Submit Your Q&A For Chris & Adam

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Adam Taggart's picture
Adam Taggart
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Submit Your Q&A For Chris & Adam

Every so often, we'll use our podcast as an open Q&A platform, where Chris and I address questions submitted by Peak Properity readers.

It's been a while since the last one and a few requests have come in recently for us to record a session like this -- so let's do this!

Ask your question in the Comments section below. 

Chris and I will sit down in a few days and do our best to go through as many of these as we can.

Ask away!

cheers,

A

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Belmontl
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Dry powder ready

Greetings

   There is always talk about having one's Wish list/buy list ready ...

I'm already fairly diversified....no debt, resiliency, gold, silver, crypto, treasuries,  New Harbor financial, commercial real estate...and cash

 

But what sectors (durables?) And other investment sectors?, local community ? 10 forms capital working on

https://www.metaintegral.com

Thanks 

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Geedard
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Disconnect of paper metals v real metal

If manipulated price of paper silver and gold will one day disconnect from price of physical silver and gold (fear driven by financial crisis or whatever)...how would we know it‘s disconnecting and by how much?

Who or what would report that?

Thanks in advance for the answer or a speculation.

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Morality vs pragmatism

Hi Adam & Chris. 

I’ve been struggling to answer this for myself for quite a while so I’m very glad you guys may take a swing at it.

So here it goes:

How do we move forward into a sustainably resilient life without harming the biosphere or causing harm to other fellow beings in the process? 

Seems a tall order no? 180 degrees from what humanity has  to varying amounts been doing for millennia. I can’t imagine that it looks at all like anything we are doing now? 

Some combination of simple tech, permaculture and living like folks did 200 years ago... that is a tough sell to just about everyone. I’m currently working on all the different forms of capital but it seems like I’m trying to extend the comfort of this unsustainable paradigm.  I guess it will answer itself over mine and my children’s lifetimes as we revert to the mean, but it would be nice to have a rough framework. 

 

Seb. 

 

 

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Brunel
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Peak expansion :)

How much further can Central Banks blow the credit bubble?

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nickbert
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Blockchain

My question:

Do you see the emergence of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies significantly changing the way governments and central banks will respond to the next major financial crisis?

Is it likely they attempt to ban independent cryptocurrencies? Introduce an international central-bank-implemented blockchain currency to take over the role of world reserve currency? Or something different altogether?

Thanks!

- Nick

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travissidelinger
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What Is A Sustainable Population

So here is the ultimate question, what would a sustainable human population look like?  Is it even possible?

First we probably need to define "sustainable".  There is the Webster definition.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sustainable

Specifically here I might suggest we mean "sustainable to 10,000 years".  Of course predicting things out that far can be problematic.  But if we think a process has a good chance of sustaining for 10,000 years, then it's probably splitting hairs whether it is actually plus or minus a few thousand years.

Here are some basic properties I would recommend:

* Sustainability must be a basic human right enforceable by counts that supersedes individual freedoms.

* Scientific consensus much be able legally trump non scientific consensus', or at least require that a practise is halted until more research is completed.

* The money system used should be based on a fixed resource, (such as gold), and fully transparent.

* All voting citizens must meet minimum education level standards.

* Successful members of the population must have a birth to death ratio greater then 1

* Unsuccessful members of the population must have a birth to death ratio less then 1

* All other human populations must maintain contained population levels, else their population must undergo forced population controls. (I don't think there is any way around this.  If another population grows larger and/or builds a military large enough to protect their non sustainable interests, then the sustainable system fails.)

 

So these are just some ideas.  What other ideas could I be missing?  I would love to see this topic debatted.  Is a sustainable human population even possible?   Or are we doomed to repeat growth and collapse cycles until the end of time.

-Travis

 

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Yoxa
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Definition, please
Quote:

 Successful members of the population must have a birth to death ratio greater then 1 ... Unsuccessful members of the population must have a birth to death ratio less then 1

The way many people would define "successful" these days is anything but sustainable so I assume that you'd have something different in mind. Please clarify what you'd mean by "successful".

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brushhog
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How about...

Best spots in the US to practice sustainble/self reliant lifestyle, and WHY?? Also WORST spots, and why?

