where the jobs are and how to get one

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ao's picture
ao
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Posts: 2220
where the jobs are and how to get one

A very informative article in the Wall Street Journal on this subject. 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732449260457908704403360117...

Thanks to regulatory overload, Obamacare, etc., if memory serves me correctly, the temp industry has become the second biggest employer in the country.  My son in college worked for one this summer and usually worked 12 hours/day or more and as much as 18 hours a day on one occasion.  Pay was not high but overtime pay helped.  Work is not easy to find but it is out there for those with a good work ethic, even in our area which traditionally has a higher than average unemployment rate.  But why bother if you can make about as much from an entitlement program and not have to do hard or dirty work.  My daughter is working a 30 hour a week job and picking up some course work at the same time for graduate school.  With this non-temp job, the manager does not give any single employee more than 30 hours per week and instead of having them work longer hours, she sends the employees home who are getting near the critical number and calls another one in their place.  The whole picture of employment in America has changed dramatically in recent years and obviously not for the better.  The overall trend is that fewer and fewer hourly workers are working a 40 hour week while salaried workers are being asked to work significantly more than 40 hours but not receiving any more pay in compensation.  We've devolved from relatively high paying 40+ hour/week manufacturing sector jobs to jobs of 30 hours or less/week in the lower paying service and retail sector.  So much for the economic recovery.  Welcome to neofeudalism.     

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
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Posts: 1982
AO, this is exactly what

AO, this is exactly what happened in Canada when they got universal healthcare, under Trudeu. Now hte only people with full time jobs up there are in management.

John Lemieux's picture
John Lemieux
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Posts: 228
Exactly What Happened In Canada?

Wendy,

Pierre Trudeau did not enact Universal Health care in Canada.

Saskatchewan Premier (Social Democrat and former Baptist Minister) enacted the first health care act in that province in 1946. He is seen as the father of universal health care in Canada. 

Lester B. Pearson's 1966 Federal Liberal government would be the first to establish universal health care with all the provinces in Canada.    

http://medicare.ca/main/the-facts/the-history-of-medicare

And sorry, but I also don't believe your statement about there being no full time jobs outside of management in the Canadian healthcare sytstem. Can you provide a credible source to verify your statement?

 

Nervous Nelly's picture
Nervous Nelly
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Joined: Nov 23 2011
Posts: 209
Thanks John

This could easily become a universal healthcare system debate.  I actually like our system. It's more preventative. It's not the best but everybody is covered. There's a waiting time but you can actually afford to be sick. I can't imagine living in a society where I'm stressed out not knowing if I can afford my monthly health insurance costs or the probablity of having them rise because life threw me an unfortunate set of cards. I don't like the idea of kicking someone down even further in their time of need. 

I'm 54 and my doc said if all his clients were all like me he'd be out of business. So I'm never really sick but the few times I've been down and out with a flu, I felt really vulnerable. So I can imagine something more life threatening and changing. I 'd really hope to be supported at my weakest moment. Not being treated worst than a dog.

But the question now is can we still afford all this with the mass of baby boomers heading towards the greying years ? I doubt it. So we will see the system change and it won't put so much effort to keep the elders up and running.

NN

Doug's picture
Doug
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Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 3125
comparative systems

I get a little peaved hearing the right wing rail on and on about universal health care, its costs and its supposed lack of care.  There is really no doubt America's current system is the most expensive in the world:

 

Quote:

Health spending per capita, in $US PPP-adjusted, with the US and Canada compared amongst other first world nations.

Access to health care in Canada is universal, as it is in most nations with socialized medicine.  Here's a summary of our government's GAO report comparing Canada's and the US's healthcare systems:

http://archive.gao.gov/d20t9/144039.pdf

Quote:

If the universal coverage and single-payer features of the Canadian

system were applied in the United States, the savings in administrative

costs alone would be more than enough to finance insurance coverage

for the millions of Americans who are currently uninsured. There would

be enough left over to permit a reduction, or possibly even the elimination,

of copayments and deductibles, if that were deemed appropriate.

If the single payer also had the authority and responsibility to oversee

the system as a whole, as in Canada, it could potentially constrain the

growth in long-run health care costs. Measured either on a per capita

basis or as a share of gross national product, health care costs have

risen at a dramatically slower pace in Canada than in the United States.

The difference reflects Canada’s low administrative costs, controls on

hospital budgets and on the acquisition of high-technology equipment,

and fee controls for physician services.

Canadians have few problems with access to primary care services.

There are more physicians per person in Canada than in the United

States, and Canadians use more physician services per person than do

US. citizens. Yet the cost of physician services per person in Canada

was one-third less than in the United States.

The Canadian method of controlling hospital costs has limited the use of

expensive, high-technology diagnostic and surgical procedures. As a

result, waiting lists or queues have developed for some specialty care

services, such as cardiac bypass surgery, lens implants, and magnetic

resonance imaging. Emergency cases, however, are treated immediately,

bypassing the waiting lists.

A reformed U.S. system is not likely to look exactly like the Canadian

system, in part because the institutions that deliver and finance health

care in the two countries have evolved quite differently. But particular

elements of the Canadian system are worthy of consideration, including

universal access, a uniform payment system, and expenditure controls,

Obamacare is inadequate compared to Canada's system, but is a step along the way.  There's a reason the rest of the developed world has chosen socialized health care.  They would rather spend money on health care than a behemoth insurance industry that puts any bureaucracy to shame in terms of waste and obscene profits for those running the show.

Doug

westcoastjan's picture
westcoastjan
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 4 2012
Posts: 561
addtional link re our healthcare system

Here is a link the the federal government site that has covers pretty much anything a person would want to know about how our healthcare system works.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/index-eng.php

I can tell you that after a number of major surgeries over my lifetime, the most recent being this past January, I have received nothing but the best care. If fact after my surgery in January the nurses told me that there was no pressure for beds at that time and if I wanted to stay another day that was fine with them. Did not cost me a nickel. Are there waiting times in emergency rooms and for surgeries - sure there are. Show me a place where there aren't. Is our system broke? Sure is, just like everyone else's. But as NN says, at least we don't stress endlessly every month to pay premiums, or every time we need to get medical care. I can also say that many Canadians load up on out of country travel insurance when heading to the US, so fearful are we of being bankrupted by getting sick or heaven forbid require serious medical care in our neighboring country. Sad but true.

Wendy, when I first read your post I thought someone must have swiped your name and ID and used it to as it seemed to be very un-Wendylike?!? Especially making an allegation with nothing to back it up. It was almost weird...

Anyway, I am happy to stick with our less than perfect but also less stressful system.

Jan

westcoastjan's picture
westcoastjan
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 4 2012
Posts: 561
it would seem even tv gets in on the healtcare thing...

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/24/breaking-bad-canada-comic-health...

Nervous Nelly's picture
Nervous Nelly
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 23 2011
Posts: 209
Couldn't have said it any better Doug.

There are pros and cons in each system but the Canadian is humane.

Jan that's really funny. But it's true Breaking Bad could only happen in USA.

No such scenario could possibly even been imagined here.

NN

TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 13 2008
Posts: 366
Re: Breaking Bad in Canda

Not sure thats true, Sefan Molyneux (Freedomain Radio) had to travel to the US for cancer treatment. I believe it was because of the length waiting list for treatment. I believe he paid for his treatment in the US out of his own pocket. He has a several videos on YouTube about his cancer treatment.

 

TechGuy's picture
TechGuy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 13 2008
Posts: 366
Re:comparative systems

If you think its high back in 2007, you haven't seen nothing yet! Its going to double in 2014. The Gov't mandated insurance plans are bloated with a boatload of unecessary requirements and remove a bunch of necessaries that now require a secondary insurance to cover them (such as eye-care) 

ACA (Obamacare) isn't really universal medical coverage. Its mandatory insurance premiums for those with taxable income, and includes new taxes on medical services, medical devices and prescription drugs. What use to be tax free for patients now has taxes added. I believe the estimates for ACA will be a 170% increase for all healthcare premiums by 2016.There is no free coverage. The bare-bones plan costs about $175/mo (but varies depending on your age), and it does matter if you living below the poverty line. I believe the Barebones plan has a $3K or $5K deductable.

Since Healthcare in the US is about 16% of the GDP, ACA is going to have a big effect. The US economy is almost certainly heading head first into another really bad recession. Already we seen a big annoucment of layoffs. Yesterday, Merck Announced they are layoff 8500 employees, and many other medical companies are also going to start laying off soon.

 

 

 

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