Notes From The First-Ever PP Knowledge Capital Excursion

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Adam Taggart
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Notes From The First-Ever PP Knowledge Capital Excursion

Greetings from Pahrump, NV!

The 1st-ever Peak Prosperity Knowledge Capital Excursion is underway. Chris, myself and roughly 30 other PP members have convened in the desert outside Las Vegas to learn how to be more responsible firearm owners.

We're taking a 4-day defensive handgun class at Front Sight, a world-class firearm proficency and safety training facility.

Personally, I've learned a ton today, and there are still three days to go. I'm already *much* more relieved knowing that, with today's instruction alone, I have substantially more knowledge of how to use my handgun much more safely than I did beforehand.

And so far, it's been a blast going through all this with the PP crew. Live events like this are my favorite part of running this website -- our readers have such a unique and special blend of smarts, goodwill, humor and exceptionalism; I really can't imagine better people to spent my time with.

Below are a few photos I snapped today with my phone. I've invited the other folks with me to post some of theirs, too, as well as any commentary they'd like in the Comments section below. 

Hopefully those of you not here with us this weekend can have fun experiencing the event vicariously through these updates.

cheers,

A

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sunscreen

This is a very fun course and the organization is excellent.

But, this is the desert.  It is hot a blazes and i missed a few spots with the SPF 45 sun-block that I won't miss tomorrow.   The range time is broken up by lectures in the airconditioned hall.

Worn out, ready for bed.  Excited to be here and learning.

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desert survival

My desert survival course taught me the following:

Whenever possible, use clothing to cover skin rather than sunblock.  This was especially useful advice for me, since my burn time even when coated with sunblock 50 is about 30 minutes.

So that means floppy hats, scarves, long-sleeved (cotton) shirts, long pants, and (maybe) gloves.

Its about as anti-fashion as you can possibly get.  But I didn't get burned once when using this technique.

 

 

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Relaxing

Some of us still had enough energy to enjoy some good Mexican food and drink at the Silverton.

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Curtis Stone

Dave - I had to giggle at the image of you covered up in this fashion but it truly is the best.  Curtis Stone commented that during the summer he wears a large asian style hat and white shirt with collar and sleeves.  As little bare skin as possible.  Also, extra calcium is great as the excess vitamin D from sun exposure can deplete your calcium stores. Now I understand why I always craved ice cream after a day at the beach!    Have fun!

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Thorough instruction

The instructors here are fantastic.  They exude professionalism at every step of the training.  Their process is mentoring as much as instructing.  Safety is stressed in everything they do.  All their rules are illustrated with anecdotes about what has happened (elsewhere) when someone ignored one of the rules.  

We've learned about basic safety, proper technique, clearing malfunctions and lots more.  We've also had presentations on the legal, moral and ethical aspects of gun use.  They're mandatory for anyone who wants to go on to a concealed carry license.

We used a bit under 50 rounds the first day and about 150 today.  They tell us we'll use about 300 tomorrow.  

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Super glue for those bloody spots.

Many of you there have found the places your sidearms need a bit of smoothing. Super glue under your bandage will help. For those who hurt too much, switch to your off hand. Since it’s so new, your new neural pathways aren’t solid and switching hands won’t be much worse than day one. Cheers all. Have fun. Tycer. 

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Saving your family and other challenges

Today we each went through a session in the Front Sight tactical situation simulator.  We had to (individually) attempt to rescue family members who had been taken hostage by home invaders.  We needed to use tactical skills were shown yesterday.  It was a live fire situation (against wooden cutouts) in a specially constructed "home".  We got to use techniques for opening doors, clearing a room, etc.  Being first timers everyone made their share of mistakes, some more than others.  

We also did a lot more range practice, including clearing the three types of malfunctions.

Tomorrow is more range activities and skills testing.  They will test us in accuracy and speed.  We expect to consume another 200 rounds.

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Chris and his son Simon star

We developed lots of shooting skill and many great shooters were unearthed at Front Sight.