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travissidelinger
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I would steer clear of any

I would steer clear of any hard definitions for successful an unsuccessful.  Those should only be guiding principles.  Examples where they would come into practise might be, say our taxation system.  Currently our taxation rules tax you less with the more children you have.  The inverse, for example, would require you pay more taxes for having more children, which would also infer that you are one of the more successful members of the population.  What if instead you get a tax break on the first child only, would that be a fair compromise?

As for the unsuccessful, I'm in favor of welfare, up to a point.  But, if 9 out of 10 heads in a room would say there is little to no possible positive future outcome for a giving situation, then why not let nature take it's course.  Why does our current culture find it so difficult to simply "let nature take its course"  It's not a bad thing.

Do we need to go as far as preventing the mentally ill or convicted felons from having children, and maybe even require that Nobel prise winters to have more children?  Nature and nurture are both important.  Maybe that convicted felon is now one wise cookie full of life sessions to share, and maybe that Nobel prise winner would be a crappy parent.  But on average, the input does have a significant effect on the output.  It use to be the norm that your parents had to okay the relationship before you were "married".  Maybe that idea was simply born out of practicality of the times.

Sorta related, but this week's This American LIfe has a story about mothers competing to have the most babies.  That story is a great example of how much this is a hot button topic.    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/668/the-long-fuse

Maybe all of this is just an artefact of pre-peak-oil and high surplus energy.  Once we return to living within our means, people simply won't have the resources to deal with this nonsense, and the simpler solutions will prevail.

 

-Travis

 

 

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Stabu
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Analysis on the Oil Situation & If Thorium Is Progressing

I'm wondering mainly two things:

1) When will the oil crisis hit badly enough to a) cause a recession and b) end business as usual? I presume that a) will be hit first followed by b) in relatively short order. The question I'm pondering myself is if b) follows a) within 1, 5, 10 or 20 years etc. I know several articles on this site (premium content at least) have made progrostinations around the years 2019-2022, but a more precice and detailed forecast would be appreciated - knowing that this is a very difficult, if not an impossible task.

2) What's the progress on Thorium? It's been a long while since this was last mentioned. Most development seems to happen in China followed by fairly minimal work in India, but I haven't heard anything of either in a while. I personally believe that succeeding with Thorium is maybe the only possibility mankind has to maintain high living standards (not to mix with living quality) without destorying everything through global warming or a set of other issues (pesticides, overfishing etc.) in the process.

 

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When the SHTF, who you gonna' call, Travis?

When problems are insurmountable, solutions may be incremental!

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Industrial colapse as a possible path to survival
 
It is clear to me that we are a de facto civilization of carbon fuel junkies, who have been handed a corporate civilization and oil powered lifestyle that that feels good, and is one that we will probably not willingly give up.
 
That means that if we are going to save ourselves, it will probably have to be through an inability to burn all the carbon that we collectively will demand. The one thing that looks like it could realistically do the job of curtailing our carbon consumption in time is an industrial collapse, like a deflationary spiral and world depression.

My question is to what degree could an involuntary contraction of the global economy save us from killing ourselves through global warming at this point. Does this pencil out as a plausible path to human survival?

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Bulk Production

Scanario

Lets suppose that societal collapse continues, speeds up and life for the average individual get very challenging.  With less resources, more challenges and stress the average individual will need about 3,000 calories a day to meet their needs.  That’s anywhere from a million calories a year to 1.5 or more a year. Supposing grocery store cheap abundance becomes more of a memory than a reality a discussion seems warranted on how and what to grow to help meet those needs. Not all vegetables, fruits and grains are equal, some like probably potatoes are better at sustaining life through bulk production.  What do you think would be a best choice for meeting peoples long term survival needs if supplementing them through gardening.

AKGrannyWGrit

 

 

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drbost
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"A world worth inheriting"

It's a great statement of PP's purpose..."To create a world worth inheriting".  What is your personal vision of what that world would look like?  What is the next step you will take to actualize that vision?

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macro2682
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Hyper-immersive vr...

Sounds crazy, but I could see how a hyper-imersive VR environment coupled with digital “assets” could help decouple resource consumption from economic growth.  That’s one possibility. 

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Montana Native
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Investing in stocks at some point?

