Incoming..........

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thatchmo's picture
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Incoming..........

Whew..........While having breakfast with my ham radio buddy an hour and a half ago, the County of Kauai issued, via Connect 5 on my cell phone, an emergency alert message to the tune of "Incoming ballistic missile threat.  Stay indoors, this is not a drill".  This was not accompanied by a siren, but I high-tailed it back north to home, 16 miles away.  Took approximately 25 minutes or so- just as I walked in my front door- for the County to announce that it was a false alert and they're investigating....I hugged my sweetheart very tightly.....As soon as the adrenaline wears off,  I'm reviewing my preparedness plans.  Peace, Aloha, Steve.

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Missile Scare

Steve, that was definitely a heart racer I bet.

Trolling through a Reddit thread I came across these typical responses:

 

 

 


(Source - Reddit)

The general themes were that people were legitimately and correctly freaked out, and also unprepared.

Mentally and physically.

I would have probably gone into "high activity mode" which is just one level shy of useless anxiety-driven random actions.  Just being honest here.  :)

Luckily I have thought all this through, and purchased my nuclear readiness materials a few years back.
Here are a few of the most relevant links:

 

My personal preparations for nuclear war

 

Fukushima's Legacy: Understanding the Difference Between Nuclear Radiation & Contamination

 

The Contamination Threat

 

Good luck with your renewed preparations Steve!

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Re: Scare

So what scandal was swept under the rug and/or unconstitutional law was passed while everyone was occupied by this?

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This false alarm will wake some people up
As a result of this, some people will be awakened from slumber and start making some realistic preparations. Some may even start reading PeakProsperity.com!  Unfortunately, most people will roll over and go back to sleep.  Just human nature.  I suppose a Darwinist would say that those who don't take reasonable precautions are marked by Nature for extinction.  We see the exact same dynamic in regard to the coming economic and environmental disasters. I wonder how The Collapse will effect our DNA...
 
Steve, think about your plans for this kind of thing when you're away from home.  I believe the flight time for an ICBM from North Korea to Hawaii will be less than 20 minutes, and any warning you MIGHT get will be significantly less than that UNDER THE BEST OF CONDITIONS. You would've been caught out in the open for the "event" and would've been killed in a scenario in which survival was quite possible for those who were sheltered at the moment of detonation.  "Military intelligence" and politicians being what they are I believe it would be highly likely that you would get NO WARNING.  That would make sense: send a warning when there is no threat, and dither around and not send any warning when the threat is real.  Seems to me like something like that happened in Hawaii before...  If this were a sane and rational world, it would seem to me that Hawaiians would have it in their genetics to be prepared for surprise attacks and skeptical about getting any help from the military or politicians in that regard.  You may have gotten all the warnings you're going to get.  Same for the rest of us
 
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You never forget the first time...

...your parents load you into the storm drain because they fear an incoming missile.

Source = https://gfycat.com/unsungdamageddwarfrabbit

 

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Kids in storm drain to avoid nuclear blast

I am assuming that the act of putting the kid in the storm drain stemmed from great fear and great love for this child.  Very sad to imagine the family's fear and distress that would make this seem reasonable.  :-(

Will the child emerge after the blast to have food and water and living family?

I wonder what the hell happened with this launch alert. 

Stupid stupid stupid mistake?  Hold my beer and watch me do something really crazy?  Hack of the broadcast system by someone who wanted to let someone know that they could?  A real blip on a screen that someone (or some machine) briefly thought might actually be a launch?

 

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Incoming: Classic Black Swan

Have we all just been shown what a real Black Swan looks like?

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I SAID LUNCH

Aloha! On the Big Island! No sirens and no text! I looked up in the sky looking for the nukes going by on the way to LA and Washington DC and NYC! As if any "real" evil mastermind would launch one at a time!

