the Alaska pipeline, say from Seattle, a place where there's a lot of water, there's too much water," Shatner said. "And bring it down here and fill up one of our lakes."

I miss Spock.

agitating prop's picture
agitating prop
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: May 28 2009
Posts: 863
Major desalination plants in

Major desalination plants in planning stages all up and down the coast to provide drinking cooking bathwater for Californians. If you think the powers that be are going to let trillions of dollars worth of real estate crater in a crucial military and commercial zone...you are underestimating the prime motivators of human beings -- greed AND fear. 

If I was living on the California coast I would relax. Inland empire?  I would be getting my ditch kit ready. We are all going to be subject to crazy high produce prices for quite some time.

But good news is the drought is going to require new farming methods, and hopefully destroy agribusiness as it is currently construed --- and the insane cruelty of factory farms. Millions of pigs send a victory chorus of oinks across a bacon saturated land. 

kanute's picture
kanute
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 21 2014
Posts: 34
desal

For a state that likes to cast itself as environmentally forward thinking the thought of using massive amounts of electricity to turn ocean water into drinking water seems insane.  Carbon footprint issues aside, I seem to recall rolling blackouts in that state not long ago.  It's one thing if you lose your air conditioning, quite a bit worse to lose your water AND air.

Jbarney's picture
Jbarney
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 26 2010
Posts: 233
Thoughts of California

I got home from work this afternoon and did some work outside.  It is dry up here in Vermont, but hardly so dry as California.  My main concern is having water available for the summer garden (just put the peas in) and worrying that they drying trend is something that could affect the entire nation.  I know, California is all the way across the continent....but it is dry up here in Vermont as well.  The local news networks announced this week that the state is under a burn warning, spreading the news that spring lawn burns etc., are a bad idea right now.  I am almost done raking my yard (finally) and much of my ground is cracked, parched for not much rain.  Again, these are not conditions anywhere close to out West....but I want to avoid anything like that...do what I can to prep....

Acquired a five hundred gallon plastic water tank.  Don't want to go into any more debt to purchase rain gutters, (although, I will this summer)...so I have my 55 gallon sap drums from the sugaring season under the roof of my house....ready to collect any rain that moves through tonight.  The sun is setting, and a cold front is moving through.  It is a small prepping success...but even if I collect several gallons of rain, I will bring it to my collection tank and at least have some water for my garden in throughout the spring.

Just my prepping thoughts...My heart goes out to you guys in California.

Jason

Jbarney's picture
Jbarney
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 26 2010
Posts: 233
sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
Migrations: As the collapse moves

I have family and lots of personal history in California.  So the images of the drought activate my limbic system.

I moved to California at a time when the world's population was less than half what it is now--that is, in  1960.  I witnessed the rich orchard lands of the Santa Clara Valley converted into wall-to-wall suburban housing.  Air pollution appeared sporadically during my childhood and we marveled at the oddity of not being able to see the big telescope on top of Mount Hamilton some days.  Now the telescope is rarely visible.  San Jose has always been technically a desert with less than 11 inches of annual rainfall,  but great canals brought melted snow into the city.

Things steadily changed.

Everyone who lived there shared a sick kind of background awareness that this could not go on.  We would shake our heads and ask "What is the world coming too?"  Some used the phrase "the country is headed in the wrong direction."  Now, I understand that what we were observing was the collision of increasing population and declining resources.

As everyone who has listened to Chris knows, collapse doesn't happen instantly everywhere equally.  Each resource crisis has its own patterns and way of spreading.  

The next thing that happens are the migrations.

Imagine if 10% of California's 38 million residents decide to leave.

What good is it to know the abstract principles of The Crash Course, if one cannot recognize these principles in play as they become specific and pertinent in their own lives?

 

Knowing and Not Knowing

Each of us has our own personality defense mechanisms to protect our "sense of self" from painful experiences.  The most common by far is denial (and its variations) -- non-awareness of something disturbing that is actually knowable.  Others, like myself (and others at pp), have a counter-phobic defense, where we actively go looking for signs of developing trouble and want learn the details before the crisis is full blown.

How are the rest of you responding to this?