Hey guys.......definitely made a lot of moves towards resilience in the last decade and much of that has to do with this site. Early this summer the wife and I (early 40's) are going to have our 12 acre homestead payed off after 9 years. It's consumed the vast majority of our income over that period. We've diversified the food forest to a great degree and continue to do so. Still have a purchased simple well to install and some kind of solar is on the wishlist along with a green house and the remainder of our fixed low rate student loans. I haven't listened to the real estate seminar yet, but the wife and I plan on doing that soon. Besides investment land/property at low prices, I'm wondering if there are any plays on dividend paying stocks out there......or are they dinosaurs? Played the market a bit in 2008-2009 in the PM segment and did ok, but rolled all that into long term physical that composes about 15% of our net worth. For the next likely runup in PM's I'm wondering if I might go the GLD or SLV route vs. individual stocks. Might start moving a small allocation into krypto too. Perhaps I'm not direct enough in my questioning, but I want to be relitively diverse without being too risky. Feel free to answer any point or the amalgamation of topics.

Thanks for all you do, TJ

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Chances of property rights failing

What are the chances that the collapse is severe enough that property rights become unenforceable.  Or that local "governments" ratchet up property taxes to the point of unaffordability to try and bleed the prepared dry before finally foreclosing on the property?

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macro2682
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Not a question...

I don’t have a question, but rather a request... can you set up some off-the-cuff podcasts with commentators that disagree with the neomalthusian ideas?  I would love to hear Chris debate some of the mainstream monetarists and keynsians. Most of the conversations I hear are between individuals already in agreement. 

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Michael_Rudmin
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if it will grow in your area, I'd say the purple yam.

What you want is a perennial that will feed you with minimal work.

So my list would include any of the following that are already in your area: purple yam, Jerusalem artichoke, kudzu, wheat, pigeons (dovecote), mulberry, blueberry, blackberry.

Then you can add high calorie potatoes, beets, brassicas.... but those aren't so perennial.

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Wayne Grow
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Hey AKG- I recently bought

Hey AKG-

I recently bought and highly suggest the book The Resilient Gardener by Carol Deppe as an answer to your question— caveat: the author is oriented toward the Pacific Northwest in terms of specific plant varietals but very much a 3E oriented book. Cheers

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mntnhousepermi
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I also recommend this book

Carol deepe, the resilient gardener. 

 

She, Carol Deepe,  is also right that winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes. 

I have grown all three, and harvesting sweet potatoes is the hardest as they break easier than regular potatoes and they need special treatment to cure them.  I did get an amazing number of sweet potatoe starts off of one purple sweet potatoe bought, organic, from teh health food store.  More than I could possibly use, but I had to start them very early, like now or last month indoors, and the ones that yielded were transpanted to pots indoors to get even bigger before being set out.

 

 

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Michael_Rudmin
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whoops, just saw the topic

my mistake. Just saw where this was posted. Same as the yam post above -- please ignore -- I saw this on the "all recent comments page", and did not see a header as to where it was posted. (deleted own text.)

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Yoxa
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Potatoes
Quote:

 winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes

A note from Irish history: the very work it takes to dig potatoes was one of the reasons they became such a dominant crop for the Irish. Ireland saw much fighting over the years, and root crops were less prone to destruction in war. It would be easy for your enemy to burn your grain fields; much harder to destroy your potato crop.

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mntnhousepermi
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Yoxa wrote: Quote:  winter
Yoxa wrote:
Quote:

 winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes

A note from Irish history: the very work it takes to dig potatoes was one of the reasons they became such a dominant crop for the Irish. Ireland saw much fighting over the years, and root crops were less prone to destruction in war. It would be easy for your enemy to burn your grain fields; much harder to destroy your potato crop.

 

For sure.  I like potatoes, and they stay safer from pests, insects and birds and rodents than many potential crops.  It is impossible to get tree nuts here, for example, without a full on war against squirrels, rats and birds take a toll on tree fruit, etc....  Potatoes are pretty safe.  And, I dont mid digging them out kind of like treasure hunting.  I much prefer digging regular potatoes vs. sweet potatoes.  The sweet potatoes are much more prne to breakage when trying to harvest.

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Euclid
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Banks and Solvency

If one is holding some cash most likely some of it is in a bank.Is there a rating service or some source one can use to check on how solvent a particular bank is.Not just the big national banks but smaller regional banks, and foreign banks.

 

Edwardelinski's picture
Edwardelinski
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Euclid

Bankrate.com is an easy source for the domestics.Fitch,Moody's and S&P.

 

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Geedard
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"....in exchange for..."

Hi Adam & Chris,

Please could you "discuss" this please... (in the Q&A or in an Off the Cuff session, doesn't matter which).