But Chris and his son Simon really stood out with perfect shooting scores on the test.

This was a very, very fun outing.  A great bunch of people. :-)

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The Front Sight group

I have to say this Front Sight experience exceeded all of my expectations by a wide margin.  Having been a shooter for a long time, but never having any training, I had a bunch of terrible habits to fix.  The staff was pitch-perfect in their corrections and suggestions.

I decided to give myself fully to the Front Sight process and techniques.  While still far from perfected (very far!) I am taking home a solid array of new things to test and refine.

The flow of the course, and the way it built to successively harder and harder elements was really masterful, including the way they slowly got us to considering actual shooting situations and practicing how we'd respond.

Like any good course, it was stressed over and over again that avoiding confrontation is, by far, the best course of action.  Next in line is practicing telling a possible threat to not advance or come any closer in a very loud, authoritative way.

But if it comes to having to shoot, then knowing exactly what to do and when and how is really important.  

In fact after taking this course I would say that everyone who ever thinks they want to carry a gun for personal protection SHOULD take this course.  Not the super weak "gun safety" course my own state requires which adds up to about 4 hours of talking.  Instead 4 days of comprehensive testing is really what's needed to get to basic proficiency.

If anyone does decide to come in the future my advice would be to only do this course and not try to weave in some Las Vegas too.  I was wiped out at the end of every day.  In a good way, but really cooked.

Here's the crew, including instructors.

And, yes, I was/am super proud of my son Simon who just practiced hard, listened carefully and really excelled earning the top "distinguished graduate" distinction.  Not an easy feat!    In terms of father-son time this was top-notch.  

While I didn't get nearly enough time interacting with PP members here, the schedule is really packed, I still feel like this was a very powerful bonding experience.  Something really intense was shared and that's what these PP 'experiences' are meant to accomplish.  Congratulations to everyone who came and made it through this rigorous course and experience!

(Now for my red eye flight home....)

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front sight 2010

I went through front sight a while ago - back in 2010.  I did the 4-day pistol course, 2-day rifle, and 2-day shotgun.  Unlike Chris, I'm simply terrible with a pistol.  At the end, they were kind and gave me a paper that more or less said, "this guy is really terrible with a pistol but he managed to avoid shooting himself or anyone else, so there's that."  I came away with the distinct impression that a pistol was just a malfunction waiting to happen.  I even had a type-1 malfunction happen to me in one of the drills!  Which I cleared, thank heavens; can't fault the training, it was excellent.

I didn't like the rifle either.  It was this light, finicky thing that I basically didn't trust by the end of the class.

Ah, but then there was the shotgun.  With the shotgun, I was flawless.  I never missed.  ("But, it's a shotgun" I hear you cry.  Yes, exactly.)  As in, really I hit every single time.  With the solid shot, and the buckshot, at 10 meters, and at 50, I always got to hear this rewarding noise from the iron targets.  Oh sure, my shoulder was sore by the time I was done, but my goodness.  Did I mention that I never missed?

I came away with a very clear appreciation for which weapon I would go for in any sort of trouble.

Blessed shotgun.  :)

 

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Great Time

Wow...what an experience....I am worn out.  Just now on the plane and able to get on the internet for the first time since this started.  Sand Puppy you were a great partner and showed great improvement throughout the course.  Dave you obviously remember this course pretty well...they definitely went through the malfunction drills enough that I now believe that most homeowners who rarely use a firearm would be better served with a revolver than the automatics we were using (but is nice to be able to fire 17 shots at one time).   Looking forward to the next experiential get together.  Thanks for organizing this event, it was an excellent value and very glad I came.  Doors closing so got to go.

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Love seeing this

I've been shooting for about 20 years now and I'm a HUGE proponent of training and learning how to be more proficient and safe with firearms. I've been taking classes over the last couple of years to get rid of bad shooting habits and learn more advanced techniques. Like a golf swing, you have to consistently practice to get better and you're never "done". There really isn't a better way to build confidence and dispel myths of firearms and gunfighting than to take pro courses like this, so I commend you all for investing the time, money and energy to do it. And remember: equal height, equal light, and stare down that front sight post like it owes you money! :)

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Police shootings

Some of the demonstrations gave me a much better understanding of the split second decisions police officers are faced with when confronting an armed individual.

