supermarket closing: some thoughts

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Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
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supermarket closing: some thoughts

A local supermarket chain had too many competitors--and who knows, maybe problems with pension obligations--and the one near us is closing. My husband and I were out running errands and he suggested we stop in since they were clearing the shelves at 25% off.  I was blasé about walking through the store looking for bargains: we had everything we needed, but he felt like looking so I tagged along. Keep in mind that the butcher had been let go last week, and there was no fresh dairy delivered either, but I thought certain other things I noticed were significant, so I am recording them here.

First of all, the soda pop, candy, beer, and snack food aisles were stripped bare. All of the convenience foods--frozen pizzas, stove top stuffing, instant coffee, cans of baked beans or stew---were mostly gone. Mixes, like cake mixes, were about half gone. Anything you had to cook from scratch with was pretty much still there. The healthy food was mostly still intact; the junk and bad-for-you stuff had flown off the shelves. I could have bought all the green tea and vitamins and vegetables I wanted.

While I was astounded that the junk and convenience foods went first, all I could think of was how quickly the fresh meat. milk, and eggs went when there were no more deliveries. It was sobering. We can easily get cage-free eggs and fresh organic chicken, but as a result of this experience we are now investigating local sources of milk.

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blackeagle
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What you describe is the result of decades of ease

Wendy,

Don't be surprised. The North American society is conditioned to eat at first industrial processed foods (the easy way) then, when there is no choice left, they cook. Of course, this is a simplified image. The reality is much diversified. But, what we first see from outside is this simplified picture. This is unfortunately the result of decades of industrialization and ease of life.

If you transpose this supermarket closure to another country, you will see a different pattern of depletion matching the local food culture (and for some countries the actual mindset about “goods availability” – think shortages).

It is in fact sobering to see the pattern you describe. The healthiest nutrition reflexes are simply not there.

JM

 

 

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and we are talking about a

and we are talking about a future collapse?....it's right in front of our very eyes as we speak. good post wendy...this site may well have it's value in alerting each other. tho like you, i don't need anything more...probably less if i think honestly  about it! tomorrow i will take another load out to the road where it will be taken/stolen in less than 1/2 hour....it saves me dump fees....so unload y'all while the pickers still pickin.

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ao
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this country is starving

Wendy,

You observation doesn't surprise me.  The past two weeks, for example, I have had 3 patients who drink 4-6 cans of diet soft drinks per day.  As one might expect, their physical health was atrocious.  And their cognitive and/or psychological health was impaired as well.  While these folks are each suffering individually, we all pay for this behavior collectively in terms of increased insurance premiums for health care as well as in a host of other ways.

I see many Americans as starving, not for calories but for micro-nutrients.  Here obesity is a disease of the poor.  We get plenty of calories but the nutritional content of those calories is poor.  We are not only starved for nutrition but starved in other ways as well. 

We are starved for love.  With the collapse of the family structure, we see record numbers of young women sleeping with young men and having children out of wedlock without the emotional, financial, or other means of properly taking care of these children and raising them to responsible adulthood.  The men often leave the women to raise their children alone.  What do their children have for an example?  They will tend to follow the patterns of the parents.  They will most likely eat in a substandard fashion and their brains will suffer as a consequence, making it difficult for them to obtain the education that could assist their rise out of the poverty they will most likely be raised in.  They will be more emotionally vulnerable and volatile as well, both as a consequence of their diet as well as the psychosocial environment they were raised in.  The mothers will spend money on tatoos and cigarettes and time on watching reality TV and soap operas but will tend not to spend that money on quality food nor time on taking their children to the library.

We are starved for intellectual food ... accurate, unbiased, vetted, comprehensive knowledge on almost every subject.  It is difficult for shortened attention spans and diminished cognitive processing capabilities (thanks to fluoride, aspartame, statins, geo-engineering metals, EMR exposure, electronic neuro-programming, etc.) to handle much more than soundbites or short little articles that say next to nothing.  Conversely, there is such information overload nowadays that the flakey 18 year old blogger's information or the bought-and-paid-for commercially driven source is often given as much weight by the undiscerning as the information from an older, wiser, more experienced, and better educated source.  Education is in decline in this country and not by accident but by design.  The decline is from kindergarten to the university level.  When one talks to teachers or university professors who have been in the field for 30-40 years, they all see the difference, virtually without exception.