"...in exchange for...debt relief..."

I heard this in recent stories about Greece, but I think it will apply to every country worldwide in the future and is simply the central component of the elite/globalist plan.  In exchange for...debt relief.

Simply put - I believe the elite's plan is really very simple - namely, allow debt to explode everywhere to everyone, up to and beyond bursting point...then "let it go", then sweep up the debris and demand agreement (however reluctant for the recipients) to the globalist agenda "in exchange for...debt relief / debt rescue".

Along the way, the elitists line their pockets every which way and then "win" the game in the end. And that's it, as simple and uncomplicated as that.   All discussion about debt levels being insane is probably a waste of time, because it seems to be being done "by design" (at least in my eyes) to achieve an end purpose. A winning strategy so to speak.

So the question is: do you agree or what do you believe?

Many thanks in advance for discussing...   Kind regards, Andy

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Geedard
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One more thing
Geedard wrote:

Hi Adam & Chris,

Please could you "discuss" this please... (in the Q&A or in an Off the Cuff session, doesn't matter which).

"...in exchange for...debt relief..."

I heard this in recent stories about Greece, but I think it will apply to every country worldwide in the future and is simply the central component of the elite/globalist plan.  In exchange for...debt relief.

Simply put - I believe the elite's plan is really very simple - namely, allow debt to explode everywhere to everyone, up to and beyond bursting point...then "let it go", then sweep up the debris and demand agreement (however reluctant for the recipients) to the globalist agenda "in exchange for...debt relief / debt rescue".

Along the way, the elitists line their pockets every which way and then "win" the game in the end. And that's it, as simple and uncomplicated as that.   All discussion about debt levels being insane is probably a waste of time, because it seems to be being done "by design" (at least in my eyes) to achieve an end purpose. A winning strategy so to speak.

So the question is: do you agree or what do you believe?

Many thanks in advance for discussing...   Kind regards, Andy

As a PS to this thought...I think "they" are not yet "ready" to let it all go (perhaps the technology, crypto and AI is not yet ready to "keep and extend" control after bringing the global dog to heel with the debt for aligment exchange) - and this is why "they" manage the markets so intensively, to buy themselves time and skim the wealth along the way as a side bonus.

I think the main risk to the plan is an undesirable nuclear exchange where nobody wins - and this is why nations like Iran, N Korea (and Russia for that matter) plus other potential "rogue" nuclear nations receive such intense attention.     That said, I think that Russia and China are broadly "supportive of the big plan" and are just postioning themselves ready for a later time point.

And I also think that Dave Fairtex's recent "dark vision" of the fully intrusive world is absolutely spot on (if Amazon, Google et al continue on their current trajectory unhindered).

All in all, I think these are all just multiple and parallel components to eventually force an end game and "win" the globalist agenda. Sadly, mother nature might also have something to say ahead of all that. And if she does, then perhaps the population question will also be decided in the process.

Just thoughts...but I'd love to hear your views on all this...

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Eannao
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Real Estate - buy or rent?

I rent my home, but am considering buying. Should I wait to buy in the hope that the everything bubble will burst or should I buy on the basis that a deflationary bust may never happen, while inflation is virtually a certainty over the long term?

The central banks have shown their willingness to print at the slightest whiff of deflation (e.g 2016), so what is to say they won't continue to succeed with this until such point as rampant inflation arises? Why pay thousands in rent each year (a certainty) in the hope that RE prices will fall (a possibility)?

I know that Adam has chosen to rent while Chris has chosen to buy, so perhaps it's dependent on location and how overblown prices are in that particular location?

Insights appreciated.

 

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Doug
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bank rating

Here's Forbes' rating of the top 100 largest banks.  One I am very familiar with is in the top 10.  Although Forbes says these are the biggest banks, some are actually relatively small regional banks, serving rural and small town areas.  To me the management and fiscal rankings are more important than absolute size.  Check out Forbes' criteria.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2018/01/10/full-list-rankin...

Quote:

We ranked the banks based on 10 metrics related to growth, profitability, capital adequacy and asset quality. Metrics include return on average tangible equity, return on average assets, net interest margin, efficiency ratio and net charge-offs as a percent of total loans. Forbes also factored in nonperforming assets as a percent of assets, CET1 ratio, risk-based capital ratio and reserves as a percent of nonperforming assets. The final component is operating revenue growth.

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