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Shoot to wound, not kill

Some of the demonstrations gave me a much better understanding of the split second decisions police officers are faced with when confronting an armed individual.

And why it's ignorant and ridiculous to insist or even pass a law (as I've heard attempted) to legally require police to first shoot to wound a violent suspect (in the leg or the arm) BEFORE shooting center mass.  

https://www.ajc.com/news/national/here-why-police-don-shoot-wound-the-case-deadly-force/IV4ohtIm6r8FaEMj78u1bO/

Why not “shoot to wound” instead?

For a couple of reasons: First, shooting to wound someone may not stop the threat. If a person is shot in the leg, the threat may still exist as a suspect could still use his or her hands to fire a gun or stab with a knife.

Second, and most importantly, it takes a skilled marksman to hit someone exactly in the arm or leg, and, most officers are not skilled marskmen. In fact, outside of an old-fashioned TV Western, few people can make that shot, no matter the training. 

Dr. Bill Lewinski, executive director of the Force Science Institute, explained in a position paper for the Institute the physics involved in the notion of training officers – who are often running after suspects –  to “shoot to wound.”   

"Hands and arms can be the fastest-moving body parts,” Lewinski said. “For example, an average suspect can move his hand and forearm across his body to a 90-degree angle in 12/100 of a second. He can move his hand from his hip to shoulder height in 18/100 of a second.

"The average officer pulling the trigger as fast as he can on a Glock, one of the fastest- cycling semi-autos, requires 1/4 second to discharge each round.

"There is no way an officer can react, track, shoot and reliably hit a threatening suspect's forearm or a weapon in a suspect's hand in the time spans involved.”

David Klinger, a professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, put it another way speaking to ABC News  -- with officers trying to stop a threat to their life or the lives of others,  "Why would we want to injure or maim people?" he said. "It doesn't stop them." 

https://abcnews.go.com/US/police-trained-shoot-wound-experts/story?id=40402933

http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/activist-critical-of-police-undergoes-use-of-force-scenarios

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Wonderful Time

What a great group of people.  This was my first time hanging out with Peak Prosperity folks and I was truly impressed with the caliber of folks that showed up.  What a caring, heartful community that you have created a container for Adam and Chris!   The training was also high quality and I went from having little experience to now feeling that I have a skill level better than most.  Now if I can only figure out a simple way to post pictures here blush

 

Rob

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OK.  Great time had by the

OK.  Great time had by the crew (but that is always the case when PP folks gather...), great skill building, and great weather (hee hee..).  So when will this course be offered again?  Aloha, Steve.

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More pics

I uploaded more pictures to Adam's PP Google drive.

 

Aloha from Hawaii.

 

Rob

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Suspenders for the concealed carry in the (slightly) chubby

Having excess abdominal fat is a real drag for many reasons.  (Too bad that eating sweets is soothing to my anxious mood.)  You can't cinch your belt down tightly to support the weight of the weapon without an uncomfortable compression of abdominal fat and restricted breathing.  Miserable.

I discovered at Front Sight that regular suspenders get caught on the thumb of the weapon hand during presentation --at about picture 2 in the sequence below.  Not good for a smooth and rapid delivery from the holster.

Later I saw an elderly and very overweight man at Front Sight wearing *side suspenders* and a light bulb went off.  I just bought a pair.  They support the belt well without catching the thumb.  Attach the belt clips behind the holster, a bit farther back than this skinny model is wearing.

 

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More great training: Active Self Protection on YouTube

Are any of you familiar with this site?  Absolutely great training by video.  I’ve never disagreed with John’s tactical, legal, ethical, psychological, or spiritual insights about lethal self defense.  I watch them all as they come out.  If you own a gun and especially if you carry one on the street, I’d recommend the whole series to you as you have time.

