Why it’s so hard to be a Peak Prosperity reader sometimes…

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  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 01:54pm

    #11
    liz cowen

    liz cowen

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    nigel, i walk

nigel,i walk down a country road. i let the frost and wnter break down alot of my garden. one of my preps was a lot of therapy work. the noise in my head is much quieter now…and i appreciate not having to deal with that now as my energy subsides some.

sitting by a river for as long as you care, is an immense  luxury..immense wealth. throw in a quiet mind and you are in priceless territory.

of course it took years of hard work to be at this point. it doesn't just drop out of the sky

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 02:27pm

    #12

    Oliveoilguy

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    nigel

[quote=nigel]

John Michael Greer called it catabolic collapse, or a series of step down mini collapses followed by periods of stability. He talked about this pattern over the course of decades if not centuries.

It's actually happening, but everyone just sees it as normal now, job layoffs, high energy prices, high food prices, high price for medicines. 

It's not a bad life, I had to feed some calves this morning, and rabbits and dogs, then I sat by the river for a few hours. I had a look at the vegetable garden and thought about weeding but i just sat by the river with the dogs instead. I can live this way and be content.

[/quote]

Well said….I agree that it is happening now. The collapse has started. And it's more likely to be slow and insidious than quick and obvious. BUT….if you change to a more sustainable lifestyle now, you will be ready for any scenario.

 

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 02:54pm

    #13
    rdriam

    rdriam

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    You buy car insurance.  Do

You buy car insurance.  Do you worry day and night about your car being destroyed?  You buy life insurance for your family.  Do you worry constantly about what happens to them if you die today?  Of course not.  That is why you bought the insurance.  If your car gets stolen or destroyed in an accident, you will be at least partially compensated by the type of policy you bought.  Same goes for life insurance.  You bought what you thought your family needed to make it without you.  After you buy the insurance, you go on with your life, feeling confident that if the worst happens, you and /or  your family will be OK.

 The same goes with preparing for the future in all other ways.  If you do not feel comfortable with your preparations, you either need more preparations or you need to examine the threats you are concerned about.  This site just presents the threats out there and how to plan for them.  Different locations, your age, your financial resources, and many other factors make one-size-fits-all plans useless.  You are your own underwriter.  You must use your resources in the most efficient manner for you and forget about situations that are unlikely for you.  Having done that, get on with your life and check in with Chris and others to make adjustments as situations change.  You should feel proud of yourself for caring for your family in ways others do not.  Insurance salesmen sell peace of mind.  Make sure you spend your time and resources in ways that will give you peace of mind.

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 02:55pm

    #14
    rdriam

    rdriam

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    You buy insurance

You buy car insurance.  Do you worry day and night about your car being destroyed?  You buy life insurance for your family.  Do you worry constantly about what happens to them if you die today?  Of course not.  That is why you bought the insurance.  If your car gets stolen or destroyed in an accident, you will be at least partially compensated by the type of policy you bought.  Same goes for life insurance.  You bought what you thought your family needed to make it without you.  After you buy the insurance, you go on with your life, feeling confident that if the worst happens, you and /or  your family will be OK.

 The same goes with preparing for the future in all other ways.  If you do not feel comfortable with your preparations, you either need more preparations or you need to examine the threats you are concerned about.  This site just presents the threats out there and how to plan for them.  Different locations, your age, your financial resources, and many other factors make one-size-fits-all plans useless.  You are your own underwriter.  You must use your resources in the most efficient manner for you and forget about situations that are unlikely for you.  Having done that, get on with your life and check in with Chris and others to make adjustments as situations change.  You should feel proud of yourself for caring for your family in ways others do not.  Insurance salesmen sell peace of mind.  Make sure you spend your time and resources in ways that will give you peace of mind.

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 03:16pm

    #15

    Snydeman

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    Thanks all!

There is a lot of wisdom in this thread I will surely ponder. We may need to step back from intense prepping for a bit, content in the knowledge that we're in better shape than most, and also remember that "optimal" is a moving target. Like I mentioned, having two young children adds a dimension we wouldn't have if it was just my wife and I; if collapse came and it was just us, we would worry less as we've already lived good lives and don't have so much race left to run. But my girls do, and all that I do, I do for them. Still, they need me now too. 

 

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 03:24pm

    #16
    osb272646

    osb272646

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    Critical Path

For those who would like a glimpse of where society could be headed, instead of collapse, I recommend Buckminster Fuller's "Critical Path".  Written in 1981, before PC's and Internet, Fuller conceptualized the advent of Hi – technology and where it would ultimately take society.  Many of the things he predicted are happening now, we don't notice them so much because of all the noise and chaotic day to day events overshadow and obscure them.

Younger people won't recognize Fuller.  But he was huge in the 60's and early 70's, very controversial, similar to what Snowden is today.

It is a difficult, almost tortuous, (at least for myself)  read, but the expanded awareness is well worth the effort, IMHO.

 

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 04:13pm

    #17

    SagerXX

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    Yeah, for [email protected]#$^%’s sake, hurry up and COLLAPSE ALREADY!

