Why it’s so hard to be a Peak Prosperity reader sometimes…

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  • Tue, Oct 29, 2013 - 02:55pm

    #21
    treemagnet

    treemagnet

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    It ain’t easy being green

or so said Kermit the Frog.  I agree with your post but really, you know the answer – you've got the luxury of no choice.  So my 'sage' advice is play the hand your dealt and at least consider drinking heavily.  Humor aside, your efforts thus far sound impressive – take a break and pat yourself on the back, come back with a fresh perspective. 

  • Wed, Oct 30, 2013 - 12:42am

    #22
    marky

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    Dear Snydeman

"Don't believe everything you think" may be advice worth considering.  I've been through various ways of looking at the world in my life, times when I thought I hated the system (teenaged socialist), times when I thought I loved it (yuppie time) and times when I couldn't wait for it to fall apart.  But through all of these phases, and many others, my mental framework for looking at the world was always wrong.  I was just projecting on to it an idea of how I wanted it to be, for my own reasons that I didn't really understand at the time – mostly some sort of fearful reasoning.  Eventually, I saw this pattern in myself and started to stop taking too seriously the stories I told myself (it took me a while to get out of the habit, still working on it). 

Really, all we have is the present moment and going about our business and being alive right now is quite pleasant, mostly.  But when we drag in our mental frameworks for how we expect the world to be (for example, "it should be collapsing already") that's when we get disappointed.  Not that the world disappoints us (say, by not collapsing) – it just makes us realize how wrong our expectations were. And after enough disappointments, our minds can get tired of having to reevaluate and float another framework (depression).  But we're really doing all this to ourselves by setting up these expectations in our heads.  Sure, it makes a lot of sense to prepare for a difficult times – we're in difficult times already.  But try just to focus on the fun to be had in doing the prep. work, and don't get too worked up about how things are supposed to work out in the macro sense, because we will all be wrong on that one.  And if the prep. work is not fun, or at least is not tolerable, then you shouldn't be doing it.  One day, or moment, at a time. Plus beer, preferably home brew, is always helpful.

As regards the ways to teach kids about our predicament, I've talked to my own kids about how the way we live today is kind of a blip. I don't want to freak them out, and don't talk too much about when it might end, but I do want them to know that this current phase in world history is not normal – it was only really their parents and grandparents that jumped the shark on the driving-and-shopping thing.  Previous generations were a bit more focused on the basics of getting by. Maybe there's a way of looking at it from that historical perspective that could help? 

Good luck!

  • Wed, Oct 30, 2013 - 03:33pm

    #23
    ckessel

    ckessel

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    AMEN to that

Hi Sager,

I read you loud and clear!   It is tough at times but always getting better as the level of acceptance goes in.

As my Dad always used to say: "don't let the bastards get you down!"

Have a great day and watch the PM market after the Bernank makes his FOMC remarks today.  JP Morgan is now long on gold!!!!!

Coop

  • Thu, Oct 31, 2013 - 01:09am

    #24

    pinecarr

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    Great suggestions, SagerXX

…I think #1, 2, 4 and 5 are all really important.  But the one that jumps out at me as something I need to do to make it for the long haul is #3; making a point of doing something that gives me soul satisfaction every day – even for 5 minutes.  It is way too easy to get over-focused on the prepping (because it is important), and trying to stay on top every bit of news about where we are at this instant in the collapse.  And that on top of all of life's other demands is very fatiguing.  We need that relationship with whatever gives us joy in life to keep our chins up, and to make life worth living as we go through these times of change.  Thanks for the reminder!

  • Thu, Oct 31, 2013 - 09:20am

    #25

    Dutch John

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    Choice?

Treemagnet,

You wrote: "the luxury of no choice". Guess you mean: the luxury of choice. What is wrong with choosing for voluntary poverty and exploring new directions, when the alternative is contributing to consumerism?

Regards, DJ

  • Thu, Oct 31, 2013 - 11:35am

    #26

    SagerXX

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    pinecarr wrote:…I

[quote=pinecarr]

…I think #1, 2, 4 and 5 are all really important.  But the one that jumps out at me as something I need to do to make it for the long haul is #3; making a point of doing something that gives me soul satisfaction every day – even for 5 minutes.  It is way too easy to get over-focused on the prepping (because it is important), and trying to stay on top every bit of news about where we are at this instant in the collapse.  And that on top of all of life's other demands is very fatiguing.  We need that relationship with whatever gives us joy in life to keep our chins up, and to make life worth living as we go through these times of change.  Thanks for the reminder!

[/quote]

Always a pleasure to serve.  As for me, this weekend I'm taking off work to go to the Adirondacks for a couple days.  Gonna swim in 13th Lake.  Nekkid.  Then retire to the bungalow for a few fingers of something tasty…  Hold my goddess close, and dream the Next World…

viva — Sager

  • Thu, Oct 31, 2013 - 05:40pm

    #27
    treemagnet

    treemagnet

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    Nope.

I said what I meant – cause once some people peek behind the curtain and see what they see, they can't 'unring  the bell'….but, preparedness is about a voluntary choice/action, so we're saying the same thing.  Is that your gasifier in that avatar?  If so, how do you keep/get out the tar and junk? 

  • Thu, Oct 31, 2013 - 06:19pm

    #28

    Dutch John

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    OK

Got your point. Yes that is a gasifier. Somewhere in the dungeons of PP is an article I wrote on woodgasification. Or visit my website woodgas.nl when you have questions.

Regards,
DJ

  • Sun, Nov 03, 2013 - 05:19am

    #29
    Marty59

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    Follow the money

The one aspect of doom and gloom that has not really been brought up in this thread, although alluded to, is that serious money propagandizes  both sides of the argument.  Buy side commentators, bulls, often have stock, bond, derivative, and options holdings  that they want to sell at the best price they can get, or are paid buy those that do, so they try to drive prices up .

The bears, or sell side commentators are in the reverse position. They are trying to cover shorts or create shorting opportunities, all of them by manipulating public perceptions of the macro condition to drive prices down.

Both prey on the little guy. It is a zero sum game.

Prices and values oscillate on a regular basis, even if to an unpredictable amount. Both groups exaggerate the potential of the oscillations for their own profit. 

True believers of any stripe open themselves to serious boom and bust.

The only answer I can think of is diversification and realistic pragmatism.

Find metrics independent of your biases to check against to see if things are really going the way you think they should. Technical analysis and chart reading are a good place to start.

Some people have been waiting for Armageddon for 2000 years but some peacemaker always comes along and screws it up for them.

 

  • Wed, Nov 20, 2013 - 07:03pm

    #30
    treemagnet

    treemagnet

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    Why do I like this so much?

http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2013/11/collapsing-consciously.html Obvious statement coming…..but why does a piece hit the target with me so well and others put me to sleep? This ones got something for everyone, but the focus on lilly white middle America as the last bastion of 'normal' struck a chord with me. Perhaps the specificity various points in the post appeals to my 13er need for clarity and brevity. Maybe some of you see it differently? Love the 'anti-tribe tribe' thing though – we're so fragile it won't take much to rock our little worlds.

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