 
Here’s a few examples:
 
 
 
 
 
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As a woman
thc0655 wrote:

Are any of you familiar with this site?  Absolutely great training by video.  I’ve never disagreed with John’s tactical, legal, ethical, psychological, or spiritual insights about lethal self defense.  I watch them all as they come out.  If you own a gun and especially if you carry one on the street, I’d recommend the whole series to you as you have time.

 
Here’s a few examples:
 
 
Hi PP members!  First post!  I wanted to thank you, thc0655 for sharing these videos.  It also was a pleasure to meet so many of you at this truly awesome training.  I wanted to comment as one of very few women at the course (in relation to men in terms of our members). 
I personally have lots of moral, tactical and practical digesting to do as I walk down the road to the LTC in my own home state and following this fantastic course at Front Sight.  It was a gem for me, and really opened my eyes to a whole new mindset as I strive to be a responsible gun owner and operator
 
   I have felt that while there are many things about self-defense with a firearm that are beneficial for a woman, (not being a law-enforcement officer like the woman in the above video) I would likely struggle with many of the ethical, moral, and emotional effects of actively using my firearm (i.e. I relocate problem insects instead of killing them!)  However, I absolutely have the "mother bear" instinct spoken of in the above clip, and would like to effectivelly protect those dear to me, if the need should arise. 
 
In all honesty, I would hope to never have need for such a skill vs people, however these challenging times make me feel otherwise unfortunately.
I'm curious about how some of the other PP members are working with these thoughts and ideas, and will continue to follow and read threads and posts. 
 
Last, I've found that due to carring a purse, wearing clothing that is not always condusive to LTC, as well as carring a firearm that is accurate, yet small enough for my hands and grip is on my list of things to think about.  Anyone have any advice and experience with that?  How are other women feeling about firearms, and their proficiency with them?
 
Be well all!
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Hi Evie

Hi Evie, I will share with you. If someone carries and they are regularly around children then they have to be hyper vigilient about firearm safety. A little carelessness can be tragic.  So I know women who selectively carry, sometimes choosing to have say, bear spray, wasp spray, dogs, tasers, or other deterrents handy.  Our family joke is an elderly dog we call 30 seconds as she will allow us that much time to escape a bear or whomever and get to a weapon.  Personally I know of several firearm accidents, no not accidents they were stupidity resulting in self wounding and the death of a child. On the comical side one was a distant relative by marriage of a guy who shot himself in the leg. A hysterical wife called 911 and the swat team showed up traumatizing the whole family.  Apparently the message that the wound was self inflicted wasn’t clear.

Personally I feel safer knowing that there are a lot of people who carry up here in Alaska.  It’s not just criminals who have guns it’s practically every hunter, fisherman and out-doors loving adventurer.  Question - do you really need to every day carry?  I think selective carry is wiser as people are then less complacent.  

My 2 cents

 

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Cornered Cat
EvieB wrote:
   I have felt that while there are many things about self-defense with a firearm that are beneficial for a woman, (not being a law-enforcement officer like the woman in the above video) I would likely struggle with many of the ethical, moral, and emotional effects of actively using my firearm (i.e. I relocate problem insects instead of killing them!)  However, I absolutely have the "mother bear" instinct spoken of in the above clip, and would like to effectivelly protect those dear to me, if the need should arise. 
 
In all honesty, I would hope to never have need for such a skill vs people, however these challenging times make me feel otherwise unfortunately.
I'm curious about how some of the other PP members are working with these thoughts and ideas, and will continue to follow and read threads and posts. 
 
Last, I've found that due to carring a purse, wearing clothing that is not always condusive to LTC, as well as carring a firearm that is accurate, yet small enough for my hands and grip is on my list of things to think about.  Anyone have any advice and experience with that?  How are other women feeling about firearms, and their proficiency with them?
 
Be well all!

Hi Evie,

www.corneredcat.com Kathy Jackson made this website just for you. Go to articles.