We are slowly being starved of liberty and privacy.  We were called conspiracy theorists when we first discussed the following situation but today, even the MSM admitted to it.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/report-nsa-maps-persons-social-...

Isn't it interesting how all these conspiracies theories are, one by one, turning out to be conspiracy facts?  But this is just the tip of a very large iceberg.

We are starved for self-discipline and self-responsibility but the media controlled culture tells us we can have anything we want whenever we want it if we'll just buy into their line of materialist propaganda.  What is the ultimate source of such lies?

We are starved for spiritual food as well, the food that feeds wisdom and righteousness and the ability to know right from wrong in a sea of relativism.  We are in a world that is lost and wandering where Luciferian inversion has made wrong right and right wrong.  The Constitution is considered extremist and outdated but the Patriot Act and NDAA are necessary and there for our safety.  Illegal aliens are given more rights and perqs than honest citizens.  The family is under attack but marriage between two people of the same gender is not only accepted but, in one MSM article, actually promoted as a possibly better alternative to a heterosexual relationship.  Persecution of Christians has exceed that in the time of Rome (with 80 martyrs this week alone) with the president of the land of the free and the home of the brave not uttering a single word in their defense while at the same time promoting November as National Muslim Appreciation Month and granting special privileges and protections.  Does anyone think this is all happening by accident?

Sorry for drifting off the topic Wendy.  I just see the food selection decision as one pixel in a much, much larger and interrelated picture.  Awareness is the key.

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Sorry AO

It is not permitted to give you ten thumbs up.

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Opportunities as the Paradigm Changes

Depending on the local conditions, I see many opportunities for making huge gains.  However, those efforts will be made at the local areas.  They will only happen as people start to have their paradigms switch.

 

How many of the open spaces in churches or schools or housing could be transitioned into something that produces food?  I am moving back to Miami to be close to family, and I am planting citrus, avocado, moringa and other food forest starers in my families yards.  With any luck, it may turn into a side business.  If not, I am learning to grow soil and propagate trees that thrive in the tropical environment.  Who knows were that leads...

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...certain species of lemon

...certain species of lemon grass repel mosquitos... Think I will practice growing that too.  :)

 

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Beautiful post, AO and much common ground

Dear Wendy and AO,

Wendy, thanks for your topic.  I agree with feralhen that it's very thoughtful, and I continue to appreciate your insights.

Thanks for your beautiful post as well, AO, and I very much concur with the first 7 paragraphs.  

The eighth paragraph is a little tricky for me to write about.  From my view, it foments some amount of division and dualistic thinking on a few different levels; division between citizens and illegal immigrants, between straights and gays, between Christians and Muslims.  So, how do I point this out without also being divisive?  I'm not really sure, but I'll try my best.

I am not partial to any one religion, but I do try to live by a code that is not entirely of my own making, as it is inspired and guided by simple human decency as well as the spiritual teachings that have been most effective at helping me to become more peaceful, grounded, responsible, and tolerant.  This is a process and I still have a lot further to go.  Hopefully, all of us at PP are working towards such spiritual or personal development in a way that is authentic to us.

What I'm trying to say is that I affirm and tolerate the path that you have chosen and I think that one of the rich aspects of the Peak Prosperity community is that we come from many different perspectives and we have many different ideas and belief systems, and that's OK.  Because no matter what we think is going to happen after we die, our communities here on Earth, both here at Peak Prosperity and in our local towns, counties or cities, in our country, and on our little blue planet, are going to be the richer and more peaceful if there is a seat at the table for all.

Cheers,

Hugh

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balance and fairness
HughK wrote:

The eighth paragraph is a little tricky for me to write about.  From my view, it foments some amount of division and dualistic thinking on a few different levels; division between citizens and illegal immigrants, between straights and gays, between Christians and Muslims.  So, how do I point this out without also being divisive?  I'm not really sure, but I'll try my best.