 

 

 

 

 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
Believe it or not

Mark,

The whole "paddle faster, I hear banjos" reputation of the deep south is keeping most of the Californians out of here, at least as far as the inland areas of SC are concerned (not sure about places like Myrtle Beach and Charleston.) I met one person from CA in the greater Columbia SC area in the last six years, and she could not wait to move out. All those churches! And the horrible conservatives! They all voted for Bush! We're all redneck idjits makin' moonshine who drive pickup trucks. And we're stoopid to boot. (Nope. But go on believing that, by all means...)

What I've discovered is that the low-tax, long-growing season, low population density south seems to have some sort of anti-California cooties. We'd absorb some folks easily if they wanted to come here. But they seem to shie away

SingleSpeak's picture
SingleSpeak
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 1 2008
Posts: 505
Leaving California

ain't as easy as loading up the truck and heading out. 

I've thought about it a lot. I've looked at areas where I have some family like Kansas City and Santa Fe. But Santa Fe is dry too and Kansas City, well it's Kansas City wink

Then there is the fact that my music school is still chugging along and my wife's job is still chugging along and we're a few miles from the beach and we see friends leave for other states and half of them come back, usually due to weather. Throw in that the majority of my family and my wife's family live nearby and I'm pushing 60 so I'm not exactly in the homesteading frame of mind.

As far as water is concerned, it's not looking good and it's bound to get worse.

Still in San Diego County, where I'm at, I see the golf courses are still green. Therefore we do have some things that can be cut back on before water starts getting rationed to 10 gallons a day per person or whatever ends up happening. And if that happens we're all going to smell bad so we'll probably get used to it.

I already let the lawn die and we do the 5 minute shower thing, and as time goes on we can make other adjustments, as every one of you will have to adjust to what lies ahead for your area.

So we're going to stick it out here contending with taxes and the Socialists. We'll try to fly under the radar so they don't banish us. 

Sometimes you just have to make a stand and ride it out. I'd rather go down swinging in ol' Cal-ee-forn-eye-aye with my family nearby than escape to some paradise (where you are) without them.

So yeah, don't worry about us. Sorry, got to run. Surf's up! cool

SS
 

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
Water Knife: A near-future novel of the battle over water

The Water Knife, by Paolo Bacigalupi is a new work of fiction set in the southwestern United States amid prolonged drought, sandstorms and competition for the scarce water turns violent. Aquifers are dry and the Colorado River is slowing to a trickle. The lives of millions in the desert cities are in jeopardy.

The term "knife" refers to a hit-man / enforcer for the mafia-like gangs that enforce water usage rules and fight to destroy competing cartels.  The protagonist is a "knife" for the Las Vegas Cartel as it struggles to survive against Phoenix.  It is an action / suspense novel primarily.

The story captures an era where entire cities are destroyed as their water is cut off by legal and extra-legal means.

Apparently this novel was inspired by the historical book Cadillac Desert that chronicles intrigue in the real life issue of water politics through the 20th century.

Paolo Bacigalupi is a fantastic writer making real the implications of the eco-apocalypses that might be looming in the future.   Wind-Up Girl was my favorite recommended here by HughK.  (thanks Hugh).

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
California Is Literally Sinking Into the Ground

California Is Literally Sinking Into the Ground

Joseph Poland of the US Geological Survey used a utility pole to document where a farmer would have been standing in 1925 and 1955 and where Poland was then standing in 1977 after land in the San Joaquin Valley had sunk nearly 30 feet. US Geological Survey

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
California: Running On Empty

California: Running On Empty (< Click the link for the full article).

Let us face elemental reality. A 40-million person California is an iffy place. It is entirely dependent on a sophisticated, man-created infrastructure of dams, reservoirs, canals, pumps, freeways, rail lines, airports, and schools and universities. Given that the population continues to rise, and given that one in four Californians was not born in the United States and is often poor (California has the largest population in real and relative numbers below the poverty line; one sixth of the nation on welfare payments of some sort lives in California), there is no margin of safety. A drought is but a metaphor about the collapse of an entire way of living....

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
California Homeowners...