It is my opinion that you should go rent as many weapons as you can at a gun range while paying for a couple of hours of extra training. Kathy Jackson will help you choose the size to fit your needs, keeping in mind that smaller guns are much harder to shoot and clear. One exception to this might be the sigsauer p238. It is exceptionally easy to manipulate for a small gun.

 

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AKGrannyWGrit wrote:I think
AKGrannyWGrit wrote:

I think selective carry is wiser as people are then less complacent. 

I respectfully disagree. 

 If every time you handle your weapon you handle it slowly in the manner in which you would draw it or holster it(the reverse of the draw) in an emergency situation you will never become complacent. Handle it exactly the same every time no matter what your purpose of handling it. Slowly and with purpose. In an emergency your mind and body will absolutely speed this motion up to meet the need. 

There are are no accidental discharges, only negligent ones where one or more of the five simple rules were not strictly adhered to.

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Four rules

The Front Sight folks teach 4 rules:

1 Treat all guns as if they are loaded.

2 Never let your muzzle cover anything you aren't willing to destroy

3 Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot

4 Be sure of your target AND what is in line with it

Every neglegent discharge they described in the lectures violated one or (usually) more of these rules.

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Perhaps

Tyler, in a perfect world with concentious, thoughtful people I would whole heartedly agree with you but let’s take a look at this from a different perspective.  A Dentist tells a person you need to floss daily and so they floss for several days in a row and oops they overslept, were running late, got distracted, twisted their ankle or any of a 100 other reasons to explain why their best intentions got interrupted.  People get complacent not to mention lazy. Second, I know a couple of very intelligent, successful people who shot themselves, unintentionally,  My point is people get careless, distracted and complacent.  Plus, some people can barely chew gum and walk at the same time and there is no law that says only smart people can every day carry.  So, promoting “selective” carry might not be a bad idea!

AKGrannyWGrit

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Doh! Yes 4. The fifth is my

Doh! Yes 4. The fifth is my personal. 5. Only touch in one manner

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On Training and Negligence

I'm copying this over from the preparedness blog post area, because it belongs in this discussion as much as over there.

++++++++++++

Barnbuilder wrote:

Just posted a link to an After Action Review (AAR) by an AMRRON ham operator who also resides in Wilmington, NC  as your family member does.  Despite being more preparedness minded than 95% percent of citizens he still had some lessons learned that those interested may find useful.

https://www.peakprosperity.com/discussion/114389/ham-radio-and-hurricane...

That was a fun read.  A bit jargony for me, a non Ham Operator, but I loved the sense of agreed procedures and dedication that came through.

These two bullet points caught my attention:

  • I've tested my generator during Hurricane Matthew and we only lost power for 23 hours. I was not prepared for a multi week long grid down scenario. Once we loaded the generator fuel went a lot faster than I had thought. We did not have enough fuel on hand and we had to find it. This hindered other duties where I could’ve been of more service.
  • It's been many years since I've been put in high stress, long duration, situations and with a houseful of family members. I didn't anticipate the emotional toil and disruption of schedule it would take on everyone and this wore me out physically, mentally and emotionally. We also need to implement a schedule beforehand with assigned duties. It took a huge toll on me when I had to direct everything in real time.

The first learning is that you have to be prepared for the scenarios that unfolds.  Since it's impossible to prepare for everything, you have to pick your level of preparedness comfort.  

It takes energy to source, maintain and replace your prep gear and supplies.  It also takes a toll to be short a critical item at a needed time.

I think all one can reasonably hope to do is prep as best you can, learn from other's mistakes, and try to keep the easy basic errors to a minimum.  I know I've left batteries in electronics only to be severely disappointed later on when they've leaked and destroyed the items.  That's an easy mistake to avoid.

Much the same as in handgun training, where there are no accidental shootings only negligent discharges, poor preparedness practices will lead to predictably poor outcomes.  Either the gun was loaded when you thought it wasn't or your finger was on the trigger when it shouldn't have been (or both).  Proper training on robust procedures will correct that.