This was a wake up call for more than just Hawaii. It showed the complete lack or desire of government to carry out their one and only main responsibility which is to protect the US citizens! Job #1! This demonstrated the difference between the 1960s Cuban crisis mentality and the current mentality of "re-election first - citizens second"! In the 1960s we had school drills and field trips to official Civil Defense buildings complete with what to do and where to go in the building. Now nobody knows what a CD sign looks like!

While we had Dr Strangelove repopulation debates of 26 Playboy models to every Army general! We also had a government that encouraged self preservation and many of us built bomb shelters in back yards. Now there is no government encouragement to protect yourself and your family. But Ige, governor, was found at the Diamond Head bunker. Government now only protects its own whether there is a nuke alert or not!

Maybe immigration will take a back seat to the needs and the protection of US citizens first! But I doubt the deep state media will allow for that! The re-education centers called public schools have stripped us any basic survival skills. Not because that wasn't planned ... it was! This is a dangerous game the deep state is playing, but when any entity assumes the high moral pedestal human nature historically always dictates a fall is imminent!

JFK did not pass the buck on the Cuban Missile Crisis to LBJ. He ended it on his watch. Maybe because he was fresh off PT 109! The Clinton, Bush and Obama Dynasty could have learned a lesson from JFK!

Here in Hawaii I await the liberal democrat government to announce their new "get tuff" policy on any future nuclear threats by declaring the entire state a NUCLEAR FREE ZONE! The long slow descent into insatiable apathy and cognitive ruin continues! Carry on bravely!

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Time for a Raise

and a promotion to shift commander, perhaps.

Ige and the head of Hawaii's Emergency Management agency, Vern Miyagi, said the false alert was the result of human error — and boiled down to a state emergency management employee clicking the wrong message during a routine drill that happens three times a day during shift changes.

"We did make the determination that it was a false alarm. The alarm was sent out in error, and we know that the procedure in a shift change had been followed, and a human error sent out the false alarm," Ige told Hawaii News Now.

"We then went through our process to correct that and send out a notification that the alert was in error."

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/37259684/ballistic-missile-threat-ale...

Hopefully, the "process" for correction (as in taking several minutes) didn't require someone to read through an online version of the "procedure manual" to determine what to do in case of "human error" or something like stealth seagulls showing up on radar.

I suppose it could also have been something akin to "Pepsi Syndrome" (you'll have to look that one up).

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The day after.....

Well, comments on inept govt response not withstanding, I'm taking this incident as an example of what can, and will, happen with complex systems- Shit happens.  Apparently this warning system is tested at every shift change- 3 times a day, 24/7/365.  When pestered by reporters to "tell us who screwed up", at least Vern Miyagi looked them square in the eye and said "I'm responsible for this".  Guy's got stones.  Getting your knickers in a wad because the government has thrown you a curve ball- REALLY??  Come on folks, we all agree we have to take care of our own business and safety.  I'm using this event to bolster my preps and procedures.  

My personal take away:

Ballistic Missile False Alarm after-action report January 13, 2018

Situation:  0810 hrs.  Having breakfast at restaurant with friend.  One block from workplace.  16 miles from home and family.  Received “official” notification on cell phone: "BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII.  SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.  THIS IS NOT A DRILL.".  Siren warnings from local sirens not heard.  Spent about 3 minutes discussing with friend, and listening to local comments on ham radio VHF repeaters.  Decided to head back home to be with family.  Traffic not too heavy, but could tell that some folks were in a hurry and others were traveling at normal speeds.  Speeds up to 70 mph except when encountering other traffic, then down to 50 or so.  Not safe to pass, 2-lane highway…Got home in about 15 minutes, just as local radio station announced the false alarm.  Partner, who doesn’t use cell phone, was unaware of any alert- nothing had come over the landline.  Neighborhood calm.  HIEMA reports human error caused false alarm.

Thoughts:

          “Official” alert, yet no sirens, which would be expected.  Respond, or ignore?

          An actual attack warning would probably allow maximum of 15-20 minutes to prepare.  Attempting to travel home would have possibly exposed me to blast danger.

          Don’t have a designated or secure place in town to shelter, that is hardened for nuclear blast effects, or survival equipped.  Cinder block convenience store across street would have probably been best shelter.

          I spend more of my waking hours in town, yet almost all of my preps are at home.  Need to expand prep availability. 

        Things at a "public" level were already iffy as the only highway between the business/commercial center and the population center of the island had been closed since ~0600 due to major car accident. 

Live and learn folks.  Low-probability/High Impact event.  Prep accordingly.  Wish I could have finished that avocado omelet though....;^)   Aloha, Steve.

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Surprise

My cynical self is totally surprised that the government even has a plan in place to attempt to warn the citizens of impending nuclear destruction. I have long assumed that, unlike the 1950's and 60's, when civil defense was a constant topic of official discussion, the present ruling class was planning to let us be vaporized without warning, never knowing what was happening to us.

JT

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I had just gotten rid of my

I had just gotten rid of my metal garbage can I was going to use as a Faraday Cage due to the space it was taking up. Maybe I should rethink that.

One thing you might want to do is get an old car. The old Land Cruisers are advertised as EMP resistant due to the lack of electronics. The freeways won't be cluttered since most cars would be dead. But driving will make you a moving target in a big city.

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Some warning systems do work in timely manner....

I just got back from a week in the yucatan. While sitting together one evening, my husband and I felt three distinct tremors right after each other. We looked at each other and said "earthquake". Since I live in Santa Rosa, I am no stranger to earthquakes, and this felt to be similar to a 3.0. But, we also knew this could be a much larger earthquake, just farther away. Since we were staying near the beach we were concerned about a tsunami. Within five minutes or so of feeling this earthquake: 1) the USGS earthquake website listed this as a 7.8 magnitude quake just off the coast of Honduras, approximately 350 miles south of us. 2) The Tsunami warning website issued an alert for a tsunami wave of 0.1-1 meter in height. Since we were about 1/2 mile from the beach at an elevation of 24 feet, we had not worries. But, if we were staying right on the beach and the wave was 3 meters high....well we would have had approximately 20-30 minutes to head to higher ground. Just knowing that information in a timely manner helped me enormously. Of course, it did not preclude another large earthquake happening right in on our location (as I noticed a 7.6 earthquake happened in Costa Rica a few minutes after the 7.8 quake in Honduras) that could have crushed us in our sleep if the casa collapsed. Some things you just cannot outrun. And I decided to embrace the uncertainty and enjoy myself (and the beach and snorkeling and the tacos) despite some random thoughts about a larger aftershock creating a more dangerous tsunami. Afterwards we marveled at the efficiency of those website postings, and the fact we even had a worldwide network (and the ability to access it freely). Thankfully there were no reports of widespread damage or loss of life in honduras.

 

But my larger point, is for every screw up, we should acknowledge that thousands of important, accurate data points are being gathered in the background that benefit us. It is not all bad news. 

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Embrace the suck

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/timothymeads/2018/01/13/for-the-love-of-the-game-hawaiian-man-spends-potentially-last-moments-on-earth-golfing-n2434233

"Golf is a good walk spoiled," American author Mark Twain is credited as saying. Golf, a game as beautiful as it is frustrating, is played daily by thousands of men and women. Time and time again, a good golf round is ruined by slow play, a call from a spouse demanding their loved one home, or inclement weather. But for one Hawaiian man, absolutely nothing could get in the way of finishing his round, not even a potential ballistic missile strike.

Greendoc wrote:

But my larger point, is for every screw up, we should acknowledge that thousands of important, accurate data points are being gathered in the background that benefit us. It is not all bad news. 

Exactly.  And I suppose that's why we're all here (and a bunch of other internet sites).  Plenty of warnings are being sounded, but the sad thing is most people aren't paying attention to the warnings or are not taking appropriate action regarding them.  See CM's post this morning.

It's always been this way and always will be.  It's "a human nature thing."  There were even warnings about Pearl Harbor too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassandra

Cassandra or Kassandra (Ancient Greek: Κασσάνδρα, pronounced [kas̚sándra], also Κασάνδρα), also known as Alexandra, was a daughter of King Priam and of Queen Hecuba of Troy in Greek mythology.

Cassandra was cursed to speak true prophecies that no one believed. A common version of her story relates how, in an effort to seduce her, Apollo gave her the power of prophecy: when she refused him, he spat into her mouth to inflict a curse that nobody would ever believe her prophecies. Another version has her fall asleep in a temple, where snakes licked (or whispered in) her ears so that she could hear the future.[a]

Cassandra became a figure of epic tradition and of tragedy.

In modern usage her name is employed as a rhetorical device to indicate someone whose accurate prophecies are not believed by those around them.

 

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Time2help wrote: So what
Time2help wrote:

So what scandal was swept under the rug 

The uranium-to-Russia scandal headlines got knocked off the front page by this.

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The view from Maui

Hey gang --

The civil defense alert chased me out of bed just after 8 on Saturday.  We have a grandma and a best friend visiting from the Mainland, and they are happy to provide early morning care to my 1-year-old son, so I was hoping to take advantage of the chance to sleep in.  No such luck.

I did the mental math -- we're on Maui, a nuke is going to Honolulu/Pearl Harbor.  We would probably lose electric and water service, but beyond that, esp with the wind blowing the other way nearly all the time (no fallout threat), we'd be "okay".  So I went in and sat with my sleeping son (down for his morning nap) for a few minutes, then went and made coffee and a nice breakfast (can't face the apocalypse with an empty stomach).

Our preps are all up to snuff (although if we were suddenly feeding 5 instead of 3 for an extended period, our food supplies were shorter than we had planned for), so there wasn't much to do.  There's nearly zilch in the way of civil defense shelters on this island (Honolulu has much more of this infrastructure), and underground spaces period are rare (volcanic rock like ours is notoriously rotten for these purposes).

So, we stayed indoors, posted messages of love and peace to our friends and family, and waited.  It was surprisingly okay.  A good chance to do a self check:  if this is it, how'd I do.  Turns out I feel pretty good about things.  

A friend back East does a daily news-digest email called The Chaos Report.  He's former CNN (don't hold that against him <smile>).  He asked me for my thoughts on the whole deal.  Here's what I wrote (and he published this morning).

Quote:

"Being awoken with a cell phone warning of an imminent ballistic missile attack sure as hell shifts your frame of reference in a big hurry. Everything extraneous falls away. If you can avoid falling into panic, you will immediately understand what in this life really matters to you. And if, on a deep level, you feel as if you’ve lived your life well, you may not even be afraid. My primary emotion was gratitude for my life, tinged with sadness that there wasn’t going to be more of it.

In my opinion, this was no fat finger accident. It was a deliberate and cynical experiment. A trial balloon opinion poll, in real time and real life, about the prospect of a limited nuclear exchange.
 
People running this country, both on the right and the left, and the entrenched bureaucracy, have in my opinion completely lost touch with reality.
 
When you’re legitimately focus grouping nuclear war, you should step down and check yourself into a mental institution.
 
As I write this, I’m sitting in a beach park on Maui. I’m surrounded by family and friends, my son is 4 feet away and his vegetarian grandma is feeding him his first taste of Kalua pork. Soon we will break out our instruments and play some music and sing some karaoke. When the sun gets low we’ll get in the water for an end of day swim.
 
Seems like in the aftermath of our existential excursion, we’re all keen on the richness of simple pleasures. People who find that trite or twee? I respectfully suggest you’ve lost sight of what life is about.
 
As for the cynical power-seeking maniacs currently running this country into the ground, history will rightfully bury you side by side with the other criminals of this era.
 
Please do try to not exterminate all of us as you vie for your self aggrandizement."

 

Five families have responded in the affirmative to my offer on FB to help them plan their preps.  So, something good actually is coming from this awful mess.  And a heightened appreciation for the richness of my life is a fine thing, too.

Carpe the f*&^ing diem, y'all!

VIVA -- Sager

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Australia is ready — NOT

Here in what used to be the Land of the Long Weekend, various authorities are beginning to wake up and realise that we're not prepared for anything along the lines of civil defence.

Defence analyst Malcolm Davis told The New Daily that although Australia had an emergency alert system for natural disasters, there was a “functional gap when it comes to high-level military threats”. That “missing link” in the chain of communications could hamper the ability of authorities to quickly warn the nation of an incoming missile attack, he said.

Under the constitution, states and territories are responsible for the protection of life and property, including emergency management.

Dr Davis, Senior Analyst in Defence Strategy and Capability at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said the Australian Headquarters Joint Operations Command at Bungendore would receive “communication from the Americans that the missile was on its way” in the case of an attack.

There was already a system of reporting and communications between Bungendore and the Australian Government Crisis Coordination Centre, he said.

“But the final link in the chain from that centre, from the federal government to the states, is missing,” he said. "“The technology is there. We have the emergency alert system for bushfires and floods. It’s just the political management of the task that has to be sorted out between the federal and the state level."

Source

I live not far from Bungendore, well within the notional fallout zone. I have contemplated whether I would want to survive a nuclear attack. I have a vague idea of what it might be like: I was a spectator of the Cuban missile crisis.

My conclusion — written in the comfort of my own home on a full stomach — is no, I do not want to survive in a post-nuclear world. Snuff me out please and be done with it. In fact, my greatest fear is that I would become an irradiated, maimed piece of human wreckage staggering from ruin to ruin looking for food and wishing to die.

Do I deceive myself? I don't know.

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Just a coincidence I am sure

Check the short video below.  Seems NBC news was given a guided tour of the Hawaii EOC 24 hours before this alarm went out.  The subject of an inbound missile is specifically discussed. Go to the 5:00 mark if you are time challenged. Just a coincidence I imagine.

 

Wheels within wheels methinks.

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Nuclear Shakespeare? Much Ado........
sand_puppy wrote:

Stupid stupid stupid mistake?  Hold my beer and watch me do something really crazy?  Hack of the broadcast system by someone who wanted to let someone know that they could? 

Turns out it was nothing more than a mistake.  The screen caps I've seen of the message/warning selection menu could be confusing to some.

Quote:

A real blip on a screen that someone (or some machine) briefly thought might actually be a launch?

Not likely.  While historically there have been about three false alarm events per week that trigger MDCs (Missile Display Conferences), the vast majority are typically resolved as non-events within minutes if not seconds.  We use Dual Sensor Phenomenology (multiple sensor IR and/or radar) to confirm a launch event.  Many times these detected events are consistent with publicly (or properly within private comms channels) announced events like a satellite launch or rocket motor ground testing.  The US military (NORAD under NORTHCOM in conjunction with USSTRATCOM/USSPACECOM) is the cognizant authority that employs these systems.  In the event of a validated Missile Event, once laydown fans and rough projected impact areas have been calculated, the appropriate (affected) civil defense authorities are informed so their notification protocols can be activated.  Along with the appropriate military response actions.

The system doesn't work backwards however.  NORAD has no direct input in states' civil defense systems so "they" had no way to override or correct the erroneous notification.  Based on experience gained from my previous tours at STRATCOM, my best guess is the watch team received notification of the Hawaii CDW warning and went "Huh?!?!"  In the event of a "real" launch, their systems would have already been triggered.  The report was determined to be invalid within seconds.  Hawaii CDW flat out blew this one. 

Now, not to diminish the fears of those Hawaiians (and their loved ones in CONUS) who are not familiar with the way nuclear launch detection and warning works, a little knowledge and attention would have helped.  To date, North Korea has yet to conduct a successful launch of a missile capable of ranging Hawaii or the US.  They have yet to achieve exoatmospheric flight over intercontinental ranges with even a simple booster, much less a delivery platform with a mated dummy physics package.

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HI system hacked?

Well, Business Insider has an interesting article up the main thrust of which is that during the recent media tour of the facility which was broadcast, there's a password on a sticky note that's legibly in the background.

Oops?

(Source)

Seems more possible now that someone could have gotten in?  Regardless, that's some crappy security practices right there.

 

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Terrible Message Menu

This didn't help.  (This is being circulated as the message menu option for Hawaii's EOC, so I'm going to assume it's validity)

Maybe it's just the nuke in me, but I would have message selection menus divided a lot better than this.  Like maybe a "Drill/System Test" section separated from a prioritized and categorized "Real World Event" section?

Hell, my OCD is screeching at me because it's not even in alphabetical or numeric order.  Good thing I am also ADD/ADHD so I only care for a little bit....

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Whatever

Japan sends false North Korean missile alert days after Hawaii made the same mistake (Daily News)

Quote:

TOKYO — Japan's public broadcaster mistakenly sent an alert Tuesday warning citizens of a North Korean missile launch and urging them to seek immediate shelter, then minutes later corrected it, days after a similar error in Hawaii.

NHK television issued the message on its internet and mobile news sites as well as on Twitter, saying North Korea appeared to have fired a missile at Japan. It said the government was telling people to evacuate and take shelter.

Quote:

The false alarm came just days after Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency sent a mistaken warning of a North Korean missile attack to mobile phones across the state, triggering panic.

NHK said the mistake was the result of an error by a staff member who was operating the alert system for online news, but did not elaborate. NHK deleted the tweet and text warning after several minutes, issued a correction and apologized several times on air and on other formats.

Coincidence? Yeah, right.....

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Missing Screen Cap

Apparently the ability to attach a picture is beyond me....I should maybe be a Civil Defense message operator?

This didn't help.  (This is being circulated as the message menu option for Hawaii's EOC, so I'm going to assume it's validity)

Maybe it's just the nuke in me, but I would have message selection menus divided a lot better than this.  Like maybe a "Drill/System Test" section separated from a prioritized and categorized "Real World Event" section?

Hell, my OCD is screeching at me because it's not even in alphabetical or numeric order.  Good thing I am also ADD/ADHD so I only care for a little bit....

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Spelling Mistake?

I think they might have spelled "BMD" incorrectly.  Shouldn't it have an "F" in place of the "M"?  They could also consider using some funky font, like DingDongs (or whatever it's called), to set the important options apart from the otherwise haphazard selection list (assuming of course that this image isn't some "gone viral" fake).

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This wasn't my experience...

when I conducted a walkthrough of a Lockheed occupied building in Sunnyvale in the late 80's. I represented a life insurance company in the acquisition of the building for a real estate investment portfolio that I managed. During my due diligence inspection, sirens would go off on each floor as I stepped out of the elevator. The building had security bars installed in all of the ductwork in order to discourage intruders from crawling through the ductwork. Likely a Skunk Works facility... 

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How would we know someone didn't REALLY shoot a missile at us?

How would we know someone didn't REALLY shoot a missile at us? What if the "FAT FINGER mistake" was the cover up. Why would Japan make the same mistake three days later?

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/16/578283950/japan-also-...

I heard an interesting interview several years ago on KGO radio. Radio Show host Gill Gross was interviewing Kenneth Sewell, the author of Red Star Rogue.

https://www.amazon.com/Red-Star-Rogue-Submarines-Nuclear-ebook/dp/B001NI...

The book was about a Rogue Russian Submarine (K-129) that tried to launch a missile at Hawaii. It was a failed launch that exploded in the launch tube and sank the submarine in one of the deepest parts of the Pacific Ocean. With several other nuclear warheads in submarine, this book covers how the United States recovered the warheads, mainly because it didn't want them to fall into anyone else s hands.

I don't have any new information that suggests that someone really fired at us, but I can't help but think,"Would our government really tell the American public if there was a failed attempt to launch a missile at us?" This book was published in 2005 and covers a story from the Nixon administration.

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Interesting Scenarios

I read this article a few days ago.  It describes some interesting (at least IMO) potential thought processes that can occur when things don't happen as planned (I guess that's being a tinge facetious).  The "1983" reference is about the shootdown of a Korean airliner that year.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/14/world/asia/hawaii-false-alarm-north-k...

“Today’s false alarm in Hawaii a reminder of the big risks we continue to run by relying on nuclear deterrence/prompt launch nuclear posture,” Kingston Reif, an analyst with the Arms Control Association, wrote on Twitter, referring to the strategy of firing quickly in a war. “And while deterring/containing North Korea is far preferable to preventive war, it’s not risk free. And it could fail.”

If similar misunderstandings seem implausible today, consider that an initial White House statement called Hawaii’s alert an exercise — though state officials say it was operator error. Consider that 38 minutes elapsed before emergency systems sent a second message announcing the mistake. If even Washington was misreading events, the confusion in Pyongyang must have been far greater.

Had the turmoil unfolded during a major crisis or period of heightened threats, North Korean leaders could have misread the Hawaiian warning as cover for an attack, much as the Soviets had done in 1983. American officials have been warning for weeks that they might attack North Korea. Though some analysts consider this a likely bluff, officials in Pyongyang have little room for error.

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Posts: 436
RE: EMP resistant vechicles

"One thing you might want to do is get an old car. The old Land Cruisers are advertised as EMP resistant due to the lack of electronics. The freeways won't be cluttered since most cars would be dead. But driving will make you a moving target in a big city."

Actually most vehicles are EMP resistant due to their noisy nature. About a decade ago test were done on 37 cars models and none suffer permanent damage:

https://www.lifewire.com/would-your-car-survive-an-emp-attack-3903248

"In a study released in 2004, the EMP Commission subjected 37 different cars and trucks to simulated EMP attacks and found that none of them suffered permanent, crippling damage, although the results were somewhat mixed."

"The study subjected vehicles to simulated EMP attacks both while shut off and while running, and it found that none of the vehicles suffered any ill effects if the attack occurred while the engine was off. When the attack occurred while the vehicles were running, some of them shut off, while others suffered other effects like erroneously blinking dash lights."

 

What probably will fail is the car radio since the RF amplifier will probably be damaged. Most RF devices will fail (Smartphones, Wifi, Radios, TVs, etc). Devices connect to the grid will probably fail since the power cables connecting them will collect a lot of power from the EMP.

 

 

 

 

thatchmo's picture
thatchmo
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 14 2008
Posts: 462
At that point, you'll

At that point, you'll probably just be happy if your rototiller, chipper/shredder, generator, and wood splitter start up.  'Course, millions will be anxious to leave the city, I 'spose....I recently read that there would be a large difference in effects between a nuclear-created EMP, and a solar-inspired event.  Aloha, Steve.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 25 2009
Posts: 1199
A good team

of drafts will be worth a lot. Best get your mare settled.

thatchmo's picture
thatchmo
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 14 2008
Posts: 462
What's worse?

A false alert, or a failure to alert?  So, a short while back, a "false alert" for a low-probability, high-impact event.  Ballistic missile strike. OK.  Couple days ago, failure to alert the populace for a medium-probability, medium-to-high impact event- possible tsunami from 7.9 earthquake.  I received no official notice except for an email from the Coast Guard two hours after the 'quake saying "there's been a 'quake".  If a tsunami had been generated, it would take about 5 hours to reach Hawaii.  These threats happen with some regularity here in Hawaii, and I respond by going to my shop (5' above sea level), no matter the hour, to secure my business as I can.  Has happened probably 3 times in the last 6 or 7 years.....I'm going to be asking some of my EMA associates why the failure to notify.  My trust in government is diminishing (is that possible?).  Go figure....Aloha, Steve.

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