If you are near the point where you are considering selling a home in California, this seems to me to be a really good time to think more deeply on the subject.  California homes are fantastically expensive and the equity stored in a home is at risk during a market downturn.  A California housing market down turn seems very likely.  It might be a good time to "cash out."

 

1.  We have the general housing price bubble (thanks CHS) correction.  

2.  Mortgage interest rate increases seem likely.  This reduces the monthly payment a new buyer can afford, and hence, the sale price.

And factors specific to California:

3.  The drought!!  Towns in the central valley have dry wells.

4.  aquifer depletion

5.  the social impacts of some 1 million poor agricultural workers suddenly become unemployed.

6.  Soil moisture content reductions can be expected to kill grasslands, brush and forests.  Forest fires are already a big problem, and this summer seems very likely to be much worse than average.

7.  The financial impacts of loss of wineries and agriculture will cut deeply into the states fiscal health and tax revenues.  California agriculture is a 17 billion dollar industry. 

8.  Unemployment benefits force the states to borrow from the fed creating debt that will need to be repaid.  California is already the biggest borrower for the unemployment benefits.

For a California renter, it seems reasonable to say, "Well lets just wait and see how bad it gets.  If El Nino comes the situation might improve."   But for the homeowner at risk for loosing equity, staying ahead of the curve is important.  You'd like to sell before the housing price falls.  We have to catch on to the trend early.

But that is just my personality style.  And I don't know what the future holds, either.

 

 

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 1920
Building a home made water cistern cheaply

A very creative family is living off-grid, (possibly in Mexico or Central America?).  They have a website Velacreations that includes a how to section on building a water cistern.  They use low tech and simple tools and supplies.  For people who might need to store water gathered from periodic rainfall this seemed very pertinent.

The have great pictures.  Here is a basic description of the process.

1.  cover a level spot of earth with sand, 8' in diameter, and pat down to create a firm level spot.

2.  lay a ring of bricks along the circumference of the circle.

3.  4' x 8' sheets of metal are drilled and bolted together to create the walls.  Set the wall on the ring of bricks.

4.  A couple of drainage holes are cut in the bottom of the wall and PVC pipe fittings installed.

5.  A pond liner is put inside.

6.  A roof is added to limit evaporation.  It is made of PVC pipe and pond liner.

This cistern holds about 1500 gallons.

jgritter's picture
jgritter
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2011
Posts: 273
Thoughts

There don't seem to be any Californians in Michigan either.  

So I find myself sitting on my front porch enjoying a heart breakingly beautiful day ( a cold front swept through during the night with thunder, lightning, high winds and yet more rain ( my heart goes out to California ) sweeping away the hot wet blanket humidity of yesterday, leaving a breathtaking blue sky and a 65 degree breeze) thinking about migration.  The families on my block are like the lines of foam left on a beach.   60% white, 30% hispanic, 10% black.  The traces of waves of people fleeing poverty, whites from Europe a hundred years ago, blacks from the South 50 years ago, hispanics from Mexico now.  I wonder what will finally drive the Californians out, were will they go, how will they be received?  ( During my childhood in the Bay Area in the '60's I remember inland Californians were still being referred to, with denigration, as "Okies" )  My sister has lived in the Willamette Valley for over 20 years and considers herself an Oregonian.  Yet when asked were she's from she replies "I'm from Michigan and my mother was born in Tacoma (Washington)", denying her Californian origins ( she, and I, were born in San Francisco ).

So, musings.  I have family in San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles and San Diego, and I worry.

John G.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
a partial answer

jgritter, here is a partial answer to your question, from USA Today: click on the map for the accompanying article, and a scalable map

 

Eandori's picture
Eandori
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: May 13 2015
Posts: 1
Why I moved out of CA

I grew up in Chico CA (Northern California, close to Sacramento) and attended Chico State for Engineering.  Everybody I knew there got jobs in the Bay Area but I left for greener pastures, literally.  I left all friends/family behind 15 years ago to start anew in Hillsboro OR.  Why?  It was really simple.  The cost of living was half of the Bay Area and the income was the same.  It seemed like simple math to me, I figured it would be easier to afford life and visit than be broke all the time but closer to people I love.