For instance, at Front sight, when the range instructor yelled "UNLOAD!!" everyone on the line performed these steps:

  1. With the muzzle safely down range, gun at the ready (45 degree angle at the ground), your finger is straight to the side on a known reference point on the side of the barrel
  2. A chamber check is performed (slight slide of the barrel to visually check for brass in the chamber
  3. The magazine is released and put in your mag holster (or a support side pocket if mag holster is full)
  4. The slide is racked and the ejected shell is caught and put in a support side pocket 
  5. The chamber is visually checked again
  6. The mag well is checked by insertion of a finger to assure nothing is in there
  7. If the chamber is empty and the mag well check comes up empty, the gun is either decocked or placed on safe depending on the gun (glocks get neither as they have a safety trigger)
  8. The gun is holstered slowly and carefully using the exact same movements as you would after a gun battle.

I've been shooting long enough to be competent, but I never had a detailed procedure for unloading.  Now that I do, I'm using it every time.  The chance of my gun accidentally being loaded when I think it's empty has dropped to very, very close to zero.  I would say zero, but you can't really ever say that, but as long as this procedure is followed every single time, the gun will always be unloaded. 

The danger comes in me being sloppy, and forgetting to do these steps which, if that happens, I will now consider to be a matter of negligence, not accident.

A more subtle point, also made by Tycer in the Front Sight thread, is that in a crisis (or gun battle) your training is everything.  If you are lucky (according to our range instructor) roughly 50% of what you trained up to will be used in that moment.  Meaning about half of what you learned will go right out the window.

How good is your other 50%?  That's the point of always reholstering your weapon the exact same way, always loading and unloading the exact same way, etc.  It's to cement these basic building blocks to the point that they are retained and used because those are the only way you do these things.  There is no bin of available methods and practices to rummage through.  

If people really want to become prepared they have to practice on their preps.  Period.  First to cement the procedures into place, and second to find out where the weak points are.  I know I need to do a lot more of this myself, and that's what the PP skills events/experiences are designed to do.

As to the second bullet point above, a really important point was made that the mental and emotional toll was far higher than anticipated by the author.  It's important to know this going in, and to learn ways of managing stress and being able to self-soothe and reset your internal body responses at will.  Those who can do this best will fare the best.  Emotional resilience is perhaps the most critical. 

During training, the Navy Seals (and other branch operators) for example put themselves into extremely high stress situations to push their minds and their bodies to the very edge and then operate from there.

I live a super comfortable life.  I keep stress out of it as much as possible.  I have a nagging fear that I will be unpleasantly surprised by how I operate under sustained stress and lack of proper sleep, nutrition, or down time.  Honestly, I am probably best prepared for what we might call a 'gentleman's crisis.'  

Again, this is where the PP skills series comes in.  For those that want to up their game, and find out the areas where they can "pre-adapt" rather than on the fly, we'll be delighted to arrange and then share in those experiences as equal and eager participants.

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Really Liked the Cornered Cat book too.

Kathy Jackson, with her website and book, is a very articulate spokes person for women transitioning to being armed in everyday life.

She briefly mentiones that she had "an incident" earlier in her life and "resolved that she would never be in a powerless position again."  She decided to carry regularly.

Yet she is also a caring person, and a product of our civilization that abhors violence and the paraphernalia associated with violence (like guns, knives and symbols).  Yet she also came to understand that the value of protecting the innocent, including protecting her own innocence, demanded that she embrace a capacity for violence herself.  She did so very consciously and thoughtfully.  And skillfully.

In Spiral Dynamic terms, I would say she explains a transition from GREEN Meme type of "kindness" to a more complex and accurate YELLOW Meme "kindness" that understands force is required against the small but very damaging sociopathic elements that prey upon the vulnerable when an opportunity presents.

She explains a number of situations where being armed allowed her as a single mother to care for herself and children with confidence not possible to a powerless unarmed single woman with a child.  In one, her car broke down on a rural road and she had to decide whether to accept a ride back to town from an unknown man who stopped his pickup truck.  She accepted and was completely safe as the man turned out to be kind and respectful.  But she violated a cardinal rule of the powerless, isolated, single woman:  Never get into a car with a strange man.

A very thoughtful book.  Many logistical issues of clothing and when not to carry.  (doctors office, post office, airports).  Also, how to hide ones weapon when church friends hug you--one handed hug, turned slightly to the side, hold an arm or bible over the weapon.) 

Who should you tell you are carrying?  Absolutely, no one.  They will ALL have their thoughts and opinions and want to shape your behaviors to their values and beliefs.  It is private.  Like the color of you underwear.  It is private.  Period.  Don't talk about it.

With children in the home.  The weapon is on your body in its holster or in the bedside safe.  Never, ever any other location.

This book was very good for me.

Aaron M's picture
Aaron M
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2373
Training

Great job taking that “first step”!

Front Sight was the first professional, non-military shooting curriculum I ever attended, which woke me up to the need to do more skill building under guidance.

As you all move forward, learning to use the basics built there will serve you well, but there’s quite a bit of hyperbole tied up in FS’s presentations. 

Their promise of being better than 95% of people who carry a gun for a living, for example. This promise lacks context, and isn’t relevant. It gives you some items from the “do” list, but none of the perspectives from the “don’t” list.

Marksmanship is probably 10% of the bigger picture, with the vast majority being intellectual (awareness, tactics, interpersonal communication skills - roughly 50%), with another 25% being bodily kinesthetic (physical fitness, physiological familiarity with the weapon). The remaining 15% is mental calm and nerve, which has to be reinforced through more advanced training, such as force on force or martial arts. Violence is the ultimate competitive sport, and as such, mindset and strength of will is important. This can’t be learned on the range.

Further, courses like this simply cannot introduce concepts to the students that force them into realistic decision trees. For example, what happens if shooting starts while you’re holding a child? What if you’re injured? What happens if you challenge a perp and they comply? Can you work your handgun while operating a disparate task with your support side hand?

How we understand violence is important, too. What’s applicable for a Navy SEAL probably isn’t relevant to an armed citizen, and often as not, their experiences with violence will be totally different.

The ultimate message here is that guns are about life and death. Similar to medicine, if you take up the art, you may quit, but you’ll never finish. 

This curriculum is the “pre-reqs”. You have some habits now that if maintained will help facilitate greater skill building. The next step is learning to use them in context. I’m always available if anyone would like to discuss this more in depth.

I fully expect no one wants to hear this right now, but I promise... you’ll circle back to it if you stick with self defense training. 

Cheers,

Aaron

[email protected]

 

Bleep's picture
Bleep
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 8 2017
Posts: 17
Membership

Is anyone else considering the membership offer from FTA?  I am thinking about it but would be more interested if lots of PP folks are doing it.  The training was awesome, but hanging out with all of the PP folks made it even more than awesome.  What a great bunch of heartful, intelligent folks!  It would be cool to return with other Peak Prosperity folks some day.     My wife was in China during the training and my biggest disappointment was that she couldn't come along, learn the skills, and meet all of you.  sad

By the way, she is at her parent's place in China helping harvest crops.  They have been practicing small scale sustainable farming since the 80s and heating their food with biogas made from livestock manure since that time.   Except for a trickle of electricity they have always lived off grid.  They get incredible yields from just about 2.5 acres in North Central China - not that long of a growing season.  Nothing is ever wasted.  Every animals' poop, including humans, gets used in one way or another.  I  have never met anyone who works harder or is happier than her father.  

Meeting all of you really got a fire burning under me and me and a friend are starting to build a chicken coop next week and also starting to plant more of our one acre with fruit trees and veggies.  Right now we just have about 15 fruit trees and a small veg garden.  The papayas are coming off like crazy right now.  Harvesting 3-4/week.  

 

Rob in HI

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