I understand exactly what you're saying Hugh and I appreciate your sensitivity in the matter.  Indeed, this is a touchy area.  If I may clarify, I won't compromise on the statement between citizens and illegal immigrants.  One abides by the law, the other doesn't.  If one wishes to become a citizen of this country, there are legal channels to do so.  Taking an illegal channel is indeed, illegal.  If there is to be a rule of law, one must abide by the law.  If the law is perceived to be unjust, then one must seek to change the law through legal channels, not just choose to ignore it because it suits one.

On the issue of straights and gays and Christians and Muslims, I object to one group being treated "special" compared to another group, no more, no less.  For example, when ABC news presents an article on two lesbian parents of a little boy, it's the details of the article that I find illuminating.  The two women are attractive and have obviously been selected for their photogenic qualities, they are presented as serene and beatific, the baby boy is beautiful, the picture is lit and backgrounded in a matter befitting a photographer presenting a dream vacation destination, and the article explicitly cites research that a lesbian couple is more likely to have a harmonious relationship than a heterosexual couple.  Meanwhile, the same ABC that day presented multiple dysfunctional male/female married relationships in all their conflict and ugliness.  The contrast was obvious and suggests to me that the scales have swung out of balance.

Likewise, in NJ, a highway is being built.  Land was taken away from citizens by eminent domain to build an exit ramp.  That exit ramp was specifically requested to accomodate a mosque being built there.  Can you imagine such an accomodation being built for a Christian church?  Or more importantly, should rights of some citizens, regardless of their religion, be taken away to accomodate a particular religious group?  As another example, President Obama is speaking out regularly on the rights of Muslims and has given Muslims sensitive positions in our security apparatus but has said not a word about the horrendous persecution of Coptic Christians in Egypt nor has he sought to place any Christians in similar key positions.  Again, the contrast is obvious and the scales have swung out of balance. 

I'm not advocating that gay couples cannot have a civil union granting them legal rights equivalent to those of a straight married couple.  I'm not advocating that Muslims have less rights than Christians.  I'm advocating balance and fairness, no more, no less. 

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nice rant ao, i gave you the

nice rant ao, i gave you the 10th thumb...please note arthur

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ao, let's cordially disagree
ao wrote:

 I'm advocating balance and fairness, no more, no less. 

Hi again, ao,

Thanks for your kind reply.  I'm certainly all for balance and fairness.

We see these issues fairly differently, and I would wager that I'm not the only PP member who would not agree with some of your characterizations about our president's religious preferences/allegiances, or the belief that gays and Muslims are treated with favoritism in the United States. 

This whole conversation is really treading into the grounds of the more typical liberal-conservative political dichotomy that we generally do so well in transcending at Peak Prosperity.  In fact, these questions are somewhat off topic, and not closely connected to the three E's and developing personal resiliency, although Wendy's insightful original post certainly is on that topic  While it may be that the community here sometimes prefers as a whole to stray from PP's core focus, such as when many of us chose to post on the acute question of the Syria attack, I find that PP is strongest when we leave such issues to the side and focus on the longer-term trends and slow but chronic instabilities that are so often overlooked by our society.

So, I ask your permission to cordially disagree with the issues you framed in this post, as I have enjoyed many of your other posts, and I hope to continue to learn more from you on other matters.   I certainly appreciate the first 7 paragraphs of your original post on this thread.  If you want to write more on those topics, I will let you have the last word, and I will smile at the diversity of viewpoints here.  smiley

Cheers,

Hugh

 

 

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Microcosmic Anecdote

A friend worked up in a remote Alaska native village a few years ago on a road construction project. The project was to raise and improve the village main road so it wouldn't be as susceptible to flooding of the Kuskokwim River. An aerial map of the village looks like a fish skeleton. At one end of the main road is a gravel topped airport that can accommodate a C-130 aircraft. There are several commercial flights each week to Anchorage and the outside world. ATVs are the personal vehicle of choice, but there are a few trucks in the village. During the summer, barges can navigate the river and bring construction items and other large equipment. Otherwise, small fishing boats, sea planes, and wintertime snowmobiles are the transportation choices.

Cargo gets flown into the village 3 times a week. There is a small store near the airport that sells these items. Your bedroom is probably on the order of the same size as the store. It is a "dry" borough, so alcohol is illegal. The majority of the cargo is sugary soda pop - not even diet. He said the "fresh" produce could fit in an 11" X 17" cardboard box. Half of the produce section was potatoes. He said the natives wouldn't buy fresh foods, so nobody replenished it. If it didn't come in a box or a can, they didn't want it. He had to make a special request to get a head of lettuce for a salad.

The village has an electrical generator and distribution system that powers each house. According to my friend, every house has a television satellite dish. There is also a small library (same size as the store) with a free wifi internet. The wifi system worked 24/7. He used to sit on the steps of the library (after work) to use the internet to communicate with us in the lower 48. He said the library was open a couple hours each evening, but it was rarely used - and mostly to read glossy magazines.

Obesity and diabetes are rampant. Alcohol is illegal, but it still gets in. He said the bigger problem was drugs, since it is compact and more durable. The State of Alaska doles out money to the Natives and that is where they get the majority of income. Very few actually worked since there really weren't any jobs. Salmon fishing on the Kuskokwim was the main economic event of the year. Crime is focused on outsiders, since everyone knows what was stolen from whom. He said he lived out of a suitcase in a rented room and took all his belongings with him every day. He was very disturbed by it all.

I asked him if there were any positives. He mentioned a small group of young men who shunned the modern conveniences and lived a more traditional lifestyle. They were the village hunters and would go out and kill a moose, bring it back, and share with the villagers. They used gasoline engine powered boats and large caliber rifles, but they didn't sit in front of the boob tube, drink sodas, and feel disadvantaged. Because of powered boats and rifles, moose were difficult to find.

ao's rant reminded me of this conversation I had over lunch a few years back. Nutrition is part of the complete package, but by itself, good nutrition won't right the listing ship. Culturally, they aren't used to the modern conveniences or economic largess. It is all new to them. They don't know how to fight the temptations.

I see folks down here who have far more opportunities (if they know how to look and are willing to work.) It isn't a lucrative now as it used to be, but there are many more opportunities here than in remote Alaska. Nevertheless, I see people here fall into the same trap of poor nutrition, laziness, and the culture of envy that is promoted by commercial television. It is just pathetic.

Grover

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micronutients and the typical Western diet

Thanks for bringing up the side effects of eating obviously bad-for-you "food", AO. Factory food and crops grown in depleted, artificially fertilized soil are indeed less healthy. I've been taking a vitamin and mineral supplement (this one - read the label) for about 20 years now. I take a half-dose since I get so many nutrients from healthy food and I don't want to OD on things like Vitamin A. The more I eat from my garden, the less I need to supplement.

Understand that everyone's body is different, but in my case without the micronutrients, when I started I needed 10 hours of sleep. With the micronutrients, I only need six hours a night. I also do not catch colds and flu when I have the right micronutrients.

Yes, America and those who emulate her cheap and vapid diet are turning into one vast food desert. But the reason I brought up the fact that the healthy and effort-involved food was not moving off the shelves was this insight: Even if we have healthy, fresh, local food most folks either do not know how to cook it or won't want to.

I'm reminded of a friend who ran a food bank back in NY. A first-time client was offered powdered milk, rice, canned tuna, canned vegetables, soup and a bag each of flour and sugar - things like that. "Where are the cold cuts? We like cold cuts," complained the woman who was being served. My friend told her to come back when she was really in trouble.

If we are given the luxury of a slow decline, we will need to teach those who are really in trouble how to make simple things from scratch. If it's a crash...people with the easy-food mindset will be a big part of the problem.

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Thetallestmanonearth
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Hagens?

Saw the same thing recently at the Hagens grocery store near where I live.  I went in our their last day and the empty shelves and despondent staff made it feel like I was glimpsing the future.

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Smoke and mirrors

ao,

I have a feeling that promotion of what are generally perceived as "progressive" topics are there for those "liberals" who are still under the delusion that we have a functioning democracy.  Anything that doesn't impact the financial structure is tolerated. Remember what happened to Martin Luther King when he expanded his reach beyond civil rights issues into the Vietnam war and poverty in general.  I am pretty sure the nothing has been done about immigration because what it does to labor rates.  It is awfully easy to take advantage of a labor force that  have no rights at all.  Work them hard for a couple of weeks and then fire them without pay, who are they going to complain to?  Perhaps that's where we're all headed, in some ways we're already there with two set of laws and financial regulations.

Public private partnerships (includes a lot of "off site improvements" funded by the tax payer), the competition between states to keep jobs around which shifts more of the tax burden onto the general populace, how about the price tag for the huge stadiums that get foisted onto the public, NFL not paying taxes, etc. etc. The amount of public money that get shuffled into private hands is rather staggering.  I don't think that one ramp for a mosque is our problem.

This is just a scramble for "believers" of any kind as the empire comes to an end.  Money has no morals or belief system, it clings to its own ends and whatever methods it can get ahold of.  I wouldn't read anything else into it.  If there is anything to be read into it, its divide and conquer.  Sorry to climb down back into this black hole of cynicism and darkness, haven't been down here in a while.

 

 

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Hugh, Thank you for your

Hugh,

Thank you for your cordial and gentlemanly reply.  While we may disagree respectfully with one another on some issues, my sense is we probably agree with one another on a whole lot more issues.  Your politeness and decency in the discussion is very much appreciated. 

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People are emotionally starved study. CBC

Touches on some good points. My 31 year old son which feels that loneliness sent me this.

NN

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HughK wrote:We see these
HughK wrote:

We see these issues fairly differently, and I would wager that I'm not the only PP member who would not agree with some of your characterizations about our president's religious preferences/allegiances, or the belief that gays and Muslims are treated with favoritism in the United States.

I'll have to agree with ao on this one.  For more than 20 years, the company I worked for had "Diversity" hiring and promotion goals.  As you know, the diversity movement encompasses everyone on the planet except caucasian, heterosexual males.  In theory, the company I worked for would choose between two equally qualified people based on their diversity qualifications.  In fact, they would frequently be reluctant to fill a position, until they could find a diverse candidate.

The emphasis even extended to summer interns.  The poster showing the summer hires would rarely show more than 3 male caucasians out of 20 summer hires.

I'm old enough to remember the term "equal opportunity," old enough to be frustrated.  

A friend and I were paddling down a small river in Western Michigan recently.  We portaged over a weir and then paddled over literally thousands of trout waiting to go up stream to spawn.  Fishing season was obviously closed and the DNR was making sure that no one violated the ban.  A few hundred yards downstream, we passed a couple of teenage "Native Americans" bow fishing.  

My friend very politely mentioned that he thought that the fishing season was closed.  He graciously didn't point out that no one is normally allowed to take any game fish with anything other than a hook and line.  One of the teenagers replied that the ban didn't apply to "Native Americans."  My friend responded that he was a Native American and that he had lived in Michigan his entire life.

Abhoring discrimination is not racist.  Discrimination over extended periods of time is the best way to increase racism and resentment that I can think of.

If you argue that Diversity is not discrimination, like our country tries to teach us, then look up the definition of discrimination in the dictionary.

Les

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Religion

I agree with your insightful comments. I just thought I'd mention a time when all Europeans on the continent were Christians .The Puritans  had a Theocracy that resulted in persecution of Christians by Christians. One of my wife's ancestors was buried alive with stones in Salem . They also didn't tolerate Quakers or Baptists. Luckily there were no Catholics in the area because they would have been executed. The founders advocated separation of church and state for good reasons.

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I'm happy to post this quote again

"God made man in his image, man has been returning the favor ever since." Pascal

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Let it go
LesPhelps wrote:

If you argue that Diversity is not discrimination, like our country tries to teach us, then look up the definition of discrimination in the dictionary.

Les,

I've been subject to "reverse" discrimination as well - having been passed over due to gender or ethnic issues. In one particular case, feeling that I was better qualified for the position, yet not being chosen really stung. I harbored the resentment for years.

I watched one of those newsmagazine programs a while back (could have been a decade ago) where a white psychologist (or sociologist) was in front of a group of about 30 white people (both genders) and was talking about equal opportunity - particularly affirmative action. As you can imagine, the stories came out about reverse discrimination. After a few minutes of these stories, the crowd's inhibitions dissolved and a mob mentality was starting to form.

The psychologist asked the crowd how they would respond if they went in for a simple medical operation, only to have something unsuspected happen. When they awoke, they had become black. The crowd was already in an uproar and the general consensus was "sue the doctor for malpractice." He asked them how much they'd sue for and the responses varied from a few million to tens of millions.

Then, the psychologist asked them what economic harm there would be to them for suddenly becoming black ... if there were no discrimination? The crowd suddenly hushed. Then, the psychologist spoke about ingrained cultural issues that we recognize but don't want to admit to ourselves.

Obviously, for me to remember this, it had an impact on me. I could have easily been in that audience and I would have been at least as vocal. I was born a white male and have lived all my life as such. People don't have an automatic fear response when they see me (a white man) walking down the street. I don't fear that I will be raped by a stranger that is approaching from the other direction as a defenseless woman might.

Life ain't fair. Get over it. Everyone has advantages and disadvantages. Maximize the advantages and minimize the disadvantages. Harboring resentment will only reinforce the need for discrimination in your mind. You won't know how freeing it is until you let it go.

Wendy,

I know this is a long detour from your original post, but I'm glad this thread evolved the way it did. That the convenient foods disappeared from the shelves first makes sense. The mass of our culture has migrated toward sacrificing taste and nutrition for convenience. If/when societal breakdown occurs, the convenience items will disappear first. A box of mac & cheese will have higher trading value than a rutabaga.

Grover

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I agree with your assesment on education

AO

I recently retired form teaching High School mathematics and I can state without reservation that the overall quality of public education has declined. There is simply too much interference with the education process by the government  at all levels but particularly the Federal government. A whole litany of items comes to mind but I will mention only a few.

As far as curriculum we have "diversity training" requirements but no shop classes or welding technology. We have Latino  and Black studies  that impacts the ability to staff the core subjects because of budget issues. And don't get me started on the "Special Education" issue. It  makes me livid. When the expense to "educate" one student is $500,000 per year because he is special it certainly is not fair and just for the other "Non -Special" students.

The view that all students in high school should be preparing for college is ludicrous. Some students have no plans or interest in going to university but we insist that they take university prep courses. What happens when you try to force someone (especially a teen)  to do something they don't want to do?  More wasted resources by the central planners. Why not provide the services that are necessary for success instead of force feeding students what they don't want and can't use.

The bottom line is that we have too many bureaucrats trying to justify their existence by interfering in public education.

My grandchildren have now switched out of public schools and are being home schooled. I enjoy tutoring them in mathematics as well as other technical subjects.

 

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education

I agree, Ken.

I was an ESL teacher, teaching English to the new kids from other countries.  How long should that take?

We used to phase the students out after a few years as their skills improved.  Now there is a test that is harder than the grade level testing so that the students have to be better than the American kids to get out of that class.  That puts low performing kids who have been in the U.S. for say, 10 years, in the same class with the new students.  They get all the benefits of a special  student that doesn't know English when in fact the problem is more lack of motivation.

It was time for me to retire.

 

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There are other reasons for the shopping behavior...

Each person taking advantage of the going out of business sale, and ignoring money, will probably purchase 10% fresh foods and 90% 'evil' foods most of which last longer than most marriages.  This is a freshness issue in which we need to process fresh foods ASAP while the 'evil' foods can be stored in our pantries for years.  Therefore, on average, it actually makes sense that the 'evil' foods disappear from the shelves faster than the fresh foods...just saying...

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