Lord knows I've had the above thought umpteen times.  The cognitive dissonance between prepping like mad and carrying on with whatever Biz-As-Usual one's day-to-day requires can be EPIC.  I own and run a Pilates studio, and while most of my (for the most part exceedingly well-to-do) clients have at least a nagging suspicion something is rotten in the state of Denmark, nobody's taking any steps (either that, or whoever IS has a really good head for OPSEC <smile>).  Over the last five years I've nibbled around the subject with those who seem open to it, but the convo never ventures far, and for the most part I have now stopped trying to educate anyone — unless they come to me with questions.  (My sweetheart is an example of the latter — we're now up to the "what is money?" and "why would TPTB/gov do this?" conversations <wry grin>…)  This cog dis can be a huge drain on my mental energies (and therefore my physical body), but I hele on…. (dat one Hawaiian kine expression mean "keep on truckin'"…)

My suggestions are:  

1.  keep on prepping like mad;

2.  keep on living your life within the new parameters (I have taken my living standard down *drastically* — I'm living off of less than $1200/month all in [granted, I'm single no kids no pets, but still…].  Doing this voluntarily, I have basically gone ahead and "crashed" myself, so when the living standard erodes suddenly (or slowly over time), I won't feel it as a loss;

3.  do things that give you soul-satisfaction EVERY DAY — even if it's just a 5-minute moment in an otherwise busy day…no point in getting safely to the future if we arrive a shell of our best/former selves;

4.  search for perspective every day — yes, we live in some challenging & mad times but in so many ways pretty much anybody living in a developed country/economy these days lives well by planetary standard — I lived without running water or an indoor toilet for 7 weeks last year…you think I take those things for granted now? <grin>;

5.  never, ever, EVER give the f!!k up…fight, love, struggle, toil and laugh your way into the Next World…  After all…what's the option?  

One man's opinion/method…

Viva — Sager

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 04:17pm

    #18

    jtwalsh

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    It’s O.K.

 

Snydeman:  I’m glad to see your latest post. I think you’ve got it. Here’s what I was going to write to you:

                In 1962 as the Cuban Missile Crisis unfolded I was eight years old.  My father worked for the defense department.  I could tell from his demeanor throughout those days that something was terribly wrong.  One of my most vivid memories is crouching by the rear brick wall of the gymnasium in my depression era elementary school.  Even in second grade I was aware enough to know that a big bomb would send shattered glass and bricks raining down on all of us. 

                Jump ahead twenty years.  In 1983 President Regan is seriously challenging the Soviet Union on multiple levels.  After our withdrawal from Vietnam, the invasion of Afghanistan by the Russians and the seizing of our embassy in Tehran it appeared that the United States was on the decline.  When Regan challenged this analysis, all the fear of nuclear war and mass devastation that had occupied the back of our brains came to the fore.  Movies like Testament and The Day After reminded us that the world was going to end with a burned surface and poisoned skies and seas.  We were doomed. 

The stalemate between the American and Russian empires began before I was born and showed no sign of ending short of mass death and destruction.  This slow boiling conflict was all we had ever known and it seemed that it would continue through our lives and beyond.  In 1983 I was a young father with two daughters, living fifteen miles from where the submarines carrying nuclear missiles were built.  Possibilities of long term survival seemed remote.

                Six years later the Berlin Wall fell, almost overnight.  By 1992 the Soviet Union itself was gone, without a missile being launched, or even a shot being fired from the West.

                I think what I am trying to convey is that the universe has a funny way of making things come out differently than you could have ever expected.  You need to plan, and you have.  You are far ahead of most folk and even ahead of many “prepers”.  You are mentally aware of the situation which gives you the power to grow, to observe and to change direction or make mid-course corrections if necessary.  Again, this awareness puts you light years ahead of your friends and neighbors who will pretend everything is o.k. until events overwhelm them.

                Prepare.  Be aware. Continue to learn.  Know that you are doing everything in your power for those little girls.  Then take a deep breath and relax.  Enjoy today.  Have fun with your wife and daughters.  Don’t regret these activities by torturing yourself thinking, “I should be preparing.  I wasted a day,” or “we shouldn’t have seen a movie, ordered a pizza, gone out to eat, etc, etc, because we need to spend more on preps.” If we are destroying our lives to get ready, what are we saving?

 It is a balancing act and a hard one to learn.  After years of trying I still have times when I don’t get it right, but if you remain aware of yourself and your situation you get up and try again.  My wife and I have raised five children.  We have watched a child with a congenital heart condition grow up, have children and begin a career not knowing if she will wake up tomorrow.  I have waited restless nights on end as a son did two tours of Afghanistan.  I have three grandchildren and one on the way.  In the past couple of years I have come to internalize the reality that they will in all likelihood be here long after I am gone.  I can help prepare them for the future but I cannot walk their walk with them.  All that’s given us it to do the best we can today, enjoy where we are and who we are with, and realize the universe is not always stacked against us.

Keep up the good work.   JT

  • Tue, Oct 29, 2013 - 05:56am

    #19

    digging

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    Yes it can be hard some times

Yes it can be hard some times I believe for various reasons. One that gets me down is just feeling lonesome for a 'team', a deep desire to be working together with others on these kinds of projects. 

 I've started to see things differently, at first I was just always thinking and working on 'preparing', but now I'm starting to realize it's far deeper, this is about 'growing' a new life. 

We are like seeds of the new forest that needs to grow, and we are suffering through the germination stages right now.

Digging

 

 

  • Tue, Oct 29, 2013 - 07:20am

    #20

    Dutch John

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    Enjoy the present

Modern society is like a zoo. With the difference that zoo animals are not enslaved. We are all born in this golden cage and many like it. Some of us escaped and enjoy a free, new, resilient, selfsufficient life. They will never voluntary return to the cages of the zoo. So enjoy every day. Don't be a prepper, waiting for the apocalypse. Be a selfsufficient person that enjoys his of her new life, independent of a possible collapse will occur or not. Whatever direction the future will go, I'm having a hell of a good time, having chosen for voluntary poverty…. Regards, DJ

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