Over the years, that has turned out to be one of the best decisions I have ever made.  Nearly everybody else in my Engineering department that moved to the Bay Area is either still trying to scratch together a living style that builds wealth of any kind, or they have given up and left with not much to show for their years of effort.  Somebody earlier in this thread said their job was "chugging along" well I have news for you... "chugging along" in CA can directly translate to "massive upward mobility" in another area.  My wife and I now have a nearly paid off home, decent sized retirement already, we have already done all our disaster preparations, and just a few months ago I bought my wife our first Porsche, paid for in cash.

Meanwhile, all my family and friends back in CA continue to struggle.  Some have gone bankrupt, some have barely stayed afloat.  Nearly NONE of them are anywhere close to as successful as those whom left.  It's now at the point where I have needed to start concealing how well we are doing when we visit because all it does is bring up feelings of jealousy.

Still... it amazes me that even though I can clearly describe via life experience, or show via math on paper why all my loved ones should ALSO leave California... nearly nobody does.  It has become my life experience that MOST people are either incapable or simply unwilling to make massive life changes when simple logic shows it would be for the best.  The family and best friends... you don't lose those.  You only lose contact with people you kind of cared about.  And guess what, you meet others in your new area to replace them.

It's quite clear to me now... MOST people will not move until they are forced to move.  People who are confident enough to take control of their own lives are not common, they are the exception.

SingleSpeak's picture
SingleSpeak
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 1 2008
Posts: 505
I was the one

you referred to with the "chugging along" statement.

I'm glad you have done so well and are so pleased with your life, but I wouldn't trade my meager existence for your "massive upward mobility" Eandori. 

Why is it that so many people assume that others want the same things that they want? Why do people assume that financial success is the only "real" meaning of success. Why would one assume that staying in an area that I love, with people that I love, doing work that I love, etc. is taking less control of my life than someone that moved away?

Just wondering.

SS
 

 

 

jgritter's picture
jgritter
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2011
Posts: 273
Tolerance

An interesting article, I found the last line about migrants to the south being tolerated, but not welcome, to be quite telling.  

The question for Californians, and the rest of the South West, would seem to be what happens when thier situation becomes untenable, when nature finally forces thier hand, when the issue isn't one of social mobility and life style, but of life itself.  Evidence from places like Chaco and Mesa Verde would seem to suggest that a prolonged drought can drop the population of an advanced civilization to zero.  

Fasinating and terriffying. 

John G.

tictac1's picture
tictac1
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 25 2009
Posts: 175
cistern

Unfortunately, that is not cheap.  I bought two factory blem 1200 gallon tanks for $400, each far less than the steel alone would cost you, not to mention a pond liner.  I've got a total of 12,400 gallons of water storage, and for Californians, factory blem tanks are still the best option.

Most people here and in the rest of the US have no clue what is happening here, and really don't seem to want to know.  Willful ignorance, i guess.

Even if you eliminated residential use, we'd STILL be in a water-negative state.  Ag use is tremendous, and "environmental use" is even higher.  This is water that is mostly just allowed to go out to sea, due to the environmental laws we have here (not that they are all bad).  So these water restrictions are just a dog-n-pony, they have no real impact on the situation.  In my area, the truly wealthy flaunt the restrictions anyway, watering their gigantic lawns in high winds at 4pm.  They can afford the fines.

Our grape growers have lowered our water table about 110 feet since I've been here.  Many people either punch a new, deeper and more expensive well, or lose their home.  I see drilling rigs literally every day where I live.  Grape growers continue to store water in huge ag ponds that lose 1"/day to evaporation, no one will stop them.  Now we are facing well metering and taxation, with the res users bearing 80% of the cost, and ag users doing 90% of the pumping.

This is fascism 101, folks.  Government/corporate alliance.  The people's voices here are unified, it makes no difference.

As for my family, we use composting toilets, drip irrigation, stored rain water, and pump black water to irrigate shrubs that create a much-needed microclimate.  Literally no water is wasted.  Do I think this will catch on?  Of course not.  I'm teaching my children a more sustainable way of life, not deluding myself into thinking I'm making a difference in the current crisis.

Thus endeth your update from the front lines.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments