1 Month Food Storage Supply

29 posts / 0 new
Last post
Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
1 Month Food Storage Supply

 

I know there's been shortages as reported about Mountain House lately. And with a few power outages we had last month, I realized it was time to do more than just deepen our pantry. Despite having just a one-bedroom apartment and limited storage space, I went ahead and bought two of these via Costco.com for $99.99 each: Chef's Banquet ARK 1 month food storage supply.(2000 calories/day for one person for a month).

Also saw on sale at Costco.com for $89.99, Food For Health Vegetarian Emergency Food Kit (275 servings).

There were also one-year supplies that were cheaper than buying 12 one-month supplies, but they sold out.

I would say Costco has the best value. The price already includes shipping and handling. Both have shelf lives estimated from 15 to 20 years or so. The only drawback I see is the high sodium content, but I believe if you stick to the serving sizes and supplement with rice and beans (say, pouring a soup or stew over cooked rice and beans), and buy some multi-vitamins, you'll be good.

Any other great deals out there comparable or better than what Costco offers? I've noticed most of the survival-related web sites charge a lot more.

Poet

 

docmims's picture
docmims
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2009
Posts: 644
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

If you are forced to eat your food storage for real emergency, I don't think excess salt is a big factor and may in fact be beneficial if you are doing more strenuous work to survive.  Most canned foods will last over 10 yrs, although they aren't sold that way.  It is extremely cheap to buy canned foods on sale.  They had a sale on Libby's vegetables last summer for 50c a can which with the 5 50c coupons (which doubled) got me 10 cans for free out of the 4 cases I bought.

You really don't have to buy the high tech expensive 20yr stuff to have a good storage system. I was doing the extreme couponing thing a bit last summer, but I quit because i didn't have any more room for the food and ended up  giving a lot of it to the food bank.

 

Edit:

Just thought to make myself clearer.  A one year food supply does not have to break the bank, and be something you stick in the closet for 20 yrs.  It is much more satisfying  to be food that I am happy to eat with my normal meals and will eat through and save money this year -- all the while adding more as i eat what I have.  In other words my one year food supply is at most 1 or 2 yrs old.  Besides what are you going to do in 2031 after the nuclear strike --- "Gee Marge the food supply expiration date was last month, guess we have to throw it out!"

Pops's picture
Pops
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 11 2011
Posts: 31
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

We've always had food "storage" but it's just regular stuff, not nitro-packed or MREs or anything (well.. some). We just buy extra when it's on sale or we see too much shelf. You don't want to be changing your diet when you are laid-off or whatever, kids especially want what they are used to and when other things are stressed normal food would be a comfort.

:^)

docmims's picture
docmims
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2009
Posts: 644
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

I like Pops matter of fact post. Just buy normal food with a long shelf life on sale.  It is very, very easy to cut your food bill 50 percent without a single coupon by watching the sales and catching the rhythm of the sale rotation(here in GA the stores are on a 6wk rotation so something on sale this week will be on the same sale in 6wks like clockwork).  With a  lot of work it can be 80 percent savings -- my best was $445 total groceries for $48, but that was doing strange stuff like $60 of crest toothpaste for free because of coupon doubling. (like I said before the food bank benefits because i don't need a 20yr supply of toothpaste)  I am not a socialist like matrix, but I don't mind furnishing the food bank on "the man's" dime.Smile

 

Common sense:  A 1yr food supply is just that: a 1yr food supply.  It will be gone after 1yr if you are forced to eat it.  It doesn't have to last 20yrs, You just eat it as your normal food.  Just my 2c.

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

 

Thanks for the information, Pops and DocMims

We do have a few cupboards in our small apartment kitchen, where I store canned goods and some bags of grain. Those can easily last several years if left untouched. But we cook from our "pantry" as well, so in reality it wouldn't last more than two weeks if that was what we were reduced to eating.

Having the extra 1-month supply in such a small form factor (a 6.5 gallon bucket) was what I was looking for. It can easily last longer with rice and beans supplementation.

Poet

 

Tycer's picture
Tycer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 26 2009
Posts: 617
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

Poet,

For conserving space, a dehydrator is pretty amazing. Yesterday I dehydrated three 14oz bags of PictSweet frozen peas and they fit in a pint jar when done! The peas were on sale for 79¢ a bag. Doing corn today.

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply
Tycer wrote:

Poet,

For conserving space, a dehydrator is pretty amazing. Yesterday I dehydrated three 14oz bags of PictSweet frozen peas and they fit in a pint jar when done! The peas were on sale for 79¢ a bag. Doing corn today.

Tycer

That's amazing how much space you saved! I'll have to look into that!

Poet

Tycer's picture
Tycer
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 26 2009
Posts: 617
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

I understand why, but I'm surprised that the three bags of corn filled a quart jar and the peas a pint.

VeganDB12's picture
VeganDB12
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 18 2008
Posts: 757
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

 

Poet and all

Thanks for the info. I like the Costco link for vegetarian foods, they are pretty convenient and I love the individually packaged dehydrated pre-cooked beans option. They are individually wrapped and the price isn't bad given all of that.  I agree the salt is probably a plus for some of us unless there is a blood pressure issue, at least for flavor.Add to that my little pot of herbs in the window, sprouts and the canned vegetables from Sam's Club (50 cents for a can of corn, about 75 for a can of green beans) , 3 dollar a pound chock full o nuts coffein a 3 pound can, all under my bed. I hope I have a decent enough setup. 

 

Denise

albinorhino's picture
albinorhino
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 14 2009
Posts: 23
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply
Tycer wrote:

I understand why, but I'm surprised that the three bags of corn filled a quart jar and the peas a pint.

We have been dehydrating frozen vegetable for the past 3-4 months. The only thing that comes to mind re the peas being reduced so much is that they are mostly water. We dehydrate the Walmart brand frozen veggies, and 3 pounds of green peas are almost exactly one quart after drying. On the other hand, 4 pounds of crinkle cut sliced carrots only fill a pint jar--obviously much more water in the carrots than the peas.

After drying and temp storage in jars, we vacuum-seal the dehydrated vegetables with an oxygen absorber in bags for long-term storage.

Jager06's picture
Jager06
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 2 2009
Posts: 395
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

I have been buying dehydrated meals from a multi level marketing I joined. I can write off the storage space for the food, I can write of the price of the food as inventory and I can do it for five years before having to declare that the company is insolvent. A tax write off for food storage, makes it about free. And I don't have to pester anyone about it either.

It tastes pretty darn good and is 100% natural vegetarian, GMO free, and mostly gluten free. Well, the Beef Stroganoff I think tastes like crap,but all the other meals have been great. We eat it now, so I know we will all eat it in an emergency and not have dietary shock. It stores for 15 years...

http://pthree.myefoods.com

I was hesitant to post this because of the bad rap with the MLMs, but really it's exactly what I needed to top off our food storage and just happens to pay a couple bucks a month on top of the tax savings.

Best wishes,

Jager06

Edited: I almost forgot there are free meals available to try at the website as well. If nothing else do that!

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
eFoods Global MLM Food Storage Review
Jager06 wrote:

I have been buying dehydrated meals from a multi level marketing.

Jager06

I should preface this with a statement of how greatly I value your contributions to this community. Your personal background, small business experience, and willingness to help others are what help make this a great place to be.

I did check it out and considered it when you posted about this in a small business thread a while back. I even went as far as reading up on the compensation scheme, the pyramidal setup (to "true" infinity, "life codes"), etc. I ended up doing research...

1. FOOD COST: So eFoods Global (the MLM system) has a sister company eFoods Direct (direct sales).

On the eFoods Direct (online store) I saw a 2-month "Grab-n-Go Pack" for $399.95 (and also $62.90 shipping/handling, assuming delivery to Zip Code 10001) on the eFoods Direct site. Now, granted, there's some interesting variety (including breads, apple cinnamon oatmeal, etc. along with the usual cheddar broccoli) and they count  6 one-cup "meals" per day (that's nicer than a lot of sites). So 319 meals + snacks (55 apple drinks and 4 pounds of fruit medley) is their calculation for one person for 60 days. Any feedback in terms of calories per day would be helpful, but I didn't quite see that.

On the eFoods Global (online MLM store site), I saw a "Serve, Save, & Share Pack" for $339.95 (and also $23.29 shipping/handling, assuming delivery to Zip Code 10001). It contains 380 servings of similar foods as the "Grab-n-Go" (soups, entrees - and milk and breads/muffins, which also count also as servings - but not apple drink). I noticed it doesn't state explicitly how much the food should last if someone wanted to buy "food for one person for one month" like the above, but I suspect it's roughly 60 days here as well. Any feedback here in terms of calories per day would be helpful, but I didn't see that as available (unless I wanted to manually count up all the different nutrition data.

The "6 FREE meals" trial (just pay $9.95 for shipping) sounds interesting, but I suspect like many offers, the $9.95 for "shipping" entirely covers their baseline food and food-packaging costs if not more. What you get: 2 servings each of 3 kinds of soups - probably under 1,000 calories in total, unless each "meal" is two servings.

Cost-to-end-consumer-wise, people can buy from a variety of places and do their own comparisons. Personally, after considering eFoods and other sites, I ended up buying from Costco.com after because the Chef's Banquet ARK (1 month supply - soups, pastas, milk whey, chocolate milk whey, and orange breakfast drink - 2,000 calories/day) was $99.99, including shipping/handling).

2. MLM COST: I noticed you have to pay $29.95 for the eBiz Kit and to become an IBO (Independent Business Owner). Then every 4 weeks, you must either sell or personally buy a Personal Qualifying Volume of 80 every 4 weeks (sounds like a dedicated volume/income stream to eFoods, especially with the Automatic Replenishment Order) in order to qualify for commissions/bonuses and in order to be considered active. Hey, if 16 new people buy the "6 FREE meals" (plus $9.95 shipping), you're covered for that 4 week period! If you can't, you better start signing up Preferred Customers or buying on your own.

3. MLM PROFITS: Like all MLMs, you got to get people under you working for you in order to get the real bucks. And that means a large amount of the price to the end consumer ends up being profit stream to the seller and those above them. That might explain the cost differentials. As an end consumer, I see my goal is to buy it as cheaply as possible without having to pay too much of an upstream profit margin to anyone - whether a corporation like Costco or an MLM chain and corporation.

I should mention also that I am familiar with Sunrider and Melaleucca, so I have personal knowledge of MLM systems, especially its effects on those who don't have the kind of entrepreneurial skills or social network to sell to, but are easily persuaded to join up and try - often those with limited income, where it becomes a financial drain.

I won't deny that it can be a great profit-making opportunity for those who are great at selling and networking and persuading people. The tax advantage of storing edible merchandise ostensibly for sale, but eating if/when needed (or even reporting "shrinkage" or giving away as free samples to "customers") - those are definitely things to consider.

However, I just am not sure that eFoods products is the best value for an end user like me, and as an MLM seller, I wouldn't feel comfortable trying to persuade my retirement-aged parents to buy this when there are other, better values out there. So personally I think I'll decline the offer - even the "6 FREE meals", seeing as me spending about just 10 times more gets me 50 times more product from Costco.

Thank you.

Poet

Jager06's picture
Jager06
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 2 2009
Posts: 395
Re: eFoods Global MLM Food Storage Review

Poet,

Great work. Thanks for taking the time to do the leg work on this. I have done the same and obviously taken a different path.

One thing I want to say is that this is supplemental storage for us. We have our food supplies secured and now organize monthly trips with the local Mormons to their "Bishop's Storehouse" for anyone in our community who wants to go. I have been told that our monthly forays now account for more product sales than the Mormons themselves from this area. We volunteer with the canning process at the store house and hauling it all back to various folks who might not have a vehicle or trailer capable of handling it. I also give classes to anyone who can put more than one person in a room to learn to fill 5 gal buckets and do other forms of storage.

I view this as the icing on the cake for storage, truly. The beans, rice, wheat, flour, dried apples, honey, sugar and other basics should be in place before ramping into more expensive pre-made meals. That is my opinion though. When considering the less expensive pre-made meals, I also took into account food sources, GMO, additives, etc. Most of the alternatives are made from GMO based products with some pretty unappetizing ingredients for longevity. I have not sampled every item on the market, so please do not consider me a reliable source for healthy or unhealthy food storage products.

As for the MLM, well, we all know the hype. I am not a prolific "signer-upper" although I do advertise in several magazines like "10-4" and "Back Home". The income I receive is used for additional advertising and placement into those down below me who are struggling. The free food credits are used to support local food banks, and others who are trying to get started with some food storage but may not have the financial wherewithal.

MLM tends to be predatory, I agree, but I like to think I am mitigating that somewhat.

Thanks again for your thoughtful response, and for all the work you consistently do around here.

Best Wishes,

Jager06

earthwise's picture
earthwise
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2009
Posts: 848
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

 

Great work Jager, a hat tip to you for expanding beyond your own needs into the larger community. Obviously this is important. If a truly catastophic breakdown were to occur, then the more people who are prepared, the less people there will be to depend on emergency responses from society, and the more that those who have prepared beyond their own needs, the more that the prepared folks will be able to help others. The more resiliency in individuals the more resilient the society.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

One thing that I found helpful was to buy a lot of dried lentils, split peas, and pearl barley. They store very well and give variety and can make tasty soups with or without an added meat.We also have a lot of dry brown rice. We use these all the time and replenish as we go along.

But do not neglect to buy whatever flavorings you normally use in such typical soups and stews. Examples: Bay leaves do not grow around here and I like them in soups and stews. We bought them CHEAP in the Hispanic foods section of our store, in lightly-sealed bags stapled to cardboard labels, and we just transferred them to Ziplock bags. I'm big on storing chicken and beef bullion, too. For sweeter things you need sugar, cinnamon, vanilla (or vanallin) and whatever else your family uses.For that matter, store salt: two kinds. You absolutely need iodized table salt to avoid goiters (thyroid swelling) and you need pickling salt (non iodozed) to preserve meat and pickle foods. Salt is essential: they used to pay people in salt; that's where we got the word "salary."

Just don't forget to stock things that make meals edible. A pantry full of wheat, dried corn, rice and oatmeal will get pretty insipid without flavorings.

 

sevenmmm's picture
sevenmmm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 19 2011
Posts: 108
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply
safewrite wrote:

One thing that I found helpful was to buy a lot of dried lentils, split peas, and pearl barley. They store very well and give variety and can make tasty soups with or without an added meat.We also have a lot of dry brown rice. We use these all the time and replenish as we go along.

But do not neglect to buy whatever flavorings you normally use in such typical soups and stews. Examples: Bay leaves do not grow around here and I like them in soups and stews. We bought them CHEAP in the Hispanic foods section of our store, in lightly-sealed bags stapled to cardboard labels, and we just transferred them to Ziplock bags. I'm big on storing chicken and beef bullion, too. For sweeter things you need sugar, cinnamon, vanilla (or vanallin) and whatever else your family uses.For that matter, store salt: two kinds. You absolutely need iodized table salt to avoid goiters (thyroid swelling) and you need pickling salt (non iodozed) to preserve meat and pickle foods. Salt is essential: they used to pay people in salt; that's where we got the word "salary."

Just don't forget to stock things that make meals edible. A pantry full of wheat, dried corn, rice and oatmeal will get pretty insipid without flavorings.

 

 

OK!

Saffron's picture
Saffron
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 29 2009
Posts: 250
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply
safewrite wrote:

Just don't forget to stock things that make meals edible. A pantry full of wheat, dried corn, rice and oatmeal will get pretty insipid without flavorings.

Don't forget oil ... not only does it make everything taste better, but we need the calorie content, especially if we are making do with less.

According to a preparedness talk from an ex-prisoner of war in Germany, the most valuable items during days of starvation were:

• oil (with a bottle of vegetable oil, one could acquire nearly every other desirable item)

 • grain (When grain is well-packed and well-preserved, it too is easy to transport, easy to store, and will last for generations.)

 • honey (during the starvation period in postwar Germany, honey could be traded for three times as much as sugar; its value was considered that much greater.

 • Powdered milk.

 These four basic items—oil, wheat, honey, and milk (or their equivalents in other cultures)—together with water, salt, and renewable basic foods such as potatoes and other vegetables, can satisfy nutritional requirements in times of emergency and also are valuable and usable in normal daily life.


Since most vegetable oils are rancid even before we purchase them, stick with olive oil in dark bottles and coconut oil which is a great energy booster. If you have access to animals of course you can render tallow and lard ... don't forget to save the bacon fat!
Coconut milk powder is a good option for powdered milk, since the only powdered milk I can find is skim or non-fat.
~ s

 

 

 

Aaron M's picture
Aaron M
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2373
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

In addition to Salt and Oil, you all might consider picking up items that don't grow domestically...
Pepper, Cinnamon and cane sugar are all intelligent purchases before the crash - once it hits, people will start remembering how much these types of things contributed to their diet.

Edit: and coffee... people always remember booze, and forget coffee.

Also, items like Cheese Cloth are extremely valuable for making cheese, wine and vinegar.
I didn't see any mention, sorry if this is redundant.

Cheers,

Aaron 

 

docmims's picture
docmims
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 17 2009
Posts: 644
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply

Don't forget the salt bloxks.  If you are subsistence hunting, ie life and death; shooting over a salt lick is low maintence and there are no game wardens.

earthwise's picture
earthwise
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2009
Posts: 848
Re: 1 Month Food Storage Supply
Saffron wrote:
safewrite wrote:

Just don't forget to stock things that make meals edible. A pantry full of wheat, dried corn, rice and oatmeal will get pretty insipid without flavorings.

Don't forget oil ... not only does it make everything taste better, but we need the calorie content, especially if we are making do with less.

According to a preparedness talk from an ex-prisoner of war in Germany, the most valuable items during days of starvation were:

• oil (with a bottle of vegetable oil, one could acquire nearly every other desirable item)

 • grain (When grain is well-packed and well-preserved, it too is easy to transport, easy to store, and will last for generations.)

 • honey (during the starvation period in postwar Germany, honey could be traded for three times as much as sugar; its value was considered that much greater.

 • Powdered milk.

 These four basic items—oil, wheat, honey, and milk (or their equivalents in other cultures)—together with water, salt, and renewable basic foods such as potatoes and other vegetables, can satisfy nutritional requirements in times of emergency and also are valuable and usable in normal daily life.


Since most vegetable oils are rancid even before we purchase them, stick with olive oil in dark bottles and coconut oil which is a great energy booster. If you have access to animals of course you can render tallow and lard ... don't forget to save the bacon fat!
Coconut milk powder is a good option for powdered milk, since the only powdered milk I can find is skim or non-fat.
~ s

 

 

 

An option for oil can be found here for those with the capabilities of growing sunflowers.

speed's picture
speed
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 20 2011
Posts: 4
hello all..   quick

hello all..

 

quick question on the costco ark one month food supply.. how much water is needed for each bin?

maybe im blind but I cant find the info on their site

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
Water Needed, Heat Needed, Pot Or Saucepan Needed
speed wrote:

hello all..

quick question on the costco ark one month food supply.. how much water is needed for each bin?

maybe im blind but I cant find the info on their site

Speed

Sorry, there's never FULL information out there. Just gotta buy it and know having multi-vitamins and purified fish oil around will be helpful, too.

You will definitely need water to rehydrate, pots, and a source of heat to cook the dehydrated soups, pasta, etc. though you could probably get by with just lukewarm water for the drink mixes (including milk whey).

As for how much, that I cannot tell you. We did open the mylar pouch of broccoli cheddar soup mix and found it needed about 2 to 3 cups water for each cup of the mix. You obviously have to use up the resealable pouch's contents after a while. probably within a month or two.

I haven't tried the other stuff (it's for an emergency, after all), but I found the broccoli cheddar soup looked thin until the water started boiling - then all of a sudden it looked more creamy and bulked up. Probably a result of the starch in it.

We also found that putting vegetables - fresh broccoli, carrot "coins - in helped a lot, too, in making the overall meal tastier and less full of sodium. I bet adding some rice or beans would be good, too.

Poet

speed's picture
speed
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 20 2011
Posts: 4
water needed
Poet wrote:
speed wrote:

hello all..

quick question on the costco ark one month food supply.. how much water is needed for each bin?

maybe im blind but I cant find the info on their site

Speed

Sorry, there's never FULL information out there. Just gotta buy it and know having multi-vitamins and purified fish oil around will be helpful, too.

You will definitely need water to rehydrate, pots, and a source of heat to cook the dehydrated soups, pasta, etc. though you could probably get by with just lukewarm water for the drink mixes (including milk whey).

As for how much, that I cannot tell you. We did open the mylar pouch of broccoli cheddar soup mix and found it needed about 2 to 3 cups water for each cup of the mix. You obviously have to use up the resealable pouch's contents after a while. probably within a month or two.

I haven't tried the other stuff (it's for an emergency, after all), but I found the broccoli cheddar soup looked thin until the water started boiling - then all of a sudden it looked more creamy and bulked up. Probably a result of the starch in it.

We also found that putting vegetables - fresh broccoli, carrot "coins - in helped a lot, too, in making the overall meal tastier and less full of sodium. I bet adding some rice or beans would be good, too.

Poet

thanks Poet

I just watched a few youtube videos (of ppl unpacking) and added it up..

it ends up needing 242 cups of water for each kit (just over 15 gallons of water)

wow thats a crazy amount of extra water

Travlin's picture
Travlin
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 15 2010
Posts: 1322
Serious short coming

Speed

You have just identified a serious short coming with dehydrated foods that need to be reconstituted to eat.  All that food does you very little good if you lack a large amount of water.  You may not be able to digest it without sucking more water from your body.

Guidelines say you need a minimum of one gallon per person per day for survival, with more for high activity or high heat.  Two gallons gives you standard cooking and basic hygiene.  That’s 30 – 60 gallons per person for one month and takes up a lot of storage if you don’t have a reliable supply you can filter.  Water is very heavy to carry any distance, like 40 pounds per five gallons.  Watering holes are also a primary place of danger “in the wild”.

You can store a month’s worth of boxed and canned goods under your bed, and many are packed in water or syrup for extra liquid.  They may not last as long, but are easy to rotate.  They will also cost much less.

Travlin 

speed's picture
speed
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 20 2011
Posts: 4
Travlin
Travlin wrote:

Speed

You have just identified a serious short coming with dehydrated foods that need to be reconstituted to eat.  All that food does you very little good if you lack a large amount of water.  You may not be able to digest it without sucking more water from your body.

Guidelines say you need a minimum of one gallon per person per day for survival, with more for high activity or high heat.  Two gallons gives you standard cooking and basic hygiene.  That’s 30 – 60 gallons per person for one month and takes up a lot of storage if you don’t have a reliable supply you can filter.  Water is very heavy to carry any distance, like 40 pounds per five gallons.  Watering holes are also a primary place of danger “in the wild”.

You can store a month’s worth of boxed and canned goods under your bed, and many are packed in water or syrup for extra liquid.  They may not last as long, but are easy to rotate.  They will also cost much less.

Travlin 

we have just about 2 1/2 weeks worth of can goods, + a weeks of mre's + 20 gallons (4x5gallon) set aside for emergency only

and been rotating out the can goods (every year) and water supply (every month 2 bottles)

I was just looking for something else to add our supplies, I guess my goal is to have enough for a month for a family of 4

Poet's picture
Poet
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 21 2009
Posts: 1892
Videos Of The Chef Banquet Ark 1 Month Food Supply

 

Speed

Thanks for pointing out the videos. I've taken the liberty of linking to them here. They're by SafeArmsReview (Steve and Kyong) on Youtube.

I don't consider relying on these entirely, though you could. As I mentioned before, adding any kinds of vegetables into the soups or stew, pouring it over rice or beans or split peas or lentils, will be very helpful in stretching it out.

Unboxing The Bucket (12:40)

Testing 3 Soups (37:34:)

Poet

speed's picture
speed
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 20 2011
Posts: 4
I was not sure if I was able

I was not sure if I was able to post links (sorry I havent read the forum rules) :)

kolcan900's picture
kolcan900
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 19 2009
Posts: 12
Food Storage wholesale

So not sure if this is the right location to post this but I'll offer it up.  I work directly with virtually all the major food storage companies.  I have a small company that reps products to them.  That being said I can get any of their products wholesale.  If the CM community wanted to organize a group buy I'd be happy to facilitate it.  It could be from several of the available food companies not just one.  This would make pricing in the 40% off range.  Yes, even cheaper than you could get it at Costco.  The short list of those available would be.  Augason Farms, Honeyville grains, Legacy foods. Efoods, Food Storage Chef, Food for Health, Lindon Farms, Shelf Reliance(Thrive) Saratoga Farms etc.  I work with them all.  I can access all of it at wholesale pricing.  If this is of interest then someone organize this and let me know what is wanted.  Hope this helps.  Please dont take this as a business venture for me.  I dont get anything out of this.  I dont sell food.  I just have access to all of them wholesale....

Ben

Hrunner's picture
Hrunner
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 28 2010
Posts: 256
Interested in Honeyville

Kolcan,

Thank you for your generous offer.   FWIW, the only vendor I am familiar with is Honeyville grains, and I have wanted to order some bulk food from them, i.e. buckwheat, oats, corn etc.  40% discount would make it very attractive.

I'll throw my interested hat in the ring.  What is the minimum buy (volume, dollars) to be considered a "group"?

Thank you,

Hrunner

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments